Andy Warhol's Fifteen Minutes (1986-1987)

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Andy Warhol hosted the television show "Fifteen Minutes" on MTV from 1986-1987, making only five episodes. Four of the five episodes are available below, the videos and text are sourced from The Jailbreak and the videos were originally discovered via Zamboni Soundtracks.

(Note: For those who want to view more art television shows, Rhizome dedicated a day to art-related public access TV shows in December. To view the posts from that day, visit the December 2009 archive and scroll down to December 8, 2009.)


EPISODE 1 (1986): Robin Leach, Jerry Hall, John Oates, Dweezel and Moon Zappa, Tama Jamowitz, Paulina Porizkova, Sally Kirkland, Tracy Johns, Katherine Hamnett including fashion show with models Maria Kay, Anna Jonsson and Eric Perron, The Parachute Club, and The Pyramid Club with Happy Face, Lady Bunny, Dean Johnson, John Kelley as Dagmar Onasis and Lypsinka.



EPISODE 2 (ca. January 1987): Grace Jones, Kenny Scharf, Marc Jacobs including fashion show with models Charlotte Dawson, Pam Piper and Cynthia De Maria, Peter Beard, Kevin Dillon, John C. McGinley, Francesco Quinn, William Burroughs, Chris Stein, Angel Estrada including fashion show with models Lori Milligan and Rochelle Redfield, Elizabeth Peña, Gregory Abbott, Judd Nelson, Das Furlines, Isabel Toledo, Ruben Toledo, Suzie Zabrowska (fashion model for Isabel Toledo), Dovanna Pagowska (fashion model for Isabel Toledo), and Angelo Colon.



EPISODE 3 (ca. February 1987): Victor Love, Bobbi Humphrey, Wall to Wall (singing Tuff Luck), Ian McKellen, Bo Diddley, Moto-Fashion by Michael Schmidt and Anita Martire Schmidt models: Grace Nemergut, Raphael and Thomas H. Street, Martire models: Ralph Scibelli and Barb Carboy, Motorcycles: Pilar Limosner, Sally Randall, Hugh Mackie, Dimitri Turin and Willard, The Fleshtones, Saqqara Dogs with Ruby Ray and Bond Bergland, The Tunnel nightclub with Rudolf (club director), Thomas Leeser (co-owner) and Carla Steiner (bartender & singer), Regina Beukes (violinist), Miriam ...

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Andy Warhol - Braniff Air - TV Commercial

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From Braniff Airlines 1968 "When You Got It, Flaunt It" ad campaign. Salvador Dali was another celebrity featured in the campaign, to view that video, go here.

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Andy Warhol - The Cars: Hello Again [Music Video] (1984)

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Andy Warhol Japanese TDK Ad

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Top 5 - 10

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Three Wolf Moon T-Shirt

Jenny Jaskey is Rhizome's Curatorial Fellow

It's no secret that the internet, particularly with the help of social media, has birthed a whole new kind of celebrity. Here are a few of the highlights from the past year that demonstrate the power of viral media and the changing face of fame.



► Three Wolf Moon T-Shirt
In early Summer 2009, a t-shirt featuring three wolves howling at the moon appeared on Amazon.com. The Customer Reviews got a lot of attention (there are 1,598 to date), and by October the shirt made its first celebrity appearance on The Office. Three Wolf Moon is now a souvenir of itself.

► Tavi: The New Girl in Town
Her blog has been around since 2008, but Tavi’s had a big year, the thirteen-year old pixie fashion blogger recently appeared on the cover of Editor Dasha Zhukova’s debut edition of Pop Magazine. She is one of the most sought-after editorial voices in fashion and has not yet finished eighth grade.

► Susan Boyle
In April, Susan Boyle appeared on “Britain’s Got Talent.” The 47-year old, who says she lives with her cat Pebbles and has never been kissed, performed the song “I Dreamed a Dream” from Les Miserables. When the clip appeared on YouTube, there were over 100 million views within the first weeks, making it one of the top Internet videos of all time.

► Kanye West
Kanye’s unforgettable appearance at the 2009 VMAs sparked a host of memes and memes within memes. Even Obama weighed in on the issue.

The event that started it all:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1z8gCZ7zpsQ

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Top 5 - 10

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Image: From Jon Rafman's Google Street Views

Brian Droitcour is a writer, curator, and Russian-to-English translator. From 2002 to 2007 he lived in Moscow, where he covered art for The Moscow Times and Artchronika, a Russian monthly magazine. In 2008 he moved to New York, where he started working for Rhizome, first as curatorial fellow, then as staff writer. As a translator he's worked on several exhibition catalogues and art anthologies.



Jon Rafman's Google Street Views and the accompanying essay he wrote for Art Fag City's IMG MGMT series are sure to get several well-deserved mentions in end-of-the-year lists. Tom Moody on Google Street Views: "Jon Rafman's gathering of images from Google Street Views isn't really collecting at all but solid, groundbreaking journalism. Obviously untold hours were spent perusing this recent-but-everyday tool for images in very specific, focused categories. Photos that look like art photos, photos of mishaps, photos showing the success and failure of Google's face-blurring software, photos that show class issues in a supposedly 'universal' product (the down and out are more likely to be photographed unsympathetically than the up and in). As much as one hates to see more attention paid to the monopoly that aspires to put the happy face on Big Brother, this is worthwhile, thoughtful research." Kool-Aid Man in Second Life is a distorted twin to Google Street Views, another set of screen captures singling out accidental beauty and quirks of surveillance, only this time in a fantasy world that lets Rafman personify his searching gaze in a pitcher of fruit drink.

кремль.рф (kremlin.rf) won't go live until early next year, but the Russian presidential administration's new Cyrillic URL already made waves last month, when Russia became the first country to register top-level ...

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Tunnel (1999) - Thomas Demand

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The film presumably shows a fast-paced tracking shot through the tunnel in which Lady Diana Spencer, Princess of Wales, died in a car crash. At first the viewer seems to remember seeing these images in the media. But in reality the set is a true to life, cardboard mock-up of architectural details. Under closer inspection, one also realizes that instead of reproducing reality Thomas Demand creates a perfectly-constructed model world. The cleverly-lit cardboard scenery takes up an incident of recent history and, in doing so, mirrors the illusionary features of what appear to be familiar images. The film literally reflects upon the model of our relationship to images from the mass media. In the process, the construction, representation and repetition of reality create a complex weaving of connections. That the accident used as the theme was the result of a hectic, car chase caused by paparazzi lends the work yet another aspect of the reflection of the media.

-- FROM THE DESCRIPTION ON UBUWEB

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TV Party

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TV Party, hosted by Glenn O'Brien, ran from 1978 to 1982 on public access cable TV in New York City. A documentary about the show came out a few years ago, which renewed interest in the show and cemented its legacy. Below is an excerpt from the larger essay "THE TV PARTY STORY", where O'Brien reflects on the concept behind TV Party.

TV Party wasn't based on the Johnny Carson type talk show as much as it was based on Hugh Hefner's shows. Hef's Playboy's Penthouse premiered in 1960 and Playboy After Dark appeared in 1969. The format of both shows was a sophisticated cocktail party, not a desk and sofa set up. It was a fantasy of being at a super-hip, super exclusive jet set party. Hef wore a tux and there were always vixens aplenty on set as well as groovy guests like Sara Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald and Lenny Bruce.

I loved the concept, compared to the stiff format of the Tonight Show. TV Party was Playboy Penthouse twenty years later and with no money. But TV Party was meant to be much more than a regular old talk show. It was meant to be art and it was also meant to be a political party. That's why you see all of those pictures of Lenin and Engels and Marx and Stalin and Mao hanging on the walls. We were doing "socialist realist TV."

"TV Party is the show that's a cocktail party but which could also be a political party." That was the slogan. My idea was that socialism meant going out every night, and that social action started with socializing. I think we were trying to inject a sort of tribal element into things. That's what happens ...

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Notes on Going Under

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But the whole discourse of noise-as-threat is bankrupt, positively inimical to the remnants of power that still cling to noise. Forget subversion. The point is self-subversion, overthrowing the power structure in your own head. The enemy is the mind's tendency to systematize, sew up experience, place a distance between itself and immediacy... The goal is OBLIVION. - Simon Reynolds, "Noise"

Replace the word OBLIVION with DE-EVOLUTION and you have encapsulated the essence of the strangest art-music project that ever emerged from Akron, Ohio. While a quintet of jerky ectomorphs in hazmat suits (seemingly) singing about sadomasochism breaching the Billboard Top 20 in 1980 seemed unlikely, the legacy of DEVO is fraught with such contradiction. Formed in 1973, DEVO began as a polemical performance project, became a major buzz band and then crumbled under the weight of the attention they had cultivated. Outside of influencing a generation of musicians and artists, a surface reading would suggest the band only registered a few blips on the broader pop culture radar—"Whip It", their pioneering music video work and a legendary Saturday Night Live performance—but tracing the dramatic arc of DEVO reveals a fascinating back story. While the group might be most easily read in relation to their 1970s Ohio peers Pere Ubu, The Dead Boys or Chi-Pig, more enduring points of reference may be found in the deadpan, dour and decidedly humorless synthpop of Telex, Gary Numan and Kraftwerk. Comparisons notwithstanding, DEVO defied categorization and their creative exploration of emerging technology, hermetic logic and contentious relationship with the mass market make them quite relevant to new media artists—they're just the band you want!

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Getty Images Hollywood (2007) - Joel Holmberg

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