Posts for July 2013

Best of Rhizome May/June

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GIF extract form Hito Steyerl, How Not To Be Seen. A Fucking Didactic Educational .MOV File , 2013. HD video file, single screen, 14min.

In May and June, the most viewed page on Rhizome was an artwork by Jonas Lund, We See in Every DirectionPart of ongoing series The Download, Lund's piece is an an application for anonymous, communal web browsing that has found an active user base. Whenever one opens it, there are usually several other strangers logged in, often sharing a browsing experience in multiple languages. During this time, the most commented-upon page on Rhizome was Orit Gat's examination of the political affinities attached to URLs in the cases of .art and .sy, which prompted some good responses from Tom Moody in particular.

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Email Before PRISM: Miranda July, "We Think Alone" (2013)

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There is a scene in the movie Airplane! (1980) in which a young boy suddenly recognizes the real-life actor who is playing the character of co-pilot Roger Murdoch. "Wait a minute!" he exclaims. "I know you! You're Kareem Abdul-Jabbar!"

The scene breaks the "fourth wall" to comic effect. Most viewers in 1980 would have recognized Abdul-Jabbar instantly, but the conventions of performance dictate that we try to pretend that he is just an ordinary schmoe in the cockpit. By "recognizing" Abdul-Jabbar, the boy calls attention to these conventions, and breaks the tension for viewers who were probably struggling to see the six-time MVP of the NBA as an airline employee.

Such an acknowledgment is missing from a more recent project involving Abdul-Jabbar, Miranda July's We Think Alone.

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XFR STN at the New Museum

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Rhizome's digital conservator Ben Fino-Radin has been hard at work with our New Museum colleagues in preparation for XFR STN (Transfer Station), an open-door artist-centered media archiving project that will take over the museum's Fifth Floor gallery space through September 8. Artists, if you have old media stored in the back of your closet - decaying jaz drives, defunct hard drives, or moving image formats - with long-lost art or documentation or work-in-progress, this is your chance to work with a technician armed with top-of-the-line preservation tools. Visit the XFR STN micro-site to learn more about the project and request an appointment. The project begins July 17; we'll be sure to keep you posted on any interesting finds that emerge during the course of the exhibition.

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Sketching Bradley Manning

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As the Bradley Manning trial presses on at Fort Meade, Maryland, artist Clark Stoeckley (of Wikileaks Truck fame) documents the proceedings in sketches. So far, the artists tells us he has compiled over 300 drawings from both sides of the gallery, the jury box, and the live video feed. The renderings are set to be published by OR Books in September as a graphic novel, which is an appropriate format for an epic conflict between good and evil. The previews of Stoeckley's graphic novel look very exciting, but what we find most compelling about the project is Stoeckley's commitment to the trial and to Manning, and the mundane details of the process that he captures through his daily practice of drawing and observation.

Day 1 of the trial

 

Captain Hunter Whyte, David Coombs, Bradley Manning

Courtroom observers wearing shirts that read "truth" have been mandated by officials to turn them inside-out.

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Performance GIFs 10: Paul Kindersley

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This is the latest in an ongoing series of performance GIFs curated by Jesse Darling. Previously: Maja CuleLegacy RussellJaakko PallasvuoCreighton BaxterGenevieve BelleveauJennifer ChanMarisa Olson, Dwayne Strike.
 

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The Week Ahead: #YoungerThanRihanna Edition

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A few weeks ago, DISmagazine announced it would team up with 89plus and Serpentine Gallery in search of artists who are #YoungerThanRihanna. The contest officially opens today and promises a cash prize in the form of two new grants; the two winners will be selected by international jury and popular vote, respectively. Artists, writers, architects, filmmakers, musicians, designers, scientists, and technologists are all welcome to submit, provided they are young enough.

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Post-internet Curating, Denver Style: An Interview with Carson Chan

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Draft Urbanism, the core exhibition program in the latest edition of the Denver-based Biennial of the Americas, brings together practitioners in art, architecture, and film from across the Americas to examine our evolving relationship with the physical and social fabric of our cities. The biennial features a series of newly commissioned works in various public spaces throughout Denver, from breweries to highway medians. Carson Chan, architecture writer and curator, and co-founder of architecture collective Program (Berlin), is Executive Curator of this year’s edition.

Carson Chan in Denver. Photograph: Anthony Camera.

KAREN ARCHEY: Draft Urbanism seems to be more inclusive and unique than your average biennial. Could you describe the curatorial purview and physical format of the biennial, and explain how it is a departure from the standard biennial (i.e. Lyon, Venice)? How does it relate to the biennial you organized in Marrakech last year?

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Software Takes Command: An Interview with Lev Manovich

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Lev Manovich is a leading theorist of cultural objects produced with digital technology, perhaps best known for The Language of New Media (MIT Press, 2001). I interviewed him about his most recent book, Software Takes Command (Bloomsbury Academic, July 2014).

Photograph published in Alan Kay and Adele Goldberg, "Personal Dynamic Media" with the caption, "Kids learning to use the interim Dynabook." 

MICHAEL CONNOR: I want to start with the question of methodology. How does one study software? In other words, what is the object of study—do you focus more on the interface, or the underlying code, or some combination of the two?

LEV MANOVICH: The goal of my book is to understand media software—its genealogy (where does it come from), its anatomy (the key features shared by all media viewing and editing software), and its effects in the world (pragmatics). Specifically, I am concerned with two kinds of effects: 

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Rhizome is Hiring

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Our long-time and wonderful Program Director, Zoë Salditch, is sadly leaving Rhizome for an exciting new opportunity (stay tuned!). Since we can't possibly replace her, we're advertising a brand new opportunity at Rhizome:

Community Manager & Program Administrator  
(Full-time w/ benefits or part-time negotiable)

Deadline: Monday, July 29th at 9am
Send a cover letter and resume to: jobs@rhizome.org
**Please note this position is only available to those already eligible to work in the US

Rhizome seeks a highly capable, communicative and organized internet native to care for and cultivate our community — through our website, social media, IRL events, cultural infrastructure, and new forms of participation that have yet to be imagined. This individual will also play an important role in supporting and enabling, through strong administration, our best work as a leader in contemporary art and technology. ...

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Artist Profile: Nick Briz

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Part of an ongoing series of interviews with artists who have developed a significant body of work but may not (yet) be well known to our readers. Nick Briz is an artist/educator/organizer living in Chicago, and co-founder of the conference and festival GLI.TC/HThis interview took place via Google Drive.

Nick Briz, The Glitch Codec Tutorial (2010-2011). Screenshot from YouTube video.

Daniel Rourke: You are involved in an "improvisational realtime/performance media art event" at the moment called "No Media," where participants are explicitly discouraged from preparing before they take part, or from creating documentation of any kind. I was lucky enough to see the first iteration of No-Media at GLI.TC/H 2112.

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