Posts for May 2010

Alpha+Beta (2009-) - Michael Willis

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Missile Variations (2010) - Oliver Laric

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Rhizome 2010 Benefit Party

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Come out and celebrate another great year of Rhizome with dancing, reveling, and perusing of artworks and unusual art merchandise developed especially to benefit Rhizome. This year, the Benefit is not ticketed (that's right, free!), but we ask that you RSVP for yourself, and guests.


There will also be a silent auction, with original works by Kerstin Bratsch, Paul Chan, Brody Condon, Mark Essen, Amy Granat, Steven Lambert, Julie Mehretu, Emily Roysdon, Michael Smith, AIDS-3D, and Eteam. Online bidding will be up on the benefit site soon - so stay tuned!

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Highlights from ITP’s Spring Show 2010

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I visited ITP’s Spring Show on Monday, the open house for NYU’s graduate interactive technology program. Like years past, the kiosk-like presentation of projects makes the event seem a bit like a science fair, with artists and inventors on hand to answer questions. ITP’s student body is quite diverse - ranging from web entrepreneurs to roboticists to performance artists and more - and this aspect usually guarantees that you’ll come across something interesting. See below for some quick notes from this year’s show.

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Rhizome at No Soul For Sale

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Customs form from David Horvitz's Mail Nothing to the Tate Modern

Rhizome will be one of the over 70 alternative arts organizations participating in this year's No Soul For Sale festival at the Tate Modern, May 14th-16th. We will be exhibiting the unopened packages sent in as part of David Horvitz's Mail Nothing to the Tate Modern in our space in the Turbine Hall. For a live display of the movement of all these packages, please visit the Mail Nothing to the Tate Modern site. I will be offline today, as I myself will be in transit. I plan to blog from the festival all weekend. So, stay tuned...

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You've Got Mail!

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This is the first post back from No Soul For Sale at the Tate Modern, and I thought I'd kick it off by discussing the project in Rhizome's very own space, David Horvitz's Mail Nothing to the Tate Modern. When we first launched the call, we weren't sure how many people would respond and actually send in empty packages to the Tate. Turns out, hundreds! When I arrived yesterday, the Tate staffers had graciously stored all of our mail in a neat pile for us in their storage facility, and it was real delight/surprise to show up and find so much mail. Many of the envelopes and packages were decorated with writing, drawing, and spraypaint. For those who sent in mail, thank you so much! See below for some shots of our space and some of the mail we received. I plan to dutifully photograph each parcel over the next few days too, hopefully for a pdf catalog, a special section of the Mail Nothing site, or something of the like.

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Dispatches from No Soul For Sale

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At last year's No Soul For Sale, New York fanzine K48 gave us an inflatable room. This year, they pasted a gigantic slice of pizza on to the floor of the Turbine Hall, titled "The Last Slice" -- here it is!

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Dispatches from No Soul For Sale

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Oregon Painting Society Member in Costume

During the No Soul For Sale press preview this morning at 10am, I heard some noisey racket emanating from across the hall. I ran over to see what was going on. Four members of Oregon Painting Society, some in costume, were hunched over a circle of plastic potted plants. Brenna Murphy, a member of the collective and an artist whose work we’ve posted to Rhizome before, explained to me how the instruments work. The plants are electronic oscillators, whose circuit is completed by human touch. The sounds can be manipulated by moving the leaves of the plants.

Oregon Painting Society are a Portland-based art collective who do performance, music, video, and installations. Check out their site here.

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Oregon Painting Society Playing the Plant Instruments

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Plant Instruments

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Plant Instruments

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Video by Oregon Painting Society

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Oregon Painting Society's Table

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Dispatches from No Soul For Sale

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I first heard about Melbourne's Y3K through my friend Alex Vivian, an Australian artist and musician who has shown work there in the past and plays music with Christopher L G Hill, who co-runs the space. I chatted with Christopher and he gave me a KrystKrvstoffiston tape. Y3K describe themselves as a "project-by-project open model contemporary art gallery, incorporating multi-functional spaces." (Check out some of their past projects and exhibitions.) For No Soul For Sale, Y3K brought a bunch of publications over by artists from Australia and New Zealand, as well as a video by Tahi Moore. If I ever make it to Melbourne, hopefully I'll get to see what they're up to IRL.

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Dispatches from No Soul For Sale

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Ballroom Marfa, a contemporary art center based in Marfa, Texas, presented Erika Blumenfeld's Moving Light: Lunation 1011 in their space, pictured above. Last year they showed Kaffe Matthew's Sonic Bed_Marfa, which was really neat. This year they projected Erika Blumenfeld's Moving Light: Lunation 1011, a work she created as a resident at Ballroom Marfa. You can read a bit about the work below, from the press release:

In September and October of 2004, Blumenfeld went to Marfa, Texas as Ballroom Marfa's inaugural artist-in-residence. Through the generosity and non-financial support of the McDonald Observatory, Blumenfeld was granted the rare opportunity to work on site up on the main peak of the observatory in one of their astronomer's houses. During her two-month stay, Blumenfeld created her very first video-based installation, titled Moving Light 1011.

Lunation is the mean time between two successive moons, and the lunation number is calculated from the first new moon that occured in 1923. This piece, titled 1011 after hte actual lunation cycle, documented the waxing and waning of moonlight over a 30-day period, from new moon to new moon.

Recorded through an altered telescope and self-built recording devices, Blumenfeld documented the varying intensities of light radiating from the moon onto handheld photographic film. The resulting images portray not only the changing quantity of moonlight in its nightly phase, but also the artists own hand which, in holding each piece of film over the long two-minute exposures, moved slightly from her own heartbeat and body's subtle sway. The relationship between technology and the human implementing it is expressed in the completed video installation, where each of the exposures taken over the 30 days were animated in sequence to produce a moving account of the lunar cycle.

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