Posts for March 2010

1 Question Interview with Hanne Mugaas

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Takeshi Murata's Melter 2 at Gosen Skole from "Keep On Moving, Don't Stop"

I tracked down curator Hanne Mugaas, one of the organizers behind New York's Art Since the Summer of '69, for a 1 question interview, à la Rafaël Rozendaal's One Question Interview blog. Mugaas is the first to curate a new public video art initiative in Stavanger, Norway called Public Screens. In the spirit of Boston's Lumen Eclipse or Creative Time's At 44 1/2, Public Screens presents video art around the city on large public screens. Mugaas's exhibition for this new project "Keep On Moving, Don’t Stop" brings together animations by a young generation of artists who grew up under the specter of the internet, television and video games. Artists include Michael Bell-Smith, Vidya Gastaldon, Ezra Johnson, Yui Kugimiya, Takeshi Murata, Adam Shecter, and Espen Friberg. (More shots of the exhibit after the jump.) Given the topic of the show, I thought it would be fitting to ask Hanne about her childhood exposure to animation.

What was your favorite animated television show as a child and why?

My favorite animation as a kid was Flåklypa Grand Prix (Pinchcliffe Grand Prix) from 1975. It was made by the legendary Norwegian animator Ivo Caprino. It's about the inventor Reodor Felgen who's living with his animal friends Ludvig, a nervous, pessimistic and melancholic hedgehog, and Solan, a cheerful and optimistic magpie. One day, the trio discover that one of Reodor's former assistants, Rudolf Blodstrupmoen, has stolen his design for a race car engine and has become a world champion Formula One driver. Solan secures funding from an Arab oil sheik who happens to be vacationing in Flåklypa, and to enter the race, the trio builds a gigantic racing car ...

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Picture 35 (2010)- Anders Clausen

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Photo via Contemporary Art Daily

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uninspired minimalist graphics and harmonica (2010) - Jacob Broms Engblom

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Introducing: dump.fm

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Editor's Note: Ryder Ripps, of Internet Archaeology, along with Tim Baker (Delicious) and Scott Ostler (MIT Exhibit), recently launched a beta version of dump.fm, a chat room where participants communicate solely through images. The site combines the creative back and forth of surf clubs, tumblr’s loose and rapid-fire network of image transmission, and the real time spontaneity of an old school chat room. Right now dump.fm is strictly invite-only, but Ryder was generous enough to offer a special invite code to Rhizome readers - “RHIZOME” - so they can play around with the site. Ryder drafted a statement about his concept and aspirations for dump.fm, below.

I remember going into AOL chat rooms, and experiencing instantaneous glee. The hyper-everything world; where experiences come and go at the pace of your typing. Instantaneous collaboration and connection. These are the feelings I wanted to recreate in conceptualizing dump.fm. Dump.fm is a place where you can share images from anywhere on the web, your hard drive or right from your webcam, in real time with other people. Today content moves so fast, making a blog post from a week ago irrelevant. Dump.fm is a place where content is hyper-transient and used to facilitate connections and induce creativity. I think in the future people will produce and consume content much faster and because of this we must reconsider the value of content. For the surf club Spirit Surfers, content is a way to document and make public the most powerful content in the hypnotic surf, “Most of the really enlightening surfs I've had did not end with a post to a surf club -- surfing is so private, it rarely ends in a public act.”, as club creator Kevin Bewersdorf states. Where surfing was a private act from ...

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Computer Graphics (1960) - Kurd Alsleben and Cord Passow

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Germany’s first computer graphics were jointly produced in 1960 by the artist Kurd Alsleben and the physicist Cord Passow. They worked on an analog computer which was linked to an automatic drafting unit and transformed parameters of a differential equation into deviations and disturbances.

Via the compArt Database of Early Computer Art

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A sea star (1965) - Petar Milojević

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Black and white plotter drawing created on an IBM 360/75, printed on a CalComp Plotter 565

Via the compArt Database of Early Computer Art

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Compart Nr. 11 (1970) - Peter Kreis

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Colored plotter drawing

Via the compArt Database of Early Computer Art

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untitled (sine curve 2) (1969) - Charles Csuri

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black and white plotter drawing

Via the compArt Database of Early Computer Art

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Untitled drawing (1978) - Stephen Bell

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Data generated using Ranstak program and "helix" shapes
Plotted on newsprint with cyan, magenta, and yellow edding 1380 brush-pens. 9" x 9".


Via the compArt Database of Early Computer Art

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Group Theory Grid (1969) - Tony Longson

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computer assisted painting

Via the compArt Database of Early Computer Art

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