Posts for February 2010

Call for Entries

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New York-based annual film and video festival Migrating Forms is currently seeking entries for their upcoming 2010 festival, May 14-23, 2010 at Anthology Film Archives. More info about the festival below, you can apply here. Regular Deadline is February 15 and late deadline is March 15, 2010.

Migrating Forms is an annual festival dedicated to new experimental film and video. Migrating Forms grew out of the New York Underground Film Festival, which ended in April 2008. Led by the former directors and programmers of NYUFF, the festival continues the tradition of presenting the best new experimental film and video each Spring at New York's historic Anthology Film Archives. Last year's inaugural festival featured new work by Stephanie Barber, Phil Collins, Barry Doupe, Bradley Eros, Kevin Jerome Everson, Jim Finn, Nikolaus Geyrhalter, Michael Gitlin, Barbara Hammer, Susan Hiller, Owen Land, Oliver Laric, Jeanne Liotta, Josephine Meckseper, Pavel Medvedev, Shana Moulton, Pat O'Neil, Lucy Raven, Ben Rivers, Michael Robinson, Amie Siegel, John Smith, Naomi Uman, Erika Vogt, and many more.

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Reminder

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Join us at the New Museum next Friday, February 19th, at 7pm for the New Silent Series event Triple Canopy: The Medium Was Tedium.

Triple Canopy is an online magazine that explores how the Web informs the experience of reading literature and viewing artworks. The publication’s development has been inspired in part by a critical engagement with the legacy of Aspen magazine (1965-71). Artists and writers contributed projects to Aspen in the form of easily distributable media such as flip books, flexi-disc records, and paper sculpture. These projects coincided with a broader contemporaneous phenomenon: artworks intended to appear exclusively in magazines. The New Silent event, The Medium Was Tedium, examines how this move from the exhibition space to the printed page has been subsequently repeated by artists in relation to other media, such as television programming and the Internet. Triple Canopy’s editors will discuss practices that traverse mediums and the media with artists Mel Bochner, Daniel Bozhkov, and Erin Shirreff.

Friday, February 19, 7pm
at the New Museum, New York, NY
$6 Members/ $8 General Public
BUY TICKETS

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Cities in Miniature: Ahmet Öğüt's "Exploded City"

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Children love Ahmet Öğüt’s Exploded City. Its miniature edifices are suited to the kid’s-eye-view; youthful height allows the same unobstructed vistas into the cityscape as one of its citizens might have. A further draw for children: there’s a model train underfoot (directly; museum security was busy), albeit stationary. And certain of the city's scaled buildings do resemble dollhouses, although there are no dolls here. Nobody lives in the Exploded City; there are no figurines amidst its reproductions. This vacancy is probably for the best, since Öğüt’s piece—on view at the Berkeley Art Museum until April 11, 2010—is composed entirely of models of buildings that have been damaged or destroyed by terrorist strikes since the 1990s. The structures may be in their inviolate form, but nevertheless, human models placed throughout the doomed buildings would impart a macabre note to the city.

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The Medium is the Medium (1969)

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Produced by WGBH-TV in Boston, the Medium is the Medium is one of the earliest and most prescient examples of the collaboration between public television and the emerging field of video art in the United States. WGBH commissioned six visual artists Allan Kaprow, Nam June Paik, Otto Piene, James Seawright, Thomas Tadlock and Aldo Tambellini to create original works for broadcast television. In pursuing their individual aesthetics, these artists produced works that explored the parameters of the new medium, from image processing and interactivity to video dance and sculpture.

Produced by WGBH. Executive Producer: David Oppenheim. Producers: Ann Gresser, Pat Marx. Director: Fred Barzyk.

-- DESCRIPTION FROM UBUWEB

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Subliminal Hypotheses

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Omer Fast, Take a Deep Breath, 2008
(Image courtesy of Postmasters gallery)

Between two recent solo exhibitions in New York, at The Whitney Museum of American Art and Postmasters gallery, the popular Jerusalem-born, Berlin-based artist Omer Fast presented three film installations in continued pursuit of his driving preoccupations: the fact/fiction dialectic that underlies film, and the resulting description of any tangible identification of “truth” as abstract.

Fast is known for a practice of importing subjects into culturally fraught scenarios appropriated from the past (Nazi-occupied Poland, colonial America), the present (Iraq) and, perhaps (in the case of the vaguely post-apocalyptic Whitney project), the future. It may seem contradictory to regard setting a film in the present a form of historical borrowing—whose time is this time but ours?—however, if anything is certain about Fast’s otherwise deliberately ambiguous system of filmmaking, it is that casting the setting is always a performative gesture; setting is setting into place and into time. Fast sets human elements into artificial contexts, and any temporal dissonance lacking between where his subjects come from and where they are put is made up for in the unbreachable gap that exists between the experience of being and of being recorded.

Fast’s show at Postmasters, his third since 2002, includes two videos, De Grote Boodschap (2007, 27 min.)—translated literally from the Flemish as “the great message”—and Take a Deep Breath (2008, 27 min.). Neither employs ostensible documentary techniques, in fact their scripts are weighted by a density of plotty clues and keys smuggled in prosaic lines; lines nested in average characters; characters staged in ordinary scenes; scenes camouflaged in a purposefully nondescript aesthetic. The gestalt is a conspicuous banality. To capitalize on this configuration, Fast crafts a suspense that never sags nor hurries, and in ...

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BarthesByBarthesByBart (2010) - Michael David Murphy

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Interview with Temporary Services

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Copies of "Art Work: A National Conversation About Art, Labor, and Politics"

Independent, Chicago-based collective Temporary Services, comprised of Brett Bloom, Salem Collo-Julin and Marc Fischer, have been producing exhibitions, events, projects, and publications since 1998. More recently, they published the newspaper and website “Art Work: A National Conversation About Art, Labor, and Politics” which assembles writing by artists, activists and academics about the economic decline and its influence on the livelihood of artists. (I previously posted one article to Rhizome from this collection, "Art Versus Work" by Julia Bryan-Wilson.) I had the opportunity to interview Temporary Services over e-mail, and they answered my questions as a group via Google docs. - Jenny Jaskey

This post is the concluding article in a series on art production and economy. To read the other articles in this series, go here for an interview with Caroline Woolard of OurGoods and here for an interview with Jeff Hnilicka of FEAST.

How did Temporary Services begin?

TS: We began in 1998 as a storefront space that presented experimental art projects and exhibitions. In late 1999 there were several people collaborating in and around Temporary Services. We decided to form a group. Since that time, the group has fluctuated in membership to arrive at the current configuration of Brett Bloom, Salem Collo-Julin and Marc Fischer, which has been stable since 2002.

Your most recent project is a paper and accompanying website, "Art Work: A National Conversation about Art, Labor, and Economics." What led to its development?

TS: We were invited by Christopher Lynn, the director of SPACES Gallery in Cleveland, to organize an exhibition. SPACES is an important art organization that has its origins in the nationwide alternative art spaces infrastructure built in the 1970s, and funded in part by a more adventurous National Endowment for the ...

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69 (1969) - Denys Irving

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Originally via Thomas Beard

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UFO's (1971) - Lillian Schwartz

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Call for Submissions

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Canadian sound art festival send + receive have extended the deadline for submissions to March 5, 2010. Read the below for more information, or visit the original call for submissions.

Calling all Sound Artists! send + receive is an annual audio art festival showcasing current and newly emerging areas of sonic investigation in a variety of forms through live performance, radio broadcasts, web-based projects, internet streaming projects, installations, film and video screenings, workshops, talks and panel discussions.

send + receive is an international festival that advances the discipline of sound art, and is one of the few annual media arts festivals in North America focusing exclusively on sound-based work.

As the festival is programed well in advance of each edition, most submissions received by the March 5, 2010 deadline will be considered for future editions and off season programming in 2011 and beyond.

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