Posts for November 2010

Required Reading

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Angelo Plessas, TheHistoryOfADecadeThatHasNotYetBeenNamed.com (still), 2007

Greek-Italian artist Angelo Plessas’ interactive websites (Angeloplessas.com) integrate elements of drawing, sound, Flash animation and innovative HTML coding. Each of his online two-dimensional “sculptures” is sealed with a domain name that playfully evokes the language of philosophy, literature and drama. Challenging concepts of space and ownership on the Internet, Plessas’ websites are, like graffiti bombed on a public wall, the acts of a guerrilla artist intervening in public space.

Plessas has come a long way since his first and ongoing aesthetic project: documenting face-like compositions he discovers in random configurations of objects and architecture (InternationalPortraitGallery.com). He officially launched his artistic career in 2001 when artist and curator Miltos Manetas selected his work for the Internet-inspired group show Biennale.net at Deitch Projects, New York. Now, the artist is exploring projects that take on a curatorial scope, including the recent one-day video projection extravaganza Bring Your Own Beamer at the Kunsthalle Athena.

With the lines between his online and offline work becoming increasingly blurred, Plessas is evolving in the manner of his medium. As the Internet expands, so does Plessas’ practice, and as the artist matures, perhaps he might shed light on where the Internet might take us. Sitting at his seaside apartment in Athens, Plessas takes me on a journey through his virtual universe, which ultimately leads right back to reality itself…whatever that might be, or could become.

-- FROM THE INTRODUCTION TO "ANGELO PLESSAS: LIFE THROUGH A WEB BROWSER" BY STEPHANIE BAILEY IN ART LIES, ISSUE 67

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asdfbmp (2010) - Kim Asendorf

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Created by Kim Asendorf, asdfbmp is a pixel art generator app for iPhone and iPod Touch. It creates a pixel structure by using a spatial partition algorithm resulting in fields populated by pixel patterns.

You can choose from 16 bitmap patterns and 32 colours. You can adjust the minimal field size, the probability of a new division and the proportion between horizontal and vertical division.

In the draw mode you decide which field is going to be divided. The auto mode divides until there is no more field left.

Additionally there is a mode menu where you can choose extra blending modes such as pattern, fill, outline, empty, random.

-- FROM THE ASDFBMP SITE

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Sunset (2007) - Hector Llanquin

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This is a series of digital photographs of sunsets altered by a controlled download error. These files where bitmap transferred via personal messaging software (adium) from one place to another. After the file was completely downloaded the transfer is aborted. The final result is that the bitmap repeats the last horizontal downloaded pixel to complete the image dimensions. This was administrated by monitoring the downloading process to stop the transfer in a certain point of the image to create some relation between the image and the error.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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SPEED SHOW vol.4: Super Niche - NYC

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Artist Aram Bartholl's roaming exhibition series SPEED SHOW descended upon New York last Wednesday. The concept is simple: rent all the computers at an internet cafe for an evening and show a bunch of online work. So far, it's been organized in Berlin, Vienna, Amsterdam, and now here! See some shots from the show below, all photos by Aram Bartholl.

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Required Reading

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Jean-Luc Godard, Voyage(s) en utopie, Jean-Luc Godard, 1946-2006, 2006 (Installation view of the “Aujourd’hui” section. Centre Pompidou, Paris.)

In order to explore the contradictions and the potential of time- based art, especially in its cinematic guise, I trace a number of overlapping and conflicting genealogies of film and video art. I believe that only by creating a constellation of such genealogies can the logic and structural antinomies of film and video art—and of time-based art in general—be brought into relief and related to the wider changes in the political economy of time during the past decades, during which the West has seen a gradual demise of Fordist assembly-line production and a disintegration of the strict separation between work and “free time.” The classic alternation of work and leisure can be called, with Guy Debord, a form of pseudocyclical time, an apparent return to agricultural, “mythical” cycles in a temporal regime built on irreversible, historical time—or rather, on a reified form of such historical time, that of commodity production.

“Once there was history, but not any more,” because the class of owners of the economy, which is inextricably tied to economic history, must repress every other irreversible use of time because it is directly threatened by them all. The ruling class, made up of specialists in the possession of thingswho are themselves therefore possessed by things, is forced to link its fate with the preservation of this reified history, that is, with the preservation of a new immobility within history.7

This immobility is manifested in pseudocyclical time, a commodified temporality that is homogenous and suppresses “any qualitative dimension” or, at most, mimics such dimensions in moments of sham liberation.8 For Debord, time-based art from the 1960s could consist only of such pseudoindividual, pseudoliberatory moments ...

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Interview with Olga Goriunova, Curator of Fun with Software

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Humor, fun and nonsense often figure greatly in the current modes of communication on the web, whereby memes and sardonic blog comments are commonplace -- if not expected. Such trappings have found their way into media art practices from Cory Arcangel’s cover of Arnold Schoenberg’s op.11 Drie Klavierstucke using cat videos on YouTube to F.A.T. Lab’s Kanye West Interrupt bookmarklet. The question that these works and others like it raises is this: does humor appear to be a synergistic outgrowth of technology (and how does it relate to its development)?

In the latest exhibition "Fun with Software" at Bristol’s Arnolfini, curator Olga Goriunova seeks to document and explore how humorous approaches to software lead to innovation. Working with early net and media artists from JODI to Graham Harwood, the exhibition is a retrospective of peculiar approaches to computation. I sat down with Goriunova to talk about the show’s premise and how that premise contextualizes and contrasts the current era of humor and technology.

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Trash Talking (2006) - Paper Rad

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Via UbuWeb

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"Free" Events This Month

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Lisa Oppenheim, The Sun Is Always Setting Somewhere Else, 2006

The "Free" exhibition is up and running, and I'd like to point you to some events organized in conjunction with the exhibition this week and later this month, so you can add them to your calendar. Be sure to the dedicated Free site for more information about the show, events, a blog, and more.



“Free” as in Freedom and “Free” as in Free Beer: Lecture and Walk with Artist Steve Lambert
Saturday November 6, 3pm
Free to New Museum Members, $8 General Public

Artist Steve Lambert will discuss the various definitions of “Free,” from human liberation, the law, freedom of movement, to economics. Tying together hippies, punk rock, Franklin Roosevelt, and the Free Software movement, the program will begin with a short lecture, followed by a short walking tour through the galleries and into the streets to see how these ideas apply in the real world.



DIS Magazine Presents: Elastic Youth: Interpreting the Scrunchie
Sunday November 14th, 2010, 3 PM
Free to New Museum Members, $8 General Public

For the first in a series of lectures organized by the online fashion magazine DIS, Elastic Youth: Interpreting the Scrunchie, David Riley offers an in-depth analysis of the controversial hair accessory. Drawing on patent documents, fashion, and pop culture, he traces its history from mass marketed phenomenon to object of derision among the fashion elite. David Riley is an artist and musician living in NYC, known for his involvement with the band Mirror Mirror and the collaborative group The Society for the Advancement of Inflammatory Consciousness. He has exhibited and/or performed at The Kitchen, Momenta, John Connelly Presents, Klaus von Nichtssagend, Andrew Edlin, Audio Visual Arts (AVA) and Index Art Center, as well as venues around the USA and Europe ...

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Soviet 1987 Digital Image Editing Tool

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Video from 1987 depicting early digital image editing techniques in the Soviet Union using rotary scanners, magnetic tape, and trackballs.

Originally viaPetaPixel and Boing Boing

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NY Art Book Fair 2010

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A Young Kim, We Listen to Bach Transfixed Because This Is Listening to A Human Mind, 2010
(from the studio alabaster booth)

Printed Matter's annual contemporary art book extravaganza The NY Art Book Fair opened last night, and I dropped by today to take some shots of the festivities for the blog. Easily one of my favorite yearly art events in New York, the fair hosts an overwhelming amount of booths, lectures, screenings, performances, and more by 200+ participating independent publishers, booksellers, zinesters, and artists. The fair is at PS1 in Long Island City, it's free, and it will be open today until 7pm, Saturday from 11am-7pm, and on Sunday from 11am-5pm. Also, be sure to scroll down to the end of this post for a round-up of media art and digital culture-related highlights.

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Booth for Swiss independent publisher Nieves Books

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"You Are Her" a mini-exhibit of 1990s riot grrrl zines, organized by San Francisco's Goteblüd

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Brooklyn-based Cinders Gallery's booth

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Artist Sto Pit's Facebook at the Cinders Gallery booth

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Editions by Trevor Paglen and Starlee Kine at The Thing Quarterly's booth

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The third iteration of Dispatch's "RE: 1975-76 New York Art Yearbook" at the Dispatch booth
(Dispatch did another version of this project at No Soul For Sale at the Tate Modern, which we covered on Rhizome, here.)

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Promotional prints for Laura Owen's book Fruits and Nuts at independent LA boutique Ooga Booga's booth

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e-flux drew a thematic table of contents (of sorts) to all the essays published in their journal on the walls of their project space

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Really gorgeous paper editions by Tauba Auerbach, at the Printed Matter booth

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Another one of Tauba Auerbach's editions

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Issues of Dutch magazine Open, which covers art and the public domain.

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The art ...

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