Posts for November 2009

SHIFT Electronic Arts Festival Basel 2009 on VernissageTV

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For those who missed the recent SHIFT Electronic Arts Festival in Basel, VernissageTV put together a video compiling installation footage from the exhibition segment of the event, which included AIDS-3D, Craig Baldwin, Zoe Beloff, Lindsay Brown, Erik Bünger, Jim Campbell, Center for Tactical Magic, Susan Collins, Bill Domonkos, The Einstein's Brain Project, F18, Atelier Hauert/Reichmuth/Boehm, Christoph Keller, Julien Maire, Tatjana Marusic, Jane D. Marsching, Shusha Niederberger, Ruth Sergel, Harm van den Dorpel, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, and Patrick Ward. The theme for this year was “Magic. Tech-Evocations and Assumptions of Paranormal Realities.” In the clip, keep an eye out for F18’s robotic installation Living Kitchen - Happy End of the 21st Century (2006) which transforms a suburban kitchen into a scene reminiscent of Poltergeist.

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Dot Matrix Synth (2003) - Paul Slocum

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The user presses buttons on an attached control interface to play different notes. As the printer is played, it's also printing a set of images that are programmed into the printer's EPROM with the software.

The printer creates sound from the print head firing pins against the paper and the vibration of the stepper motor driving the print head back and forth. To generate different notes, the software adjusts the frequency of the printing process. Higher pitches tend to come from the firing of the pins against the paper, and lower pitches come from the rattle of driving the stepper motor.

The external eight-button interface plugs into the printer's font cartridge port. Each button has an assigned pitch, and pressing multiple buttons simultaneously activates the arpeggiator that quickly cycles through the notes you are holding down. The software also has the ability to run without the button interface, using the three buttons on the printer's front panel instead.

There is interaction between the images and music. The image dithering patterns fluctuate depending on what notes are played, and the music's volume and rhythmic patterns change depending on the pattern in the current horizontal section of the image. The printer can store about three pages of black and white images which print in order and then repeat.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S DESCRIPTION

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Plink Jet (2008) - Lesley Flanigan and Andrew Doro

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Plink Jet is like an elaborate electric guitar made from the motors and mechanical components of inkjet printers. It can play itself independently or be played by a person.

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Printershake/Earthquake (2007/2008) - Joe Winter

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Printershake/Earthquake (Concentric Circles), 2007/2008 (8.5" x 11", shown with detail. Image courtesy of the artist.)

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Printershake/Earthquake (Performance Documentation), 2007/2008 (Image courtesy of the artist.)

For this project, artist Joe Winter aggressively shakes a computer printer during the process of printing. The movement creates the above colorful effect.

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Growth Rendering Device (2007) - David Bowen

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This system provides light and food in the form of hydroponic solution for the plant. The plant reacts to the device by growing. The device in-turn reacts to the plant by producing a rasterized inkjet drawing of the plant every twenty-four hours. After a new drawing is produced the system scrolls the roll of paper approximately four inches so a new drawing can be produced during the next cycle. This system is allowed to run indefinitely and the final outcome is not predetermined.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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Nonmonumental

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Wendeltrap by Miriam Ellen Ewers (from nonmonument.com)

Created by artist Peter Baldes's Electronic Strategies Class at Virginia Commonwealth University, nonmonument.com is a collection of 3D models tagged with geolocation data and viewed in Google Earth. The project uses Google Earth to introduce impossible and possible interventions and objects in that space, and it plays with the program's claim to represent reality. In a communication with me, Baldes stated that these nonmonuments be thought of "...as real, at their own resolution." He sees the works as a unique form of public art and/or graffiti that "exist in a different layer of our reality." His class has opened up the forum to submissions as well, and visitors are invited to submit their own nonmonument.

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bambam (2009) - Peter Luining

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Arbores Laetae (Joyful Trees) (2008) - Diller, Scofidio + Renfro

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Consisting of 17 vibrant hornbeam trees formally planted in a grid pattern, at the heart of this landscape three trees will slowly rotate. In place of the familiar movement of shade according to the rotation of the earth around the sun, here shade migrates at an artificial speed, transforming the familiar patterns of the natural world into artificial creations.

-- FROM THE PROJECT DESCRIPTION FOR THE 2008 LIVERPOOL BIENNIAL

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Dervish (2004-2005) - Jennifer Steinkamp

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Dimensions: size variable, horizontal: 8 - 12 feet high x 10.6 - 16 feet wide Equipment: Equipment: 5000+ lumen projectors, 1 PC computer. (Photo credit: Robert Wedemeyer, courtesy Lehmann Maupin)

Dervish consists of four high definition projections of individual trees with twirling branches. This was inspired by a ritual practiced by the priests, or dervishes, of the Mevlavi sect of Islam. In the midst of a trance, the dervishes whirl in a motion symbolizing the soul's release from earthly ties and communication with the divine. The movement of the branches contains elements of both control and lawlessness -- while the whirling motion of the trees is fanciful and seemingly enchanted, the movement is limited by the roots of the trees.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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one art (2006) - Anya Gallaccio

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Weeping cherry tree, bolts, aircraft cable. (Courtesy the artist and SculptureCenter.)

For one art, Gallaccio will fell and disassemble a tree and then reconstruct it with all the engineering required to support it visible. The tree, a weeping cherry killed when contractors erroneously cut its root system, will reach into SculptureCenter's fifty-foot-high clerestory, virtually filling the space with its branches. Viewers will enter the space under its branches and will only be able to apprehend the full tree when standing at the far end of the gallery fifty feet away.

The title of the work is borrowed from an Elizabeth Bishop poem whose subject is loss and the unlikely possibility that we might master it through artful practice. one art is a tree as assisted ready-made, building on the art historical tradition of landscape and grappling with our desire to believe in an untamed nature.

In one art, Gallaccio's aesthetic act is to move the tree from its normal outdoor environment to an urban industrial building adapted as an exhibition space. Yet the process of disassembling and rebuilding the tree transforms it - drawing attention to the extraordinary formal and structural properties of the tree.

-- FROM THE DESCRIPTION FOR THE EXHIBITION OF "ONE ART" AT SCULPTURE CENTER (JANUARY 8- APRIL 3, 2006)

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