Posts for March 2009

Grace Murray Hopper on 60 Minutes (1982)

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Female Extension (1997) - Cornelia Sollfrank

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Images: Sample work by fictitious female artists from Cornelia Sollfrank, Female Extension, 1997

Female Extension is perhaps one of the more renown pranks within the history of net.art. For the project, artist Cornelia Sollfrank submitted more than 200 applications by fictitious female artists to the net.art competition EXTENSION sponsored by Galerie der Gegenwart (Gallery of Contemporary Art) of the Hamburger Kunsthalle (Hamburg Art Museum). She created not only a name, email address, phone number, and address for each applicant, but an example of original net.art work as well. Despite the disproportionate number of submissions by female artists, only male artists were selected as finalists. After the decision was announced, Sollfrank went public with the spoof.

Check the website for Female Extension which contains documentation from the project, including an interview with Sollfrank as well as a list of links to the art works she created for the applications.

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Real-Time Legend

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Image: Sonia Sheridan, Color-in-Color I, II/Sonia Sheridan, 1970

Let's admit it. Many of us have done it. You simply lift the lid on the photocopier, press your face (or other body part) against the glass, and hit "print." Sonia Sheridan has made an art out of this form of self-portraiture. The phenomenon of artists using the oft-overlooked tools around them is one with a long tradition. Think of Lillian Schwartz and the computers that surrounded her at Bell Labs, or Sadie Benning and the toy camera her father, James Benning, gave her. The list is long. And there's something about the convergence of play and experimentation that has made work like this a locus for forwarding new media. In Sheridan's case, it's partly a result of a deep attunement to the relationship between industrial methods and creative drives that has persisted for over sixty years. She was the beneficiary of a 3M residency program which allowed her to make work with equipment like their Thermo-Fax and Color-in-Color machines. In the legendary Jack Burnham-curated exhibition, "Software" (Jewish Museum, 1969), Sheridan allowed viewers to play with these machines, as well. The resultant work enabled her to comment on the compression of time in the conception-to-realization process, positioning her as an early theorist of "real time" art-making and communication. Meanwhile, her art projects helped establish the aesthetics of electronic graphics, while simultaneously pushing the formal boundaries (light, line, color) of seemingly simple systems and drawing these experiments into more and more complex generative systems. Like many artists of her generation opening up new tools, the body became a common site of investigation, and the images she continues to make reflect the metamorphosis of the body in relationship to machines. The Daniel Langois Foundation maintains an extensive archive on ...

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(Bounce Room 2) (2009) - Michael Guidetti

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ARTIST'S STATEMENT N0. 45,730,944: THE PERFECT ARTISTIC WEB SITE (2001) - Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries

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A Studio Visit with Gareth Long

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Last week, I met with artist Gareth Long at his Brooklyn apartment for a studio visit. I first became aware of his work through another artist Tyler Coburn, who wrote about him for Rhizome. After training in video for many years, Long turned to sculpture as a means to push video's formal qualities, illuminating the porousness of the category in relation to other mediums. His renderings of video into alternate forms, such as lenticular prints or digitally fabricated sculptures, often succumb to the faulty interpretations and limitations found in the slippage between languages. His book-based works pick up on this topic, functioning as artifacts of mistranslation.

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The Rhizome 50,000 Dollar Webpage!

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As a run up to our annual Benefit (mark your calendars: May 28th), we've launched the Rhizome 50,000 Dollar Webpage today, a new initiative in homage to one of the web's great memes, "The Million Dollar Homepage". Equal parts fundraiser, art collaboration, billboard, classified ad and community builder "The Rhizome 50,000 Dollar Webpage" aims to raise 50,000 dollars for Rhizome by selling 1,000,000 pixels of webspace at 5 cents per pixel.

The Webpage builds upon Rhizome's 13-year history as a community website dedicated to internet art, while providing important funds to a non-profit organization at a crucial time. Participants are able to promote an idea or project--be it art, an organization, a band, a blog, a store, etc-- at a multitude of tax-deductible price points and, at the same time, contribute to a collaborative picture that will remain live on the web in perpetuity as part of Rhizome's archive.

As with the original Million Dollar Homepage, the success of The Rhizome 50,000 Dollar Webpage relies on the involvement of individuals from every corner of the web. It will endure as a snapshot of art, design and collaboration in 2009 and, pixel purchase permitting, help stabilize and sustain a non-profit organization in a challenging economic climate.

Pixels are available for purchase from now until the evening of Rhizome's annual Benefit (again: Thursday, May 28th 2009). On this date, the page will be locked and presented at the Benefit which will be held at the New Museum in New York.

To purchase pixels, or check in on the progress of the site please visit http://www.rhizome.org/50k

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SelfControl (2009) - Steve Lambert

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Is email a distraction? SelfControl is an OS X application which blocks access to incoming and/or outgoing mail servers and websites for a predetermined period of time. For example, you could block access to your email, facebook, and twitter for 90 minutes, but still have access to the rest of the web. Once started, it can not be undone by the application or by restarting the computer - you must wait for the timer to run out.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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Untitled (1997) - Dieter Kiessling

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The video cameras record each other. The images are mixed digitally and transmitted to the monitor.

Via Constant Dullaart

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In the Future-Past Tense

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The fantasy of the future and the utopian promises of new technologies have always gone hand-in-hand. If the history of technology's evolution tells the story of our culture, we can also trace our present-day novelties back to the root of our anxieties about the future and the problems these devices hoped to solve. With this correlation in mind, the interactive DVD novel The Imaginary 20th Century (2007) by Norman Klein, Margo Bistis, and Andreas Kratky, jumps back to the fin de siècle era between the 19th and 20th centuries. It was a time of wonder when new technologies and their representation were wedded in documents like panoramic films of public light shows and short actualities about newfangled transportation devices called roller skates. The novel tells the story of "the Chicago World's Fair in 1893, and the story of a woman (Carrie), who in 1901, selects four men to seduce her, each with his own version of the new century" in a recombinatory visual narrative that overlaps 2,200 images culled from primary documents, architectural plans, photos, and other ephemera with an original score. The project speaks to the multiplicity of visions circulating about what the new century would hold, and it's an even more past-tense follow-up to Norman Klein's interactive novel, Bleeding Through: Layers of Los Angeles, 1920-1986 (2003). Klein's work has clearly resonated with at least eleven people, because closing this week at Otis College of Art and Design's Ben Maltz Gallery is "The Future Imaginary," an exhibition that responds to The Imaginary 20th Century with the work of artists Deborah Aschheim, Jeff Cain, Tom Jennings, Jon Kessler, Ed Osborn, Lea Rekow, Douglas Repetto, Phil Ross, Kari Rae Seekins and Aaron Drake, and Susan Simpson. Each contribution embodies the special genre of ...

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