Posts for June 2009

1st Movement (2009) - Hayley Silverman

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Analog to Digital

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When television stations in the U.S. switched to digital broadcasting last Friday, viewers across the country documented the event and uploaded it to YouTube. There is something curiously surreal about these grainy videos of television screens switching to static, taped in people's homes on cell phones and digital cameras, only to be posted on YouTube moments later. The novelty of their circulation itself - a historic transition from analog to digital television captured on digital video and then transmitted online - speaks to the media environment we inhabit with accidental precision.









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Ancient Pixels (2009) - Jose A. Olivares

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Ancient Pixels ITP Spring Show 2009 from Jose Olivares on Vimeo.


Ancient Pixels is my current work in progress where lo-resolution video game graphics, Andean textile art and psychedelic poster art are merged produce the visual aesthetic and the grammar blocks (via Andean symbol interpretation) of a multi-channel interactive video installation depicting scenes of an imaginary Inca temple. The installation is made up of several components such as "animated rugs", immersive video walls and sculptural pieces.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S SITE

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On Tour

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Image: Notice on the site of the Slovenian Ministry of Foreign Affairs

This month I’m traveling through southeastern Europe from Venice to Athens, where I’m looking at art and blogging. Part one of the travelogue is about Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Before the Internet Pavilion, there was the first meeting of nettime at the 1995 Venice Biennale. Vuk Ćosić, one of the core participants, told me about it over lunch in Ljubljana last week. Internet theorists and artists gathered for three days of discussion just upstairs from Club Berlin, a non-stop rave where art stars worked the bar. “I remember Joseph Kosuth handing me a beer,” Ćosić said.

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Image: Luka Prinčič

The rave was a recurring theme of the four days I spent in Slovenia, and there seemed to be more to it than the Slavs’ enduring love for techno. My visit happened to coincide with the opening night of Sonica, a sound art festival, and the kickoff featured Andi Studer and Matt Spendlove’s Netaudio Ping Pong, where two players build dance music by taking turns at composing four-bar phrases on mixers installed on two ends of a ping-pong table. Škuc, a gallery that has been showcasing progressive art since 1978, was hosting a “live archive” of Slovenian video art from the 1980s and 1990s, and I spent an hour watching works by Mirko Simic, including distillations of his veejay acts at parties fifteen years ago. On Wednesday night, Luka Prinčič performed at a small theater in a university’s basement; between the somber, wordy beginning and end, he danced himself into a sweat wearing silver tights and sparkling tank top. The next night, after a presentation at Kiberpipa where he demonstrated his Puredata modification that introduces elements of probability to the dance tracks he writes to accompany his ...

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"The World Is Flat" Rhizome at X Initiative's No Soul For Sale: A Festival of Independents

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Image: "The World Is Flat" Poster by David Horvitz

“The World Is Flat”

Rhizome at X Initiative’s No Soul For Sale: A Festival of Independents

June 24 - 28, 2009, 1-9 pm
Opening reception: June 23, 6-9 pm

548 West 22nd Street
New York, NY 10011

Free to the public.

Rhizome is pleased to present "The World Is Flat," an exhibition to be included in X Initiative’s No Soul For Sale: A Festival of Independents. Featured artists and collectives include B'L'ing (Chris Moukarbel, Anne Eastman, Amy Yao), Anna Lundh, Oliver Laric, Lizzie Fitch, Alexandre Singh and David Horvitz. Two artist-centered publications, Private Circulation and Free Internet by AIDS-3D, will also be displayed. The exhibition takes the perceived flatness of culture, or the free availability and distribution of information enabled by the Internet, as its departure point. Works included celebrate this availability, such as Oliver Laric’s Touch My Body (Green Screen Version) (2008), a green screen template of Mariah Carey’s hit song which was remixed widely by YouTube users, or B'L'ing’s bootleg trading station and video RGB (2008), while others reveal paranoid fantasies that have emerged in response to increased accessibility of information, as in Anna Lundh’s Hollywood Internet (2008), a video installation that compiles footage from Hollywood films that represent the Internet as a threatening decentralized network. “The World Is Flat” includes installation, collage, sculpture, video as well as internet-based works along with a limited, reading library and a poster. Events include the HEXA_FLEXAGON_F_EVER workshop/performance by Anna Lundh on Saturday June 27th from 2-3pm on the first floor, which will walk participants through the process of hexaflexagon construction and present a short history of the hexaflexagons in the form of a corporate seminar. The workshop is an extension of the ...

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Shine II (2009) - Billy Rennekamp

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laptop, photobooth, projector

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Dial-A-Poem (1968) - John Giorno

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"After having a conversation on the phone with Burroughs in 1968, Giorno initiated the Dial-A-Poem Poets concept, which he claimed would later influence the creation of information services creation over the telephone, such as sports and stock market. Fifteen phone lines were connected with individual answering machines: people would call Giorno Poetry Systems and listen to a poem they were offered from fragments of various live recordings. Dial-A-Poem, from 1969 on, was very successful, with 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 8.30 p.m. to 11.30 p.m. peaks. GPS used a variety of social issues at the time, what with the sexual revolution and the Vietnam War, which would create appeal as well as shock from the reactive community.

-- FROM THE GIORNO POETRY SYSTEMS WIKIPEDIA


Listen to Selections from Giorno Poetry Systems on UBU

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Twitter SK8 (2009) - JODI

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Wireless Keyboard / Skateboards Streaming to Twitter

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"The World Is Flat" Opens Tonight at X Initiative's No Soul For Sale

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X-initiative's No Soul For Sale: A Festival of Independents opens tonight at 6pm. The festival is free and open to the public, runs until June 28th, and will be open everyday from 1-9pm. For the festival, X-initiative invited over 30 separate non-profit arts organizations, alternative institutions, and artists' collectives from all over the world to take over the space at 548 West 22nd Street in New York with performances, screenings, exhibitions, lectures and more.

Rhizome is pleased to be one of the invitees this year, and for the festival staff members Lauren Cornell, Brian Droitcour and Ceci Moss curated an exhibition entitled "The World Is Flat". Located on the second floor of the 548 West 22nd Street space, the show will bring together a selection of works that engage the free availability and distribution of information enabled by the Internet. Featured artists and collectives include B'L'ing (Chris Moukarbel, Anne Eastman, Amy Yao), Anna Lundh, Oliver Laric, Lizzie Fitch, Alexandre Singh and David Horvitz. Two artist-centered publications, Private Circulation and Free Internet by AIDS-3D, will be on display as well. An event with artist Anna Lundh is also scheduled on Saturday June 27th from 2-3pm on the first floor. Lundh will conduct a workshop/performance based around her work HEXA_FLEXAGON_F_EVER (2008) that will walk participants through the process of hexaflexagon construction and present a short history of the hexaflexagons in the form of a corporate seminar. If you live in New York, come by and visit. For those who can't make it, we will be blogging from the festival all this week, conducting mini-interviews with fellow exhibitors and snapping shots of all the activity.

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Futurespeak

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Shane Hope’s sprawling prints can’t be processed with one or two looks. They are built on thousands of tiny details, rather than around a single focal point, and as the eye travels across the picture field, it sees lines and pieces accumulating in recognizable bodies and then collapsing into chaos, or maybe an order that can’t be discerned by the naked eye. Hope calls them Molecular Modeling prints, or “Mol Mods,” and they are informed by his belief that “the molecule is the brushstroke of the future”—that nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on a molecular scale, will transform industry sometime soon. For now, Hope’s tools are coding languages Python and Perl. Because of the Mol Mods’ size he can only work on one screen-sized swath at a time, and because of their complexity, that is all that can be rendered even on Hope’s homemade desktop, which he proudly calls "faster than any factory-built Mac on the planet."

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