Posts for January 2009

Talk Around the Clock

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Image: Schedule for 24-Hour Program on the Concept of Time

Tonight at 6 p.m. the Guggenheim presents a marathon symposium titled "24-Hour Program on the Concept of Time." The museum's chief curator Nancy Spector organized the event in the mold of Hans Ulrich Obrist, who has presided over similar symposia in other cities, most recently a "mini-marathon" in Beijing on New Year's Eve that lasted a measly 12 hours. Like its predecessors, the 24-Hour Program is presented in an art-world context but brings together thinkers across many disciplines. Tonight's (and tomorrow's) lineup of speakers includes Ronald Mallett, a physicist who has devoted his life to building a time machine, and Joseph LeSauteur, an expert in the psychology of circadian rhythms. Also slated to participate are Philippe Parreno, Angela Bulloch, and Liam Gillick, artists featured in the exhibition upstairs whose run will end when the symposium does. "theanyspacewhatever" is about ten artists who emerged in the 1990s, but it doesn't show any 1990s art. Instead, it comprises new installations conceived specifically for the Guggenheim's rotunda. That should give a clue about these artists' attitude toward temporality. Over their careers they have avoided producing static, stand-alone objects, which are doomed to become relics or fetishes over time, while proposing that art lies in the viewer's reception of a proposition made by the artist at a specific place and time. Obrist conceived his experimental symposia with a similar sensibility -- which makes sense, since he is of the same generation and matured in the same intellectual milieu -- but when "theanyspacewhatever" turned out to be so undemanding that it was largely written off by many as a bore, one wonders what the artists will have to say about the marathon's punishing spatial and temporal parameters -- respectively ...

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Time After Time

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Image: A Tag's Life (screenshot)

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Image: World At Work (screenshot)

An almost all too perfect follow-up to the 24 Hour Program at the Guggenheim this evening, this online exhibition hosted by Utrecht's Impakt also examines time, but through the lens of the internet. Time and technology have a long history together, a fact the curatorial statement acknowledges, and "It's About Time" organized by Sabine Niederer shifts its focus to the present with two projects that specifically attend to the contemporary reality of the web (such as 2.0 technologies) and time. The first, titled A Tag's Life and produced by the team George Holsheimer, Mirjam ter Linden, Daan Odijk, Patri Sadiqah, and Raoul Siepers, indicates trends by visualizing the lifespan of tags used on Flickr over time. The tendencies that emerge are generally expected, like the exponential use of the tags "politics" and "Obama" around this year's U.S. Presidential election. With the plethora of data visualization projects out there, this one isn't exactly groundbreaking, but could prove to be a useful tool to access Flickr. Unfortunately, you must "suggest" tags in order to generate graphs, which limits one's ability to take full advantage of the site. The second project, World At Work by Theo Deutinger, extends the boundaries of the clock to include both the macro level of the universe and the micro level of the working day on Earth. The site opens up on the Milky Way, and the visitor must zero in on Earth in order to draw up the number of people globally working 9-5 shifts by location. By showing how many people in the world are at work simultaneously, the site reveals the rhythm of labor worldwide, at any given moment. Deutinger, an architect, created the project as ...

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Request (2004) - zefrank

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More work by zefrank

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Loveletters (1952) - Christopher Strachey

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Christopher Strachey's computer generated Loveletter program executed in its orginal form using the Manchester Mark 1 emulator by David Link.

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Setting the Tome

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In the early seventies Gerald O'Grady, a professor of English Literature at the State University of New York in Buffalo, was asked to become director of the euphemistically titled "Educational Communications Center." The division was to provide technical support for the entire campus. Sensing a thankless administrative appointment he agreed, but only if he could simultaneously create and direct a department dedicated to the study of emerging media, one that would provide artists and filmmakers access to these technologies and a theoretical basis from which to explore it fully. Thus, the Center for Media Studies (MediaStudy/Buffalo) was formed. Groundbreaking in its scope and focus, the faculty included filmmakers Hollis Frampton, Tony Conrad, Paul Sharits, and James Blue, video artists Steina and Woody Vasulka, and Peter Weibel. The book Buffalo Heads: Media Study, Media Practice, Media Pioneers, 1973-1990, edited by Woody Vasulka and Peter Weibel, thoroughly documents the people and activities that were a part of this highly influential center. Part exhibition catalog (a similarly titled exhibition "Mind Frames: Media Study at Buffalo 1973-1990" was mounted at ZKM in 2007), part catalog raisonné, and part coffee table book, and coming in at 837 pages and almost 10 lbs, it could be called the definitive text on this place and period.

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Thank You From Rhizome

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We are pleased to report that Rhizome reached and exceeded our annual Campaign goal of $30,000. We are truly grateful that the community we strive to support year-round mobilized for us during a critical time. Proceeds from this Campaign will keep our services to the field thriving during a challenging year ahead. From everyone at Rhizome, thank you! Every single person who contributed made a great impact on Rhizome and our commitment to emerging artistic practices engaged with technology.

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ZigZagPhilosophy.com (2009) - Angelo Plessas

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More work by Angelo Plessas

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Art From the Middle of Nowhere

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Image: Paul D. Miller, NORTH/SOUTH (loop), 2008

Paul D. Miller, the artist, remix theorist, and DJ parenthetically known as DJ Spooky, is among the latest flood of artists to take interest in Antarctica. Representing the world's highest, driest, and coldest desert, the often misunderstood continent lured some of the film medium's earliest documentarians who were in search of something new and continues to entice new media artists concerned about its disappearance. Those who are liberal in their use of the word "remix" might say that this long-contested territory is now being remixed. In a sad twist of irony, the continent with no permanent residents has fallen victim to the environmental effects of global human pollution. Paul Miller's work grows out of DJ culture and a love of music, but has in recent years been concerned with the evolving relationship between media and culture. In 2004 he remixed Birth of a Nation, D. W. Griffith's white supremacist feature film that nonetheless propelled cinema as an art form. In his new North/South installation, the artist responds to material ranging from filmic narratives about polar expeditions to John Cage's Imaginary Landscape #1 (1938)--which he cites as the first-ever turntable composition--to tell his own story about Antarctica. The work exhibited is presented as an acoustic interpretation of the continent's place in international politics, and the "Great Game" of national interests as states claim territory and define their identity. A timely topic, considering Russia planted a flag in the North Pole's seabed to claim the natural resources underneath it. The show opens tonight at New York's Robert Miller Gallery. - Marisa Olson

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Creative Capital Announces 2009 Grantees

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The Creative Capital Foundation, long supporters of the field of art and technology, just announced their grantees for the 2009 cycle. The non-profit awarded quite a few artists within the "emerging fields" category this year, many of whom Rhizome has worked with or covered in the past. You can read more about their individual projects on Creative Capital's site. For now, we would like to congratulate Matthew Coolidge (Center for Land Use Interpretation), Cesar Cornejo, James Coupe, Beatriz da Costa, eteam, Futurefarmers (Amy Franceschini), Jonathan Meuser and Michael Swaine, Catherine Herdlick, Shih Chieh Huang, Lisa Jevbratt, neuroTransmitter (Angel Nevarez and Valerie Tevere), Richard Pell, Stephanie Rothenberg, Mark Shepard, Karolina Sobecka and Sam Van Aken.

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A young man who secretly loves me (2008) - Hagiwara Shunya

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Via Damon Zucconi

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