Posts for August 2009

Light Towers (2009) - Thomas Galloway

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Call For Work

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Taking as its premise the idea that limitations can catalyze creativity, Rhizome & OpenProcessing co-present Tiny Sketch, a 200 Character Processing Competition that will run until September 13, 2009, 11:59pm.

Tiny Sketch is an open challenge to artists and programmers to create the most compelling creative work possible with the programming language Processing using 200 characters or less.

The winner will be determined by Rhizome's membership through an open vote that will take place between Monday, September 14th to Sunday, September 20th. The winner will be announced on Rhizome.org and OpenProcessing.org and awarded a prize of $200.00 (US). All sketches that are submitted to this competition will be included in the collection page and archived collectively in Rhizome's ArtBase.

Rules & Regulations

1. Your sketch code must not exceed 200 characters in length. (Including Spaces)

2. Your sketch must work properly over the internet on a web browser.

3. Your sketch is limited to the core functions of Processing.

4. No external libraries or external files are allowed.

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Evil Interiors (2003) - Palle Torsson

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Evil Interiors is a series of sixteen digital prints that depict the sets of some of the key scenes in film history: the home of the old man in Clockwork Orange, the hotel corridor in Shining, the empty warehouse in Reservoir Dogs, the motel room in Psycho, Hannibal Lecter's cage in The Silence of the Lambs. Using the editor in Unreal Tournament 2003, Torsson worked painstakingly on the architecture and on texture of the various parts of the furnishings to make these polygonal reconstructions totally believable.

"These images point at the psychological dimensions of violence, at least those that are imprinted in collective memory. As we live in a society where violence is accepted and ritualized our own consciousness is full of images of violence which can be triggered by a digital architectural space. Violence is not actually depicted here, but it certainly exists in the eye and mind of the beholder," Torsson explains.

-- FROM AN ESSAY ON "EVIL INTERIORS" BY DOMENICO QUARANTA IN "GAMESCENES: ART IN THE AGE OF VIDEOGAMES"

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Civilization 2.0

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When introducing digital art to an unfamiliar audience, every piece becomes a manifesto of its own - it simultaneously informs, provokes and educates the viewer. When East London gallery SEVENTEEN put up "Intentional Computing", Paul B. Davis’ first ever solo show in 2007, this was precisely the challenge it faced. In Britain’s oddly conservative art scene, the show acted as a demonstration of the infinite possibilities and theorization of digital creativity. A brief retrospective of one of London’s most adventurous galleries brings out the problems such artists face as well as the complexities technology- savvy audiences are learning to incorporate into their viewing experience.

“Much of the work we began to show at SEVENTEEN was at first alien to people in London,” says Paul Pieroni, co-curator of SEVENTEEN, who had been a fan of Davis’ work with the collective, BEIGE, for years: “I liked the fact that it takes technology not on face value, but in terms of its place within a more diffuse contemporary culture.” "Intentional Computing" featured some of Davis’ NES hacks, as well as glitchy, pixelated videos, reminiscent of the artist’s early encounters with technology. It also raised debates about issues of commodity and reclamation. By quoting recurring parts of his technological environment past and present, including the computer games (Nintendo et al) of his youth, Davis was rejuvenating a practice innovated by major pop artists such as Eduardo Paolozzi’s work in the early 50s as well as his later mosaics, or Richard Hamilton’s famous collages.

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Mayan Pyramid I and Mayan Pyramid II (2009) - VERSELEY

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From the series "About The Field Of Statistics"

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Beg Waves (2008) - Ponytail

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Portofino (2009) - Teengirl Fantasy

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Sound Design

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Image: Photo of Chris Watson's Microphone (Source: Chris Watson's site)

Michael Guidetti recently released the fifth edition of Skeleton Sweep, a collaborative podcast collage of field recordings and found sound. The project’s poetic title accommodates an array of meanings, from the artist’s embrace of the fleshless quality of sound on an mp3 to the wide-ranging breadth of the material’s origins. Volume 5 includes recordings as diverse as a mother’s affectionate voicemail message, wind chimes, percussive music made with knives, and black boxes of crashed planes.

Skeleton Sweep grew out of Guidetti’s longtime interest in field recordings. Before compiling Volume 1 in March 2007, he mailed a micro-recorder back and forth with a friend living in Japan, to share the sounds of their surroundings. As a serious hobbyist, Guidetti uses high-quality equipment for his own recordings—a Sony DAT walkman with an Audio-Technica stereo mic—but relishes juxtapositions of various qualities of sound. Skeleton Sweep welcomes unsolicited submissions from amateurs but also includes the work of experts, so a volume might take sound off lo-fi cassettes and cell phones as well as pieces by Chris Watson or Toshiya Tsunoda; Volume 4 even has excerpts of compositions by David Tudor and Robert Ashley. Contributors are given credit on the Skeleton Sweep site in a list labeled “Info,” though the term is a bit of an exaggeration, as the barebones descriptions of content on the list often generate more questions than they answer. In any case, when a chorus of witch cackles, a blanket of crickets, and chirping ringtones succeed each other in an early stretch of Volume 5, the connections an active listener draws between those noises—and the nuanced differences of each file’s silence—matter more than the relationship between a sound and ...

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Call for Participation

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The Netherlands Media Art Institute is seeking artists for their residency program in the 2010 cycle. The deadline for applications is September 1, 2009. Read more about the opportunity below, or visit the original call on their website.

The Artist in Residence (AiR) programme at the Netherlands Media Art Institute supports the exploration and development of new work in digital/interactive/network media and technology based arts practice. The residency provides time and resources to artists in a supportive environment to facilitate the creation of new work that is produced from an open source perspective. We encourage a cross disciplinary and experimental approach. This is a practice based residency designed to enable the development and completion of a new work.

The ideal candidate will have a broad understanding of contemporary art and theory, as well as media history and visual culture and should have knowledge of requested software, as well as understanding of programming. The artist's intention should be to make a new artwork, to be shown in exhibitions and to be distributed by the Netherlands Media Art Institute and others. (We do not demand exclusivity for presentation or distribution.)

For the AiR program 2010 we manly focus on technology and mobility that can change habits and inhabitation of public spaces. Our goal is to explore mobile and portable platforms as innovative creation and distribution systems. Proposals for users participation and interaction by modified excistend devices as phones, iPod, GPS and others are welcome.

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Explorations in Psychedelic (2009) - teenocide

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From the series "Explorations in Psychedelic"

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