Posts for May 2008

HOAGY HOUGHTON

(0)

While his personal website is still forthcoming, the handful of Hoagy's work currently available is superb. Especially the pictured project, a collection of random compositions made by mapping notes to the colours in a collection of simple geometric images. www.gdi08.co.uk/hoagy-houghton

MORE »

Originally posted on It's Nice That - Blog by Rhizome


Pictionary Poetics

(0)

The newest exhibition organized by Threshold Artspace Curator Iliyana Nedkova, "Primary Ingredients" at Perth's Horsecross Gallery, seeks to challenge the supposed superiority of words over images as a means of communication. She calls it "A fresh opportunity to test our assumptions that words have cognitive primacy in the brain of the viewer." The show will premiere five new commissioned works by new media veterans Vuk Cosic, Alec Finlay, Clive Gillman, Katja Loher, and Valentin Stefanoff, and will be shown together with works by Perry Bard and Krassimir Terziev. Threshold represents Scotland's only permanent new media art collection so it makes sense that Nedkova would invite these artists to respond to twelve pieces in the collection of their host institution. Cosic revisits his signature style of converting classic moving image works to ASCII text, this time shining the spotlight on King Kong. His contribution is posited as a precursor to his solo show in the space, next year. Clive Gillman takes the 22 video channels of Threshold's permanent Wave installation and translates them into 22 letters, each addressing the bonds and pacts made between artists and their audiences. Perry Bard opens up this relationship by inviting anyone to join him in uploading video shots that constitute a databased remake of Dziga Vertov's classic self-reflexive film, The Man with the Movie Camera. Other works in the show further push the translation envelope, their wrks floating between visual poetry and literary images. "Primary Ingredients" is up through August 31st. - Marisa Olson

Image: Vuk Cosic, Kong Kong ASCII, 2008.

MORE »


Math Goddess

(0)


Despite the fact the art world is rife with gender discrimination, a situation only compounded by historic barriers thwarting women's entree to computing, the title "Grande Dame of Digital Art" is one for which a host of pioneering artists could vie. Nonetheless, Berlin gallery [DAM] believes this designation belongs to Vera Molnar, whose experimental Plotter drawings will be exhibited at the space May 30th-July 12th. Made between 1969-1990, these color and black and white geometric images were preceded by her invention, in 1959, of a "Machine Imaginaire," a surreal algorithmic generator that presaged aesthetic computing by many years. The artist was a contemporary of Paul Klee and shared in his generation's fascination with systems. However, in a witty essay entitled "1% Disorder," she made clear that there is always an open space for chaos and creativity-- not unlike what Freud called "the naval" of the dream. It is this open space that allowed her to bring a human warmth to the rigidity of the mathematical languages she admired, like her own fever dream resulting from infection by what she called the "virus of visual experimentation." - Marisa Olson


Image: Vera Molnar, (Des)Ordres ((Un)Ordnungen), 1974

Link »

MORE »


Jeff Bailey Gallery: Making History -- Thursday, May 29, 6 - 8PM

(0)

Jeff Bailey Gallery

511 West 25th Street, Suite 207

Chelsea

A.J. Bocchino, Washington Post (1975), 2007, marker on paper, 30" x 40"


Jeff Bailey Gallery is pleased to announce Making History, a group exhibition curated by Yaelle Amir and featuring the work of seven artists: Paolo Arao, A.J. Bocchino, Ramak Fazel, Shaun O'Dell, Sarah Trigg, Anna Von Mertens and Martin Wilner.

With the general election rapidly approaching, the country's rhetoric has shifted to express a need for departure from its previous ways. Making History revisits the narratives upon which our nation was founded, and reflects on what it has ultimately become. Deriving their inspiration from history books, newspapers, and firsthand experiences, the seven participating artists have crafted novel portrayals of widely known events, ranging from as far back as the Gold Rush to the recent violent acts at Virginia Tech. Viewed collectively, the exhibition paints an increasingly grim picture of the state of our nation--inundated with violence and hostility, and a value system gone awry.

[CONTINUED]

MORE »

Originally posted on ArtCal Openings by Rhizome


Add-Art intro video

(0)

This video will give you a brief intro to Add-Art and demonstrate how to install the add-on to your Firefox browser. If you have any additional questions, check out the forums - http://forum.add-art.org.


Introduction to Add-Art from Steve Lambert on Vimeo.

Intro video Remix Contest on http://fffff.at - $100 prize.

MORE »

AddArt was a 2008 Rhizome Commission. Here's a short instructional video for the project.

Originally posted on Steve Lambert by Rhizome


Announcing Berkeley DMAX Blog

(0)


As an epicenter of the digital revolution, the San Francisco Bay Area is a buzzing hive of constant activity and energy around digital culture and art made possible by technological innovation. A critical feedback forum contributes to a thriving, evolving and intellectually playful cultural community. For this reason, the Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive's Digital Media Art Access and Exhibitions program (DMAX) and the UC Berkeley Center for New Media (BCNM) are hosting such a critical forum - in the form of the new DMAX blog - to sustain our community of thinkers.

This blog has a loose and flexible focus on: Bay Area regional / digital / art and culture. The regional focus supports a geo-physical community of familiar faces that already meets. The broad digital culture focus reflects the fact that this community spans many professional fields, creating a need for a different kind of apparatus from the traditional academic or art review.

Serving as a civic cultural forum for this broad and diverse community is a natural role for a public museum and a public university. In this spirit, this blog will not limit the public to behind-the-scenes comments, but will be open to public participation at all levels (top-level posts, comments, events) in addition to featuring bloggers drawn from the DMAX and BCNM programs. The DMAX Blog provides our community with a gathering place to let each other know what's going on, what people think, and what's next. Welcome home!

MORE »

Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


"Art in the Age of Terrorism" Panel, Steve Kurtz at Eyebeam Tonight

(0)

In a special panel hosted by Eyebeam, artist Steve Kurtz will speak openly tonight about his experience in federal court and the claims of bioterrorism filed against him. This is his first public appearance since his case was dismissed. He will be joined in discussion by science writer Carl Zimmer, bioethicist George Annas and author Eugene Thacker. The talk is free, open to the public, and it begins at 7pm. This event is co-organized by the 2008 World Science Festival and the Berkeley Center for New Media.


Link »


MORE »


The Tomorrow People

(6)


In his 1971 essay on post-Holocaust culture "In Bluebeard's Castle," George Steiner notes that in nineteenth-century Europe "an odd school of painting develops: pictures of London, Paris, or Berlin seen as colossal ruins, famous landmarks burnt, eviscerated, or located in weird emptiness among charred stumps and dead water." Comparing these visions to 20th century photographs of war-ravaged Warsaw and Dresden, he wonders "how strong a part of wish-fulfillment there was in these nineteenth-century intimations." Or self-criticism: Gustav Doré and Blanchard Jerrold's 1872 book London: A Pilgrimage depicts a dark metropolis teeming with the bodies of the poor, then ends with an eerily serene image of a future London, crumbling and overgrown like the remains of ancient Rome-- a urban memento mori. One recalls these European precedents while viewing the exhibit "AMERIKA: Back to the Future" at Postmasters Gallery in New York; the key to this tightly composed set of works lies in Jennifer and Kevin McCoy's Big Box (biosphere), a set of two miniature suburban landscapes. Each one depicts a typical American shopping mall, comprised of the facades of familiar chain stores and restaurants-- Chili's, Target, Bed Bath & Beyond, The Sports Authority and so on-- reconfigured into a circular structure that slowly rotates on a mechanical table (the exact order of the businesses taken directly from a specific mall in Nyack, New York). Tiny cameras feed live images to screens above, enlarging the scale models to strangely lifelike dimensions. In one part of the installation, the mall includes a mesh-wire dome at its center, overgrown with green moss and trees, with small plots of vegetables and flowers planted outside. In the other, the same structure, now hollow at its center, is burned and crumbling, surrounded by bloodstained human figures; letters have been torn off of logos ...

MORE »


Into the Void

(0)


Loss, reduction, vacancy and dissolution: all topical buzzwords the New York art world has come to expect from the emergent generation of European artists. After the Vincent Honoré-curated "From a Distance," at Wallspace in 2007, and artist Matt Saunders' group enterprise, Out Riding Fast, this past winter at Harris Lieberman -- both of which tipped the scales towards the Old World -- Foxy Production's current exhibition of seven continental practitioners feels a bit superfluous. Curated by English artist Dick Evans, "Nul" muddles through the post-historical morass, with many of its participants masquerading vintage modes of object- and image-making to little effect. Anders Clausen builds wooden pedestals and sculptural busts, in the fashion of Jacob Epstein, that lack the verve and ingenuity of similar works by contemporaries Steve Claydon and Matthew Monahan. Salvatore Arancio's photo-etchings rehash the type of psychically-fraught Gothic imagery that made its rounds on the market a few years past. More promising is the work of Lars Laumann (here only partially represented by a screen-print, entitled Hatful of Cocteau, of a posthumous article on Jean Cocteau), whose videos about Morrissey, Princess Diana and Eija Riitta Berliner-Mauer drew buzz at White Columns, in 2007, and most recently at this year's Berlin Biennial. Simone Gilges' installation also excites, with its oblique mix of photography and sculpture. Attempting to draw connections between her hanging curtain, framed piece of black silk and ornately framed photograph of a cupid statuette makes for the most interesting -- and irresolvable -- experience in the show. - Tyler Coburn


Image Credit: Simone Gilges, MATERIALPROBE II (SEIDE), 2008

Link »

MORE »


club internet

(0)



club internet is great. to flip through the site's collection of top-notch digital works click the magic wand on the top left of the page here.

[all from club internet. top to bottom: dyssconnect08011-2.gif by issac bigsby trogdon. ..._.~<[-/=^=->~.-... by petra cortright. game by anne de vries.]

MORE »

Originally posted on i heart photograph by Rhizome