Posts for March 2008

Feminist Art Takes the City

(0)

If cities are technologies in their own right, as many locative media artists have suggested, then Los Angeles is a supercomputer. Its infrastructure of automobiles and media spectacles has predetermined the levels of mobility, privacy, and personal interaction experienced by its inhabitants, and it's hard to imagine a public art project that could penetrate this facade. Milan-based Galleria Emi Fontana has created an initiative called West of Rome, whose most recent project breaks through this interpersonal barrier. Established in 2005, West of Rome is an LA-based program to consider the relationship between the audience and the city. They debuted by installing Olafur Eliasson's project, Meant to be Lived In (Today I'm feeling prismatic) (2005), in a "post-modern" suburban home, and the new "Women in the City" program brings ten works by artists Jenny Holzer, Barbara Kruger, Louise Lawler, and Cindy Sherman to the great outdoors. Sherman's Untitled Film Stills (1977-1980) (exhibited here on billboards) ought to be right at home so close to Hollywood, but they instead take on a new life by exiting the gallery-- one which underscores the ultimate isolation and masked humanity of female archetypes, by placing them among the roving masses, to be gazed at or not, as with any other billboard. Louise Lawler has reprised two older works. Birdcalls (1972-81) is a sound installation, presently installed at the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens, which mimics the sound of birds' mating calls in phonetically pronouncing the names of successful male artists. At the Aero theatre (the site of the work's original debut), Lawler screened A Movie (1979), a full-length feature film, shown sans picture, with only the soundtrack. Both works question the nature of display in contemporary art-- a query Lawler has successfully pushed into a variety of different ...

MORE »


Beat Poetry

(1)


Madison Square Park Conservancy described their calendar for this year as "ambitious" in their press release and, judging from the amount of coverage we've allotted their public art program in the Rhizome blog this week, this is certainly so. Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, the Montreal-based artist slated to present work in the park this November, gave an informative lecture about his upcoming project Pulse Park (2008) at the Parsons The New School for Design last week. The inspiration for Pulse Park came about during his wife's pregnancy, when the artist listened to the heartbeats of his twins for the first time. "We could hear how different the heartbeats were, and the pattern - the music - that was generated by the pulses was really fascinating," he reminisced. Imagine that rhythmic pattern scaled up one hundred times, and you'll have an idea of the scope of his proposal for the interactive light installation Pulse Park, which is set to transform the oval lawn of Manhattan's Madison Square Park into a complex matrix of throbbing lights in synchronization with the heartbeats of passersby. During his talk, he explained how this complex operation would function. Two hundred aircraft landing lights will surround the oval lawn, pointing toward the center; on the north and south sides of the lawn will be a computer-equipped stand with two cylindrical metal tubes. When a user grabs the tubes, a sensor picks up the heart rate as well as the amplitude and shape of the beat's waveform. The system translates those variables into a unique pulse of light, which appears in the first light to the left. When the next user records his heart rate, the first person's pulse moves one down the line along the perimeter, and so on. After a pulse has traveled all ...

MORE »


Schematic: Eric Raymond at Canada House

(0)

The Canadian High Commission requests the pleasure of your company at a private view of:

====================================
SCHEMATIC: ERIC RAYMOND

Thursday, April 24, 2008
18:30 - 20:30

A solo show presenting the work of the Montreal-based media artist, featuring his most striking robotic and electronic installations. Curated by Heather Corcoran, Michelle Kasprzak and Gillian McIver. Co-presented by Kinetica Museum.

Canada House
Trafalgar Square, Cockspur Street
London SW1Y 5BJ

[CONTINUED]

MORE »

Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


starburst variations 2

(0)

MORE »

Originally posted on tom moody by tom moody


Disruptive Media

(0)


Wisconsin-based media artist Sabine Gruffat is kicking up quite a storm at Deadtech with her current installation, 24 Hour Riot, running through Tuesday, April 15th - an impressive fact, given the Chicago gallery's reputation for boundary-pushing fare. Gruffat has outfitted the space with a responsive array of electronic noise machines and televised riot scenes, such that a viewer's movement randomly triggers disturbances in the video and soundtrack. The effect is one of total dislocation, as our arbitrary influence on these broadcasts generates a palpable awareness of the existing gaps between politics, mass-media, and spectatorship. On this level, 24 Hour Riot continues Gruffat's extensive look at the various, mobile units of the culture industry and provisionally asks the question of how the reality of our contemporary, mediatized lifestyle may actually provide a groundwork for new modes of political engagement. As with Head Lines: Hybrid Film Trilogy (2007), in which the artist ran New York Times articles through semi-automated, recombinatory processes to produce skittery, 16mm animations, 24 Hour Riot suggests that any program of change must first arise from a greater understanding of the normativized codes of information dispersal, and of the means by which said codes may be subverted, erased, or reassembled. - Tyler Coburn

Sabine Gruffat, 24 Hour Riot, 2008

Link »

MORE »


EcoArtTech in "Off The Grid"

(0)

EcoArtTech will be demonstrating their Environmental Risk Assessment Rover-- AT (see description below) at Purchase College, SUNY, Purchase, NY each evening at dusk on 3/27, 3/28, and 3/29, 2008.

Ecoarttech's ERAR-AT is part of the Neuberger Museum of Art's "Off the Grid" Exhibition, March 30 - June 1, 2008... -------------------------------
Environmental Risk Assessment Rover--AT, Version 1.0, 2008

"Sooner rather than later, one comes up against the law that so long as risks are not recognized scientifically, they do not exist--at least not legally, medically, technologically, or socially, and they are thus not prevented, treated or compensated for. No amount of collective moaning can change this, only science. Scientific judgment's monopoly on truth therefore forces the victims themselves to make use of all the methods and means of scientific analysis in order to succeed with their claims."
-German risk theorist Ulrich Beck

ERAR-AT is a mobile, solar- and GPS-powered, networked video installation that will accumulate and aggregate the environmental threats and risks faced by the population in its immediate location. ERAR-AT performs the difficulty of perceiving, evaluating, and understanding risk scenarios and presents an assessment of its given locale by producing a unique fourteen-tiered threat level embedded live within video projections onto local natural and architectural surfaces...

ECOARTTECH is Christine Nadir & Cary Peppermint
ERAR Programming & Research Assistant: Colin Twomey

[CONTINUED]

MORE »

Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Take Off

(0)

With a history stretching back to the days of analog computing, flight simulators play an important if under-sung role in the development of new media. Flight sims employed some of the earliest practical applications of high-end graphics, not to mention the first-person perspective; they symptomatically display the influence of military and aerospace industries on electronic culture as a whole; and Microsoft’s Flight Simulator PC game is one the most popular and longest-running franchises in the commercial sphere. Such potent provenance undergirds the bad-dream un-logic of Joan Leandre’s shuddering HD video In the Name of Kernel! Song of the Iron Bird (The Flight Recording Series), screening as part of the Barcelona-based artist’s first gallery exhibit at Project Gentili in Prato, Italy, which begins with shots set in the lurching cockpit of a free-falling virtual aircraft. In the Name of Kernel! grows out of Leandre’s past project retroyou nostal(G) (2002-2003), which likewise explored ideas of spatial disorientation and the mechanics of navigation through altered flight sims and user-unfriendly webpage design, and introduced his fictional narrative of one Lieutenant John Kernel, a pilot who relates tales of witnessing light-globe UFOs during missions. The gallery show includes other elements from the series: 7 Columns Mega NFO Film (2008) and NFO Box (2008), two prints of ASCII text designs on plexiglass that resemble both black boxes and ancient monuments, and bear serial numbers that will activate an "expensive unknown software application." - Ed Halter

Image: Joan Leandre, In the Name of Kernel!: Song of the Iron Bird (The Flight Recording Series) (video still), (2006 - 2008)

MORE »


About Us

(0)


wake

MORE »


Entry from the new web-surfing blog Spirit Surfers created in conjunction with Kevin Bewersdorf and Paul Slocum's exhibition of the same title at vertexList.

Originally posted on spirit surfers by INFOpruner


Women's Work

(0)


At times, identifying a group of artists' work under one broad umbrella can be homogenizing or even censorious as it pushes their practice into the preformed box of genre conventions and limited identifications. This has certainly been the case with so-called "feminist art," not lastly because the very notion of feminism has shifted over time, along with the concerns of contemporary women. Nonetheless, the moniker has been an important vehicle for a variety of voices, and like all social movements, feminism depends on the participation of a multitude to thrive. These are the tensions (and opportunities) that inform the organizational logic of "The Way That We Rhyme: Women, Art & Politics," an exhibition that will open at San Francisco's Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on March 29 and run until June 29. The show indeed includes a multitude of artists whose work ranges from live performance to DIY publications to street art to new media installations, thus testifying to the diversity of channels now used to address the issues faced by an equally diverse population that identify as women. These artists include Nao Bustamante, Vaginal Davis, Eve Fowler, MK Guth, Taraneh Hemami, Miranda July and Shauna McGarry, LTTR, Aleksandra Mir, Shinique Smith, subRosa, SWOON and Tennessee Jane Watson, The Counterfeit Crochet Project organized by Stephanie Syjuco, The Toxic Titties, and others. The explicit mandate of the exhibit is to present "the politically charged work of a new generation of women who use creativity as a form of empowerment and a means for making social change," and the ultimate argument is that "the way that we rhyme" is not only by raising hot topics, but by forming collaborations and coalition to swarm the root of these issues. This recalls the original definition of "radical," getting at the underlying fibers of ...

MORE »


Pong In Action

(1)


When the Atari video game Pong was released in 1972, it was instrumental in establishing what many today call computer culture, by virtue of its popularity and accessibility. The first product to find success as both an arcade game and a home console staple, it became a seemingly-ubiquitous touchstone for the members of a DIY generation empowered by play and home-hacking. In the 35 years since its release, the first generation video game has retained this mythos, even as technology has evolved around it. Lisbon-based artist André Gonçalves's new project, Pong--the analog arcade machine comments on the increased use of technology by artists seeking to address cultural or historical epochs, such as the one in which the original game participates. Gonçalves has created an installation that mimics the original arcade version of Pong, recreating it in analog form and giving it a live-action spin. Using a network of arduino processors, infra-red sensors, printer head guts, and a variety of other materials including some old-fashioned wood, the visual similarities are uncanny, even as they create an ironic "post-digital" tension between 1970s-era analog techniques and a markedly-digital icon to emerge from that era. However, the wit and finesse of Gonçalves's project lies in his use of hairdryer fans and a ping pong ball to carry out game action. What viewers actually see, when they look at his installation, is a real video-monitored, joystick-controlled table tennis game. Gonçalves is hardly the first artist to find inspiration in Pong, but he seems to be among the most successful at achieving the physical interaction and social fellowship originally intended by its creator, Nolan Bushnell. On that note, the game was meant to be played and Gonçalves's prototype will be presented March 28th at the Lisbon chapter of ...

MORE »