Posts for March 2008

Location One Announces Virtual Residency Program

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Location One announced its first ever Virtual Residency Program today. The residency is open to three participants willing to collaborate together on a project expressly related to the upcoming 2008 United States Presidential Election using non-F2F (face to face) interfaces such as webcams, email, chat, video, etc. The final project will be presented at the Location One space and on Location One's site in fall of 2008. Interested participants may apply by sending their CV, url and other relevant materials as well as a few lines describing why they want to pursue this opportunity to virtualresidency@location1.org by midnight May 1, 2008. For more information about the residency, visit Location One.

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Endless Race

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A new commissioned online work by André Sier for Lisboa 20 Arte Contemporânea's LX 2.0 Project, Space Race #1 takes the deceptively familiar look of a vintage computer game. Peppering black-and-white arrays of flat polygons are triangular spacecraft and blocky characters, racing to amass enough green fuel reserves to power their spaceships to the next planet - and the next level. As protagonists skitter back and forth, between fuel and ship, the camera jerkily tracks from one vignette to the next, at times running right through polygonal landscapes and forms and reminding one of the tenuous mesh of this geometric world. Yet the semblance of interactivity is just that: visitors are relegated to a marginal position, from which to observe a narrative of exploration whose end always circles back upon its beginning, as level succeeds level, seemingly without end. By stripping the gaming genre of its teleological content, Sier's project shifts focus to the structural elements of its imaginary universes. And while the rudimentary 3D aesthetic of the product might lead us to dismiss it as harmless fun, there's an argument to be made for the way its tale of compulsive fuel accumulation and frontierism echoes some of our own present-day master narratives. - Tyler Coburn

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Go With the Flow

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Fluxus is an art-historical movement that shares much in common with new media and is among our field's forebears. Its trajectory reads much like new media's: A network of experimental artists, scattered across the world, dissatisfied with the market's stagnant influence on art, concerned with art's ability to address the present moment, and intrigued by the interplay between concept and medium banded together to collaborate, creatively challenge each other, and co-theorize their niche. The word "fluxus" refers to "flow" and the idea of a fluidity between various media, as we now see in the ever-expanding field of new media art. Fluxus emerged in the 1960s and thrived through the late-1970s. Today, scholars and critics split hairs as to whether the movement is still in play, while its legacy continues to blossom--as in the current exhibition at New York's Maya Stendhal Gallery. "From Fluxus to Media Art," open through April 26, traces the DIY aesthetic embraced by members of the international Fluxus movement, and presents work whose signifying moments occur at the interstices of performance, film, literature, and electronic media. The show traces the movement's relationship to Dada and surrealism and its influence upon pop art, but has a stated interest in considering the path Fluxus paved for media art. Included is work by Jonas Mekas, George Maciunas, George Brecht, Andy Warhol, Nam June Paik, Shigeko Kubota, and Studio IMC. Many of the seminal projects and important pieces of ephemera on view make a trademark critique of authorship, while also paying homage to peers and collaborators within the movement. In the interest of knowing the history of the present, you're encouraged to see this exhibition. - Marisa Olson


Image: Nam June Paik, Majestic, 1975 reset 1996

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She doesn't think so but she's dressed for the h-bomb

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Ahmet Ögüt, Cut It Out, 2004

www.tank.tv
She doesn't think so but she's dressed for the h-bomb
15th March 2008 - 21st May 2008
Curated by Negar Azimi for tank.tv

She doesn't think so but she's dressed for the h-bomb.
-Gang of Four

The current moment is one marked by an abundance of mega-narratives, sweeping arm gestures, climactic dips, and ascents. How we talk about the present is almost always wrapped up in some version of the past. Visual culture inevitably brushes up against those histories, whether real or imagined (for that is not the point). A selection of short videos by Ziad Antar, Yael Bartana, Haris Epaminonda, Iman Issa, Hassan Khan, Rosalind Nashashibi, Shahryar Nashat, Ahmet Ögüt, and The Atlas Group reveal the weight of diverse histories in defining the current moment- whether manifest in the form of national myth, ritual, architecture, or pop culture. In the end, these are not static narratives; they are dynamic, promiscuous, enigmatic.

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


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"Add to friends: my myspace" by Nicolas Frespech.

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


True Mirror at the 2008 Whitney Biennial

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In conjunction with the 2008 Whitney Biennial, creative workshop and independent press Dexter Sinister will use the Commander's Room at the 7th Regiment Armory as an outpost to release a myriad of often playful and absurd texts through various channels of distribution. Meant as a spoof of the official communiqués of the Whitney Biennial, the project is ironically entitled "True Mirror." A revolving group of artists, designers, and musicians were invited to participate, such as Jason Fulford, Walead Beshty, Rob Giampietro and Alex Waterman. One of the releases, Sans Comic by Cory Arcangel, presents the Biennial's press release entirely in the widely mocked font Comic Sans. A simple gesture, the act illuminates how easy it is to disrupt institutional authority with a detail as basic as a typeface. "True Mirror" will terminate its dispatches this week on March 23rd.

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Mogens Jacobsen: Hørbar/Audiobar / ZKM | YOU_ser: The Century of the Consumer / Interview

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Hørbar/Audiobar is an interactive sound installation by media artist Mogens Jacobsen (born 1959 in Rome, lives and works in Copenhagen). It was developed at The Museum of Contemporary Art in Roskilde, Denmark. The user interacts with the sounds by placing bottles on a table. In this video, Mogens Jacobsen gives us a demonstration of how it works and talks about his work. ZKM | Media Museum: YOU_ser. The Century of the Consumer (October 21, 2007 - December 31, 2008).

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In an interview with VernissageTV, media artist Mogens Jacobsen discusses his project Hørbar/Audiobar currently on view at ZKM. Similar to a jukebox, visitors may activate a selection of sounds samples by placing the appropriate bottle on the table. In a move away from the mouse/screen interface which dominated his computer-based work in the 1990s, Jacobsen began experimenting with tactile interactive projects such as Hørbar/Audiobar.

Originally posted on VernissageTV art tv by Enrico


Express Yourself

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If virtual commerce were ever in need of a critical makeover, we might look no further than Kevin Bewersdorf and Paul Slocum to offer some solutions. As key instigators of a new type of objecthood, Bewersdorf and Slocum's individual and collective practices treat the internet as a launching pad for self-expression, where a motley crowd of Google searches and "spirit surfing" can be reinvested with the "ephemeral-imperfect" qualities of everyday items, courtesy of Walgreens.com Photo Center and other online manufacturers. What ensues are amusing products - pillowcases emblazoned with search result images of "Titanic" and "Woodstock"; mouse pads covered with pictures of "Pain" - made all the more bewildering by their stringent adherence to the terms of gallery exhibition: pristine white pedestals et. al. Bewersdorf and Slocum's reapportionment thus extends beyond the realm of clever shopping and into that of conceptual art, offering methods of traversing the routes of internet-based consumption towards highlighting a dominant commercial paradigm, yet ultimately sequestering its products in the realm of aesthetic display, within which their uncanny qualities may be brought into sharp relief. "Spirit Surfers," opening this weekend at VertexList, promises to find the artists delving deeper into this inquiry, and also marks the debut of their brand new web-based surfing club of the same name. - Tyler Coburn

Image: "Maximum Sorrow Throw Blanket #2", Kevin Bewersdorf, 2008

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Hoebot and Lovebot invade the german facebook

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Intro
Studivz is the german clone of the social network facebook. It is used by millions of german students. Since 2006 there were alot of discussions about privacy issues, data protection, and what could happen if you trust all your private data to a social community. This is the story of two bots who wanted to spread some love and fun in the student community, written in PHP and able to misuse the community's functions.

The Hoebot
The first bot, his name was Hoebot, was looking for great parties and hot girls. He automatically visited and SAVED the profiles of 10.000 students, and left awesome ascii graphics on the public profiles such as "the bitchslap" or "the beertruck". He was also able to "poke" people...


The Lovebot
Since the people really liked Hoebot, we went a little bit further and created "the Lovebot". Lovebot is able to use the personal data, collected by Hoebot, such as: political orientation, single or not single, favourite movies, education and much more.
Lovebot visited the student profiles and left personal hook-up messages to guys and girls, who are apparently single and maybe looking for a new partner. The message was saying: "Hi Martin, Sarah feels so alone. Why don't you visit her profile? This is her profile Number: xxxxxxxxx" Sarah got the same message, addressed the other way around...

In the end both bot accounts were deleted by the admins, and after publishing the documentation of the hack, we had to be really careful because the company investigated us, which lead to a pretty huge media feedback, enriching the discussions about giving away personal data on the internet without thinking about what could happen to it...

Here is the link to the detailed project documentation (in german). studivz_crawler.6x.to

AND ...

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Explanation of a hack for Studivz by Tobias Leingruber, Bert Schutzbach and Dragan Espenschied. Post originally from F.A.T.

Originally posted on F.A.T. by tobi


In Print

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Artists Olia Lialina and Dragan Espenschied have produced a body of work that focuses on the vernacular visual language of the web, one that revels in its gaps and imperfections. Works such as Olia's and Dragan's: Comparative History of Classic Animated GIFs and Glitter Graphics and Midnight explore the evolution of digital imagery in tandem with the changing conception of the web's ideal appearance. Currently exhibited in Montage: Unmonumental Online, Lialina's Some Universe (2002) engages one of the most classic and widely used digital images: stars.

The latest iteration of Lialina and Espenschied's project Online Newspapers (2004-Ongoing), developed for the Madison Square Park Conservancy, follows this distinct direction. Shown on four outdoor video screens on the grounds of the Shake Shack, Online Newspapers: New York Edition is a series of scanned front pages of four New York daily newspapers. All have been rendered illegible by flashy animations and glitter graphics that evoke the look and feel of the early web. The papers imagine how websites for New York's major newspapers would look if designed not by the slick designers whose work dominates the web now but by the early users of the web who had a more homegrown aesthetic. By elevating these early styles and graphics, Online Newspapers suggests that the forward movement of the web does not necessarily amount to cultural improvement and that this assumption of progress is, in itself, an over-hyped and inaccurate piece of news. The exhibition will last from March 20 through April 27, with the works shown daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. - Dennis Knopf

Olia Lialina and Dragan Espenschied, Online Newspapers: New York Edition, 2008

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