Posts for June 2008

Review of Glorious Ninth/Interview with Marius Watz at Furtherfield.

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Review of Glorious Ninth
Interview with Marius Watz.


www.furtherfield.org

Artists - Glorious Ninth
Review Title - love_potion and Invisibility_Phial
Reviewer - Marc Garrett



When I first began writing this review I thought that I'd just be writing a couple of quick paragraphs in response to Glorious Ninth's latest artwork Invisibility_Phial. However this work has not only uncovered for me aspects of the nature of their artistic collaboration, but also how bringing everyday life into art adds essential value to art and culture. Through their recent work, Glorious Ninth (Kate Southworth & Patrick Simons) have created an intriguing interface introducing a more personal and emotional context. Their own lives become part of the works, that serve to introduce us to their world via their intuitive, creative practice.
http://www.furtherfield.org/displayreview.php?review_id=305

A FORM OF TECHNOLOGICAL MIMESIS
Interview with Marius Watz by Franz Thalmair



Marius Watz, an artist concerned with generative systems for creating visual form, still, animated, or realtime, argues in the following interview: "One of the privileges of Generative Art is that the author can easily be surprised by her own creation." Watz discovered the computer at age eleven and immediately found his direction in life. At age 20 he defected from Computer Science studies to do graphics for raves, using his programming to create organic shapes in 2D and 3D. In 2005 Watz started Generator.x, a platform for Generative Art and Design which so far has resulted in a conference, a blog, a travelling exhibition and concert tour. Watz currently lives in Oslo and New York. His tools of choice are Java, Processing, VVVV and Flash. He continues to edit the Generator.x blog and prepare future Generator.x events, as well as teaching workshops in Computational Design and Generative Art.
Permlink - http://www ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Luxe Gallery: Cliff Evans, Empyrean

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Luxe Gallery
East Village / Lower East Side
53 Stanton Street,
June 14 - July 26, 2008
Opening: Saturday, June 14, 7 - 9PM
Web Site

"[T]he machine has passed into the heart of desire, that is, human activity constitutes nothing more than "residual work" or the machine's psychic "imprint" on the individual's imaginary world." - Felix Guattari

For this exhibition, Evans presents two digital image-montage animations. Narratives, loops, and crescendos play across the landscape of a strangely frozen now. With the assumed position of a complicit virtual navigator, Evans traverses scenes of familiar power struggles, guiding the viewer through conflated contemporary and historical events and environments. Evans constructs these closed and flattened environments from found online images.

Traces of their own absence, these images are, again, sliced in time from their context, their lives, and re-appropriated to reform a world - view. Unsure of where to integrate his position, Evans repeats the scenes; just as the animated image - objects continue their dance -- becoming machinic perceptions of a complicated sublimity.

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Originally posted on ArtCal Picks by Rhizome


Monkeying Around

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Humans are capable of such funny contradictions. Take, for instance, our proclivity to forget that we, too, are animals, while nonetheless looking to other primates in an effort to further study ourselves. In a video series entitled "Primate Cinema," Rachel Mayeri dives headfirst into this often comic dilemma. Three videos in this series are currently on view at Los Angeles' TELIC Arts Exchange, and each takes the increasingly popular primate narrative genre as its starting point to build "an observation platform for viewing the social, sexual, and political behavior of human and nonhuman primates." In Jane Goodall and the Wild Chimpanzees we see a live performance of a classic nature documentary, developed and taped as the result of a three-week workshop at TELIC. The piece explores the documentary medium and the work it does to dramatize scenarios, despite its presumed objectivity. How to Act like an Animal also unfolded from a workshop--in this case co-led by primatologist Deborah Forster and theater director Alyssa Ravenwood. The tasks rehearsed speak to common perceptions of the primitivity of non-human animals, with the close study and re-interpretation of a nature documentary leading to the act of "hunting, killing, and sharing the meat of a colobus monkey." An earlier video in the series, Baboons as Friends, reaches beyond the model of pure consumption and survival to explore the emotional and social lives of primates. Shot with human actors in a film noir style, the piece explores the ways in which "lust, jealousy, sex, and violence transpir[e] simultaneously in human and nonhuman worlds." While entertaining, the videos also taxonomize and observe the field of primate studies as a model of inquiry and a classic medium of scientific thought. If anything, Mayeri's work takes a compelling look at the evolution of a field crafted to ...

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Travess Smalley

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Originally posted on bevel and boss by Rhizome


Tourists and Travelers

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Tourists and Travelers:
New commissioned works by artists Taeyoon Choi and Joseph DeLappe
June 21 - July 19, 2008
Opening reception: 6PM, June 21

Also on June 21: Eyebeam's annual Open Studios, 3-6PM
Eyebeam, 540 W. 21st St. (btw 10th and 11th Aves.)

As many New Yorkers ready for the annual ritual of summer travel, Eyebeam presents Tourists and Travelers, an art exhibition resulting from Taeyoon Choi and Joseph DeLappe's 2007-08 residencies at Eyebeam. The show features an unlikely pair of projects that reflect the artists' interests in journeys across real and virtual spaces: a Second Life avatar modeled on Mahatma Gandhi and a tourist-chasing, robotic duck. Choi, from Seoul, Korea, and DeLappe, from Reno, Nevada, both traveled to New York City for their residencies as recipients of Eyebeam's inaugural Commission for Resident Artists. The Tourists and Travelers exhibition is free and open to the public, and will be on view June 21 - July 19, 2008.

[CONTINUED]

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Radio, Art, Life: New Contexts

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TATE (UK): Helen Thorington contributes a feature article on the evolving context for sound and radio practice, exploring networked media, participatory platforms and the sonification of every-day objects. An introduction to a series of Radio Art including recent work by Christof Migone and Sarah Washington.

"What is Radio Art? Radio art had a special meaning to those who created it in the US during the Eighties and Nineties. From the most complex hi-tech studio productions to the raw energy of live and interactive broadcasts, these artists were predominantly engaged with subverting media conventions by presenting something other than familiar radio forms.

Thus while the work might use journalistic devices or dramatic conventions, it was neither journalism, nor drama; it wasn't music either though it might be composed entirely of non-textual sound. American radio art was a vast array of different forms that recognised radio's distinct means and parameters, and at the same time, its creative possibilities, how it might challenge existing social and cultural norms and create/fashion new ones" Continue Reading Radio, Art, Life: New Contexts by Helen Thorington, Tate Intermedia Art, May 2008.

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Originally posted on Networked Music Review by jo


One-to-Many

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Composer, musician, and creative hacker Tristan Perich is a New York City phenom. Unsurprisingly descended from Warhol-era conceptual artist Anton Perich, the younger Perich has become a fixture in the local avant garde scene, bringing his own brand of circuit-bent instruments to the contemporary music sphere. His band, The Loud Objects, have made a very well-received international magic-show of their singular work, which involves soldering musical chips together atop an overhead projector--clad in futuristic sunglasses, no less! He released an album of music composed entirely of 1-bit tunes, "the lowest possible digital representation of audio," in which the cd itself contains a circuit completed by the insertion of headphones into a jack on the side of the jewel case, at which point forty minutes of lo-fi music is played for the listener. Part sculpture, part sound-art, the project is a novel (and nice-sounding) interjection into a recording era dominated by ephemeral, low-quality MP3s. This Wednesday, Perich will premiere a new composition at Brooklyn's Issue Project Room, called Untitled (Bernadette Mayer). The work revolves around a poem written in 1969 by the eponymous poet and is arranged for five voices and fifteen channels of 1-bit music, providing evidence that working in a supposedly low-level system can still yield high levels of creativity and aural complexity. Perich's piece will be played together with his older three-violin work, Rotary. Both compositions will be performed by a diverse and extraordinarily talented group of Perich's contemporaries, including Abby Fischer, Lesley Flanigan, Sarah Moulton, Daisy Press, Pamela Stein, Monica Davis, Yuri Namkung, and Jessica Pavone. Incidentally, it is also worth noting that Perich has pulled-in some serious girl power here, which bodes well for what can tend to be a male-dominated community. If you're in the area, you won't want to ...

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all dogs go to heaven

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Originally posted on out_4_pizza by Rhizome


Half of the People Are Stoned and the Other Half Are Waiting for the Next Election*

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Tuesday, July 1, 2008 at 8pm
Light Industry presents

Half of the People Are Stoned and the Other Half Are Waiting for the Next Election

Curated by Nick Hallett

A line written by Paul Simon for Leonard Bernstein's Mass (1971).

A screening of activism-oriented video, performance documentation, and new media from 2004.

As the race to the White House consumes our nation's collective attention, let's take a look back to the 2004 election and celebrate the unique spirit of that year when the art world in New York and across the country took up the mantle of this country's great activist tradition.

Many artists who make political work do so regardless of their calendars, but the high stakes of '04 yielded contexts for agit-prop art and performance unseen since the late 1960s. Initiatives like Downtown for Democracy and the Imagine Festival united New York's artist communities against the Bush administration as the RNC rolled into town. The Internet matured as a critical venue for countercultural action in attempts to revise standard models of protest. Audiences and critics, eager to experience their own distaste for the current state of affairs distilled into forms of art and entertainment, gave greater voice to explicitly political work. Guerrilla theater filled the streets at every opportunity for nose-thumbing, resulting in countless arrests, while cellphone cameras rolled to create a new kind of folk-documentary. Culture and politics collided in vivid and memorable fashion.

This collection of work from four years ago offers itself as something of a time capsule, although not enough time has passed for true nostalgia to set in. Yet the 2008 election is playing itself out very differently than its predecessor. Without a concrete enemy to inspire rage, Americans--artists included--seem to be placing their faith in the system ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Through A Different Lens

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A two-part exhibition at Hirshorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, in Washington D.C., "The Cinema Effect: Illusion, Reality and the Moving Image" considers how contemporary cinema -- here loosely defined to encompass "such related moving-image media as television, home video and digital entertainment" -- has further obscured the boundary of fiction and reality. In the first part, "Dreams," Candice Breitz, Julian Rosefeldt, Pierre Huyghe and others approached the history of cinema through sampling and reenactment. "Realisms," opening this Thursday, will shift the focus to works exploring "the confrontation between control and freedom in a cinematic age." In its examination of this topic, the exhibition will identify the mass-media's capacity to sculpt a partial yet dominant account of contemporary and historical events and, in turn, the ability of artists using the moving-image to offer alternative narrations and interpretations of such events. Notable among these is Jeremy Deller's The Battle of Orgreave (2001), a filmed reenactment of a culminating moment in Britain's 1984 National Union of Mineworkers Strike. Between clips of veteran miners and professional historical performers reconstructing the violence between strikers and cavalry police, Deller inserts photographs of the original event and interviews with NUM member David Douglass, politician Tony Benn and others, who reflect upon the nature of the strike, the media's distortion of its events, and the long-term ramifications for British society. Omer Fast's Godville (2005) is another standout: a 50-minute, two-channel video of interviews with historical reenactors at Colonial Williamsburg. While Fast elides himself as interviewer from the work, his hand is conspicuously present in the montage, as disparate audio snippets from interviewees (either spoken about their profession or in the voice of their historical personae) are woven into seamless monologues. This makes an apt treatment of the living-history museum, and suggests this fascination with ...

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