Posts for June 2008

fake is the new real

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some nice projects up at fake is the new real. for instance, these 'very low quality jpegs'. see more here.

[all fake is the new real. from the series very low quality jpgs.]

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Originally posted on i heart photograph by Rhizome


Review of Olafur Eliasson's "Take Your Time" at the Museum of Modern Art and P.S.1

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by Rafael Tiffany

Olafur Eliasson's expansive mid-career survey "Take Your Time" claims a significant amount of space at both the Museum of Modern Art and P.S.1, giving reason for museum goers to follow its title's injunction. The Klaus Biesenbach and Roxana Marcoci-curated show comes to New York on the heels of a smaller manifestation at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, continuing a dramatic stateside splash for the Danish-Icelandic artist-- which will be literalized later this summer with four waterfalls he's planned for the downtown harbor area. Those who want to experience the diversity of the crowd-pleasing artist's output should make time for all the components of this wide-ranging show.



Olafur Eliasson, Beauty, 1993. Photograph by Matthew Septimus. Courtesy of MoMA and P.S.1.

The works present trace Eliasson's rise to prominence since the 1990s. His earlier pieces-- he prefers "apparatuses" or "experimental setups" -- typically stage modest interventions within our perceptual assumptions, and are frequently disarming in their economy. Beauty (1993) is especially mesmerizing, consisting of an iridescent curtain of mist in P.S.1's dark basement vault, produced simply by refracting light off of water droplets sprayed from a suspended rubber tube. The capacity for this approach to work at a vastly magnified level was apparent with The weather project, his spectacular and now iconic 2003 installation of light, smoke, and mirrors for the Tate Modern. One could compare Wannabe (1991) with Ventilator (1997) in order to gain a sense of this ambition of scale: the former is a single low-hanging spotlight tucked into a side chamber at P.S.1, designating an intimate platform for training viewers to command institutional space; the latter, a free-hanging industrial fan that pendulously sways through MoMA's immense atrium, erratically animates the imposing ...

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LOSHADKA at OTO on Friday June 13

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OTO is pleased to present on Friday June 13th from 7 to 10pm, an new installation by LOSHADKA (http://www.loshadka.org/)

ILIA OVECHKIN
PETRA CORTRIGHT
DAN WICKERHAM
WILL SIMPSON
TRAVESS SMALLEY
JAY PEYTON
BILLY RENNEKAMP
THOMAS GALLOWAY
HAYLEY SILVERMAN

SPEED LIL-LIZ_GUY69: HELLO pup
PIXL_lixxard: SUOP SUP SUP SUPSUPS
lil-liz_guy69 of sup: h foutue attacks you with armed hand where you with for this praise with neon I heard it descends U To the bottom
PIXL_lixxard: spout out some wwtf go to the hell go to your tomb which I do not go anywhere with a witch
lil-liz_guy69: U are dry everywhere of the United States in your shorts of spoils eating a meat pie
PIXL_lixxard69: I hold a cat which I make of drugs and im energy with the swimming pool of stuffing of space
lil-liz_guy69: a good number of drugs and drinks and music and hot hot hot babies in an oil factory functioning for dollar$
PIXL_lixxard: each one there will be sexy AM completely foutu I right or amirite
lil-liz_guy69: honey bee which you know that I am ready with the ready git and obtain pumped
PIXL_lixxard: hehehebreaking all the rules on this ground

+++

More here... (directions and etc)

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Casting Shadows

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In Mexican-Canadian artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer's practice, technologies all but synonymous with top-down monitoring and control (surveillance cameras, tracking systems, pattern-recognition software) transform into the base-units of interactive installations. "RECORDERS," the artist's current solo exhibition at The Edith Russ Site for Media Art, in Germany, emphasizes the individual and collective aspects of spectatorship, building an art-going public, in part, through archives of the visual and physical traces of past viewers. Close-up, for example, comprises a monitor divided into 800 small videos, which together respond to the physical presence of a spectator by mimicking the form of his or her shadow. These small videos are but fragments of a constantly updating reserve of 10,000 recordings, all of spectators who have previously viewed the work. For Pulse Room, Lozano-Hemmer has wired an array of 100 suspended lightbulbs to a metal handle. When a visitor grasps the handle, his or her pulse causes the first bulb in the array to flicker in unison; the introduction of another visitor's pulse causes the first flicker to move to the next bulb, and so on. Eventually, all of the lightbulbs hold a record of a given visitor - a fact all the more poetic considering that Lozano-Hemmer's inspiration came from listening to the heartbeats of his twins during his wife's pregnancy. Pulse Room is but one of many variations of this project: Pulse Front graced Toronto's Harbourfront last June, and Madison Square Park, in New York City, will host Pulse Park this coming fall. As with the best of Lozano-Hemmer's work, this evocative and technologically sophisticated installation finds its unique footing at the intersection of art, location and community. - Tyler Coburn


Image: Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Close-up, 2006

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CALL: SOUNDARTMUSEUM DIGITAL ARCHIVE

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Soundartmuseum: New Open Call
SOUNDARTMUSEUM DIGITAL ARCHIVE
01 May 2008 - 31 Dec 2008
SoundArtMuseum, Via Conte Verde, 15 00185 Rome (Italy)

http://www.soundartmuseum.net/

SAM archive on the Internet - Since three years from its start, SoundArtMuseum goes on the Internet.

More than one thousand artworks collected through an open call starting from 2004, will be accessible along with all the information within the database.

Hosted on the new Zerynthia and RAM radioartemobile portal, the special section for SoundArtMuseum lists all information and multimedia on artists and artworks in the archive-- in alphabetical order and with a search module.

Beyond specific information on the artworks and (when necessary) on the compilation where they are included, the website also displays technical information, consistent biographical information and links to other resources and external websites.

The digital platform to access the SoundArtMuseum material allows a direct approach to an important resource which will be a tool for researchers interested in contemporary arts and multimedia. The consistent body of artworks in the archive comprise more than two hundred artists and one thousand artworks, ranging from the Eighties to the early 2000s, and includes artists from different generations and various approaches to sound and its possible uses within artistic practices.

[CONTINUED]

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Originally posted on ../mediateletipos))) by pablo sanz


Free at Last... Sort Of.

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Critical Art Ensemble co-founder Dr. Steven Kurtz has been cleared of all charges in what is widely acknowledged as a bogus mail fraud case, and the federal government has said that they do not plan to appeal the judge's decree that the case was without merit. The CAE is a tactical media group whose highly-acclaimed, internationally-exhibited art and activist academic writings have been explicitly critical of threats to civil liberty, such as those posed in the case against Kurtz and his colleague, Professor Robert Ferrell. Dr. Ferrell and Dr. Kurtz were accused for an activity common in the field of scientific research: mailing each other materials in the spirit of collaboration and information-sharing. The U.S. government originally charged Kurtz with bioterrorism, after local officials discovered biological artwork in his home while responding to an emergency call regarding the tragic death of his wife. When this tack failed, they tried to save face by prosecuting both Kurtz and Ferrell for mail fraud. The allegation was that this use of the mail violated the terms of sale of the innocuous bacteria exchanged between the two parties. Under the Patriot Act, being found guilty of this crime could carry a sentence of up to twenty years in prison, rather than the five that used to threaten gangsters, petty criminals, and the long list of activists the government has previously tried to silence. At a MoMA screening of Lynn Hershman's film Strange Culture, which centered on Kurtz's case, the artist said that he was fairly certain that this was the first instance in which an individual was charged with fraud without another party actually claiming to have been defrauded. Others have previously likened the case to an act of making a federal case out of [allegedly] breaking the warranty on ...

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Net Aesthetics 2.0, The Long of It

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Artistic Rationale for working on the web

2006

  • Artists who began working on the web because they had no chance of exhibiting due to their field of interest (Cory Arcangel)
  • Artists using the web as a tool (Wolfgang Staehle)
  • Artists who's offline work is influenced by the internet but also make online (MBS and Marisa Olson)

    2008

  • Everyone is interdisciplinary. (Damon Zucconi, Petra Cortright and Tom Moody)
  • Artists using the web as a tool (MTAA -- they've transitioned to this)
  • Artists who's offline work is influenced by the internet but also make online (Jennifer and Kevin McCoy)

    Internet Outsider Art (found or appropriated material)

    2006

  • Described as interest in nostalgia. A strategy employed by artists as a means of dealing the rate of technological change (ie a movie looks pretty much the same 15 years later, the internet does not.) Working with older material gives the artist a means of understanding it.

    2008

  • Originality and production. Oliver Laric is quoted by Petra Cortright, who represents the younger generation, "I've kind of come to the point right now where I don't see any necessity in producing images myself -- everything that I would need exists, it's just about finding it" Everyone is talking about surf clubs.

    [CONTINUED]

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Paddy from Art Fag City published a review of last Friday's Net Aesthetics 2.0 panel, followed by a long and detailed comparison between the major points of discussion from both 2006 and 2008. I have reblogged only a small portion of the latter, it is definitely worth reading through in its entirety, more here.

Originally posted on Art Fag City by Rhizome


Cold Reading

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Shotgun weddings between cinematic storytelling and hypertext narrative are certainly not new; the format stretches back to the dial-up era with David Blair's pioneering Waxweb and has been successfully employed by Walid Ra'ad for an online version of the Atlas Group project. Perhaps the awkward, potentially confusing structure of connecting text, images and video clips through hierarchies of linkage, combined with the internet's propensity for fostering dubious information, lends itself to the faux-archival conceit--a metaphor employed not only by Blair and Ra'ad, but also Rosa Barba for her Dia Art Foundation online commission, Vertiginous Mapping (2008). In her first web-based work, Barba tells the story of Alkuna, a fictionalized arctic community in the Nordic nation of Forgotten, whose history she bases on that of a real but unnamed Swedish city. Years of diamond mining by the corporation known as Urban Future Organization-Science Division (or UFO-SD) have led to geological instability beneath Alkuna, and now the entire city faces mass relocation. The viewer wanders through this story via a collection of various media: dry texts vaguely written in the styles of governmental memos or corporate press releases, videos of raw 16mm rolls of Swedish industrial sites set to looping electronic scores, photos of landscapes and maps from the city's municipal archives, and an intriguing collection of repurposed archival films detailing Sweden's transition from left-side to right-side driving in preparation for joining the Common Market. Whether the tentative, semi-articulated nature of this work should be taken as a structural shortcoming or conscious esthetic choice remains unclear. But Vertiginous Mapping succeeds in creating a peculiarly European atmosphere of social power, one in which a private company poses itself in a pseudo-governmental role, and a government undergoes social initiatives with the proactive determination more often seen in corporations ...

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Spell Check

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Go back only a few hundred years into history, and the lines between science, art and the occult disappear into the discipline known as "natural magic"-- think of richly illustrated chemico-medical treatises by alchemists, or the theatrical experiments in optics that Athanasius Kircher dubbed his "great art of light and shadow." Consider then the practice of magic as a sort of technology, albeit one contrarily based on a worldview that the 20th century sought to uproot and discard. This instrumentalist use of occult knowledge seems to pervade "The Great Transformation-- Art and Tactical Magic," a current show at the Frankfurter Kunstverein that explores "the possibility for social transformation using the tools and languages of transcendental forces." At the spiritual center of the exhibit lies the work of Berkeley's The Center for Tactical Magic, a collective whose work traffics an esoterica-inflected street activism-- their own peculiar brand of psi power to the people. Other works touch on the more quotidian practice of ledgerdemain: Aurélien Froment's 2007 film Théâtre de poche depicts the slight-of-hand by a stage magician, while Allen Ruppersberg's 1971 single-channel tape A Lecture on Houdini (For Terry Allen) shows the artist bound in a straight jacket, reading a list of events in the life of the world-famous escape artist. Further spooky subjects appear in works by Mike Kelley, Banks Violette, Claire Fontaine and others. - Ed Halter

Image: Aurélien Froment, Théâtre de poche, 2007

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Time to TRIP Out

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Despite their long lineages, the fields of locative media and psychogeography have only recently entered the art world. Every year there are increasingly more festivals and exhibitions devoted to the work of a growing number of artists who identify with these terms, but there has yet to be a substantial enough response on the part of art critics, academic journals, and others whose engagement is needed to help flesh-out the art historical trajectory and even genre conventions associated with locative media. Now a Manchester-based program called "Territories Reimagined International Practices" (conveniently abbreviated "TRIP") seeks to bring together artists, academics, and arts professionals under the umbrella of a three-day event (June 19-21) designed to present the best work in the field and generate more discourse around it. The gathering will feature a full-fledged conference, along with citywide performances, exhibitions, and interventions. Interestingly, the organizers have made precise efforts to wrestle differences between the few existing narratives currently swirling around this work, such as the seemingly contradictory aimlessness of the "psychogeographic drift" and the tightly-honed artist intervention. Like many subsets of new media art, those with a stake in this field have the double-edged challenge of speaking to the pronounced, shared qualities of its practitioners and also their diversity, which is indicative of a thriving field. Visit their blog for more details on the evolving program and use it to start your own psychogeographic bibliography. - Marisa Olson


Jane Samuels, "3.15pm, School House. Torches off. Cold, bright, quiet." (From the Abandoned Buildings Project), 2007

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