Posts for June 2008

formal shock / duck face

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Originally posted on Loshadka by thomas


JAMES HOUSTON

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Found at the always dependable Kitsune Noir, James Houston's remix of Radiohead's "Nude" using a scanner, a dot-matrix printer, an array of hard-drives and a Spectrum ZX, is completely jaw-dropping. More interesting work to be found at 1030, and binary load filter.

www.vimeo.com/1109226

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Originally posted on It's Nice That - Blog by Rhizome


Andrew Kreps Gallery: Standard Sizes

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Andrew Kreps Gallery

525 West 22nd Street,

Chelsea

June 14 - July 12, 2008
Opening: Saturday, June 14, 6 - 8PM

Matt Sheridan Smith, Untitled, 2006, Newspapers, 24 x 14 x 0.75 inches

A group exhibition curated by João Ribas

The Andrew Kreps Gallery is pleased to present Standard Sizes, a group exhibition curated by João Ribas.

Standard Sizes surveys a diverse group of artists over several generations whose work resists the notion of art as the product of an expressive subject--the radically individuated self largely equated with the figure of the artist. In place of this vestige of Renaissance self-fashioning and the affectations of Romanticism, the exhibition presents works that look to standards and formal procedures to displace the idea of expressive subjectivity as the domain of art.

If the figure of the visionary artist was once emblematic of the emancipatory idea of the 'individual' in a society where it had not yet fully emerged, this notion is deradicalized by the democratization of subjective expression today. As a result of this abiding 'selfness,' it seems more pressing to understand the structures and standards built into the parameters of 'expression' and the production of meaning itself.

By foregrounding an effect, rather than the affect, of meaning, Standard Sizes looks to practices that solicit content from standards or procedural form, cede subjective control through generative systems, or that elicit meaning from iteration, standardization, or repetition. Ranging from work based on standard formats and materials, to the rhetorical use of tropes such as the expressive brushstroke, the works in the exhibition looks to the implicit, if now obscured, values and norms present in standardized form. This is to evince how frames dictate content, how the values assimilated in standards belie whose feet and fingers are measured to arrive at ...

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Originally posted on ArtCal by Rhizome


Prison Inspection

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Architectural design is currently enjoying a watershed moment of increased media attention, but among all the discussion of new museums, opera houses, and theatres, there is little attention paid to one of the world's oldest and most significant cultural institutions: the prison. According to a recent Washington Post article, more than 1 in 100 American adults were incarcerated at the start of 2008, making jails among the most popularly-visited sites in the nation. Historically, these buildings have been important tools in the disciplining of societies (including those who lived and worked in them, or those seeking to avoid them), and they've often provided major critical metaphors for the transmission of ideology and power structures-- most famously in the case of Foucault's interest in Bentham's panopticon. But for all the discussion generated about the design of this structure, it was ultimately dismissed as a bad idea, and few new ideas have been proposed. An exhibition at Turin's Sandretto Re Rebaudengo Foundation, entitled "YOUprison: Some thoughts on the limitation of space and freedom," invites 11 international architectural studios to suggest prison designs that not only consider the practical challenges of such spaces (small matching units, confinement, surveillance sight lines, lockdown procedures), but also the contemporary implications of imprisonment. Curated by Francesco Bonami, the show includes a true who's-who of architects, including Alexander Brodsky, Diller+Scofidio, INABA, Eyal+Ines Weizman, and others. Translating these designs and their site-specific psychological effects into the context of a museum space present a unique challenge for all involved, but the results will offer proof of the jail cell's status as unspoken spectacle and insight into the architect's ethical and personal relationship to the places they create. Many have even chosen to use the cells as platforms for the dissemination ...

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inter_multi_trans_actions

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inter_multi_trans_actions

If you are near the north of England, you might want to check out this interesting symposium on 26th June in Edinburgh called inter_multi_trans_actions.

"This one day symposium will bring together a number of leading practitioners from the fields of art, architecture and design who each share a common desire to exploit the latest computing technologies in their creative practice. The invited speakers will reveal their cutting edge work that blurs the traditional boundaries of the creative disciplines.

The aim of this event is to inspire and inform the symposium delegates of the significance of this trans-disciplinary research and its impact for creative practice in the UK. This event will appeal to a wide audience including practitioners, researchers, educators, industrialists and stakeholders involved in the creative industries."

The programme includes Crispin Jones, Moritz Waldemeyer, Troika, Greyworld, Jason Bruges Studio, HeHe, Lucy Bullivant, The Owl Project and thePOOCH.

Organised by Napier University. Tickets cost £20.

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Originally posted on Pixelsumo by Chris OShea


Radio Activity

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You may have read about free103point9 here, before. At Rhizome, we maintain a high esteem for this pioneering organization serving the field of "transmission arts," and we've fortunately been able to collaborate with them on projects in the past. In many ways, our missions overlap, as our organizations grew out of a desire to support emergent and often immaterial practices. Free103point9's founders situate their vision of the field in an evolutionary framework, looking at how broadcasting and transmission grew out of shared trajectories with net art, video art, mail art, and other creative forms of distributed communication. The organization frequently teams up with other institutions to take this message on the road and increase exposure for the work of transmission artists. Their newest collaborative project is both a show and a recording, co-presented by the Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona, in their Radio Web program (RWM). This curatorial initiative "is a radio-phonic project from the MACBA's website that explores the possibilities of the internet and radio as spaces of synthesis and exhibition." This self-reflexive approach to presentation is also inherent in the free103point9 show, entitled "Radio Action III," which takes up "radio" as both its theme and its delivery vehicle. Fifteen artists collaborate to present five-minute tracks inspired by this important device, and a bit of surfing of the artists' profiles on free103point9 will assure you of their diversity, ranging from site-specific sound manipulation to interventionist broadcasts. The recordings are the newest CD to be released in free103point9's Dispatch series and the album will premiere at an event at the New Museum of Contemporary Art on August 7th. Meanwhile, it will be streaming online at RWM from June 18 - August 30. Be sure to tune-in. - Marisa Olson


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Live Stage: Sound Installations at Diapason [Brooklyn, NY]

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diapason.jpg

Diapason galleryd intermedia presents Micah Silver: You and Me, Going, and Patrick K.-H. ScAS (ScotchAcoustic Session):: Two sound installations :: Programmed as part of Diapason's exchange program with Moscow's Theremin Center :: JUNE 14, 21 and 28 // SATURDAYS 2-8 PM :: FREE :: OPENING RECEPTION: JUNE 14 6PM :: 882 Third Avenue (between 32nd and 33rd Street) // Brooklyn, NY :: Subways: D, N, R to 36th Street :: 718.499.5070 // info@diapasongallery.org :: Sponsored by The Trust for Mutual Understanding

Program Notes:
You and Me, Going is the result of an imaginary unfolding -- of a near-archaeological process through my recent work: of unearthing artifacts, brushing them off, finding new resonances with old things, and deducing/constructing narrative from emerging layers of association. My recent installations have required the capture and creation of vast libraries of audio material, much of which never found the right home. You and Me, Going is a landscape of these bits and a departure for me from working with algorithms to realize pieces that endlessly permute within stochastic bounds. For this project I wanted to refocus on the microscopic details of mixing and to discover how the more constructed basis for my recent works has been metabolised into intuitions and tastes. And so I returned to an entirely handmade approach. In one section of the piece, part of Agonism, a poem by Bethany Wright, is sung. The complete work is in the back of this program. (Micah Silver)

ScAS (ScotchAcoustic Session) was started in 2004 as series of live-acousmatic pieces based on scotch-tape sounds, recorded and edited by various types. It is a generative composition, so-called work-in-progress. The idea in the beginning was to limit sound source and to find structures for the following composition, starting from this material. In this way, it has such forms as: duo of ...

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Originally posted on Networked Music Review by helen


Behind the Black Curtain

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For "Paint it Black," his first solo museum show at Artpace, San Antonio, American artist Oliver Lutz presents a two-room installation exploring "contemporary mass spectacle as a breeding ground for culturally conditioned rituals, myths, and social interaction." In the main gallery, Lutz has covered six paintings with infrared-sensitive black, a pigment mainly used in military applications. Monitors in the second gallery connect to ultraviolet surveillance cameras in the first, framing each of the paintings to disclose renderings, hidden beneath the pigment, of photographs Lutz took at a Texas Motor Speedway NASCAR event. If sporting events are usually collective affairs, Lutz's paintings examine the divisive and introverted qualities particular to car races: spectators are shown wearing headphones, for example, either to dampen excessive noise or listen in on radio broadcasts of the race and conversations between pit crews and drivers; some even watch live video feeds via handheld devices. Lutz's installation emulates this fragmentary type of spectacle, drawing spectators into various levels of participation and even positioning the surveillance cameras so as, when viewed from the perspective of the monitors, to seemingly enmesh them in the crowds hidden under the paint. These strategies recall those of Lutz's Lynching 1 (2007) and Lynching 2 (2007) installations, which presented partially blackened paintings that, when run through ultraviolet surveillance technology, revealed imagery of crowds and lynching victims derived from archival photography. However, while each installation employs the conditions of art spectatorship in examining the topography of the American public, "Paint it Black" ultimately follows too closely behind the exhibition design of the Lynching series, at the risk of reducing two very different historical moments to falsely comparable terms. - Tyler Coburn

Image: Oliver Lutz, Paint It Black, 2008

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This is Not a Game

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Among the random fringe benefits of the Beijing Olympics bonanza are not only a big international platform for the protest of China-related issues like human rights, Tibetan independence, or the responsibility of big trading nations to intervene in the Darfur scenario, but also a big international platform for the presentation of contemporary art. The games have brought an influx of attention and funding for "cultural projects," and thankfully for new media artists and their followers, Beijing's prestigious National Art Museum of China has used the windfall to present "Synthetic Times," one of the most impressive and widely-anticipated exhibitions of the last decade. Spread out over 48,000 interior square feet and another 22,000 square feet of outdoor space is an exhibition huge in stature and big in scope, presenting a survey of contemporary electronic art. The selected works imagine how the plastic arts have evolved into new forms of synthesis, with the advent of programming, physical computing, interactive media, and all kinds of fancy new lights, lasers, and whirlygigs now being put to varying conceptual and beautiful uses by those in the field. Singling-out just a few works here would almost be a disservice to the others, but if you care to peruse an ambitious sampling of great works and read critical essays on their work, by rock stars in the field of media theory, you're highly advised to surf the show's content-rich site. To the credit of the show's organizers (and also their collaborators MoMA, Eyebeam, and Parsons, who put on thoughtful events in New York as a precursor to the show's opening), this is not the kind of big-budget, low-impact show that these surveys often turn out to be. In fact, if anything it picks up and runs with the ball of ...

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ETC Media Artists Residency

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The Experimental Television Center announces the next deadline for the Artists in Residency Program, July 15, 2008, for residencies between September 2008 through January 2009.

The Residency supports contemporary electronic media art projects. The studio workshop environment offers access to an image processing system, intensive individualized instruction and time for exploration and personal creative growth. Artists have an opportunity to study the processes and techniques of analog and digital imaging and to then use the system independently in the creation of new works. Participating artists have complete aesthetic and technical control over all aspects of the making process.

The image processing system is a hybrid tool set which facilitates interactive relationships between older historically important analog instruments such as colorizers and keyers, and new digital technologies using a G5, several G4s, a customized Doepfer A-100 system with sonic and control modules, software including Max/MSP, Jitter and Pluggo, as well as DVD authoring and editing software, DVD Studio Pro and Flash. Recording is mini-DV/DV and DVD. Svhs and 3/4" decks are also available. This rich electronic environment encourages artists to explore boundaries and intersections within narrative, documentary and social issue traditions as well as more experimental forms.

A complete list is available by email and on the web in the News section.

The postmark deadline is July 15th. You are encouraged to email the written materials.

To apply please send the following:
1. A brief project description
2. A current bio or resume
3. A prioritized set of dates between September 3, 2008 and January 31, 2009.
4. A sample of completed work with SASE if you wish it returned.

For more information please contact us.

etc(at)experimentaltvcenter.org

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome