Posts for June 2008

Net Aesthetics 2.0

(1)

The upcoming program in Rhizome's New Silent Series at the New Museum, Net Aesthetics 2.0, will examine the state of contemporary art engaged with internet art. Convening leading artists, critics and curators, this panel will explore salient topics such as the relationship of artists emerging now to the first generation of internet art, the correspondence between online art and offline exhibition (as well as the phenomenon of "internet aware" art), the current role of the artist on the internet, the position of explicit political content in internet art (and the question of whether internet art practice is undergoing a more "formalist" phase), among other directions and challenges faced by this expansive field.

This talk will be the second in a series of Net Aesthetics 2.0 events. Panelists include artists Petra Cortright, Jennifer and Kevin Mccoy, Tom Moody, Tim Whidden and Damon Zucconi and will be moderated by curator, critic and Rhizome staff writer Ed Halter. Tickets available here.

Friday June 6th, 7:30pm
the New Museum, New York, NY
$8 general public, $6 Members (Rhizome and New Museum)
Presented in conjunction with Internet Week

Image: David Zucconi, Repeater, 2008

MORE »


Do You Know the Way to San Jose?

(0)


San Jose, California, is an interesting place. Home to a seriously diverse range of people and subcultures, it's best known as the epicenter of Silicon Valley and, as such, has seen a number facelifts with the waxing and waning of the "information economy." But no event changes the look of San Jose quite like 01SJ. On June 4-8, Zero1 will present their second biennial festival, the first of which coincided with the 2006 ISEA festival. Five days may not sound like a long time period, but a quick perusal of the festival's lineup will reveal the extent to which the performances, exhibitions, public installations, screenings, happenings, discussions, and other see-it-to-believe it events will overhaul not only the city's art venues and alternative spaces, but especially its mainstream pavilions, parks, and platforms. The suits won't know what hit them! The team behind 01SJ includes some of the most longstanding champions of new media art and their selections for this year's programs push the envelope and keep a very open mind as to what constitutes new media and where the field is headed. If you're anywhere near the West Coast, consider hotfooting it to this hotbed of creativity. - Marisa Olson


Image: Camille Utterback, Abundance, 2007

Link »


Editor's Note: Check Rhizome's blog later this week for daily reports from the 01SJ Festival by curator Michael Connor.

MORE »


Tuned City - Between sound and space speculation (1-5 Jul, Berlin)

(0)

tunedcity.jpg

"Tuned City - Between sound and space speculation" is an exhibition and conference project planned for July 01.-05. 2008 in Berlin which proposes a new evaluation of architectural spaces from the perspective of the acoustic.

The project draws the traditions of critical discussion about urban space within the architecture and urban planning discourse-- as well as its strategies and working methods--into the context of sound art. This expanded discussion re-enforces the potential of the spatial and communicative properties of sound as a tool and means of urban practice.

At the foundations of this event are artists' works and theoretical approaches which examine in a critical and sensitive way the given urban and architectural situations alongside their resulting socio-political implications, that re-use existing spaces or that conceive and open new spaces.

A dialogue will be built at the intersection of both disciplines which traces out the complex relations and interactions of space-sound, both presenting and testing new strategies, methods, possibilities and potentials of sound work within the artistic and applied context.

Tuned City is structured in two main segments -- symposium and site-specific installations.

On the individual days the symposium will approach the topic from five different theoretical and spatial perspectives. Spaces built for the production and reception of sound or acoustically flawed or impossible spaces, public and semi-public urban space, finished and planned spaces, wasteland or cultivated spaces, indoors and outdoors -- the chosen venues correspond with the individual topic of the day and offer plastic illustration and demonstration. Tuned City will try to break down the conventional conference format and to catalyse the discussion via the space in a mixture of academic talk, artistic presentation, performances, reports from working practice, demonstrations, and walks.

[CONTINUED]

MORE »

Originally posted on ../mediateletipos))) by pablo sanz


Another Fine Mess

(0)


A queasy blend of Phillip K. Dick and Paul Sharits, Randy Balma: Municipal Abortionist is the latest from art-game designer Mark Essen, a.k.a Messhof. Filled with strobing rainbow colors, overblown psychedelic explosions, giant bouncing baby-heads and a skull-pounding soundtrack of electronic noise beats, Randy Balma's audio-visual complexity reflects Messhof's experimental media background (a recent Bard grad, he studied filmmaking under the likes of Peggy Ahwesh and Les Leveque). But it also continues a strain of sadistically difficult yet tantalizingly ingenious game mechanics that has already made Essen's work notorious in indie gaming circles. For example, one level requires the player to drive a truck from one end of a straight-line highway to another. Easy, except for the fact that Balma is supposed to be "drugged up on drugs," thus the screen is constantly rotating and the games left-right controllers keep switching valences without warning. The more visually-minimal titles in the Messhof back catalog are even thornier. The abstracted Flywrench necessitates navigating a mere flapping line through neon-piped geometric environments using a maddeningly arbitrary array of button-combo protocols, while Punishment and its sequel Punishment: The Punishing are two seemingly simple platforms that become very difficult, very quickly. In his work, Essen combines the essence of old 2D arcade games-- misleadingly cute single-player titles that did everything they could to make you choke on that twenty-five cents-- with the viewer-challenging puzzle-logic of avant-garde cinema. He's currently working on a suite of new works that include a western-themed side-scroller, a bow-and-arrow shooter, and a stenography simulator, tentatively titled Stenography Hero. - Ed Halter


Image: Mark Essen/Messhof, Randy Balma: Municipal Abortionist, 2008

Link »

MORE »


My hard drive is experiencing some strange noises

(0)



Gregory Chatonsky's project uses sensors to translate (using Pure Data) the vibrations from a malfunctioning hard drive into sound.

[CONTINUED]

MORE »

Click through for an audio sample from Chatonsky's "My hard drive is experiencing some strange noises"

Originally posted on Ethan Ham by Rhizome


NMR Commission: “Storm King” by Amit Pitaru

(0)


Storm King by Amit Pitaru - The Sonic Wire Sculptor project was originally created by Pitaru as a personal instrument to compose, record and perform music. During concerts, audience members often inquired whether they could experience the tool first hand. This encouraged Pitaru to transform the software into a public installation. The installation included enhancements to the original work, allowing a wider range of users to intuitively interact with the instrument. Gallery visitors would enter a dark room with a surround-sound system, a projection and a unique drawing station. Opening nights for these exhibits would often double as performance and workshop events where audience and artist explore the tool together. Participants would be encouraged to add their work to a steadily growing collection of beautiful and surprising sonic-sculptures. Today, this collection includes work from professional illustrators, poets, 9 year-olds and their parents, and musicians of various genres.

In 2007, Turbulence commissioned Amit Pitaru to compose and perform a new piece with "The Sonic Wire Sculptor Machine." The resulting work, Storm King, was completed in May 2008. It includes an online video and downloadable MP3 of Pitaru performing.

Storm King is a 2007 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc., for Networked Music Review. It was made possible with funding from the New York State Music Fund, established by the New York State Attorney General at Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors.

[CONTINUED]

MORE »

Originally posted on Networked Music Review by helen


Bringing the Outside In

(0)


Bill Shannon (a.k.a. the "Crutch Master") is a choreographer and dancer who refuses to call himself by either title. Though he needs crutches to move, because of a bilateral hip deformity, this fact has proven itself anything but a disability in relationship to his creativity. The New York-based artist responds largely to the nature of life and change in urban environments and his street-based dance performances-- in which he balances on moving skateboards, maneuvers around concrete steps, and generally gets down-- could put many of the city's legendary b-boys to shame. Through June 15th, the artist has created a multimedia installation in a temporary space in New York's Chinatown. Though Shannon is a highly-regarded performer, he's always made such installations and this former sweatshop provides a perfect platform and social context for further exposure of his efforts to address the inner experience of those roaming the urban outdoors. Entitled "WORK," the installation is organized by Washington, DC-based gallery Douz and Mille and Shannon describes his videos and salvage-based installation as a visualization of a search for balance-- an apt metaphor, given the nature of his performance work. - Marisa Olson


Image: Bill Shannon, Attempts (Video Still, from installation "WORK"), 2008.

Link »

MORE »


Sounds from Old New York

(0)


In the seventy years since it last served as a major terminal for Brooklyn-bound ferries, the Battery Maritime Building has existed in relative disuse, accumulating signs of rust and decay common to the structures and sites of older eras of New York City. But with Playing the Building, a Creative Time-sponsored installation by David Byrne that opened this past weekend in the Great Hall, the building once again comes alive in clamorous sonority, producing a rendition of its own material history played upon its very body. Developing upon a project proposal for Färgfabriken, in Stockholm, Byrne has retrofitted a vintage Weaver pump organ with a bundle of relays and wires, which rise from its backside and spread, like a snaky canopy, over the 9,000 square-foot room. Each note of the organ triggers a particular event and sound in the space: lower keys power motors that vibrate the hall's girders, causing muffled rumbles; middle tones generate flute-like sounds from heating pipes; and higher notes cause spring-loaded solenoids to bang and clang on columns and radiators. The installation thus produces a strangely phenomenal field, all the more surprising given the absence of microphones, amplification and electronics in supplementing the building's performance. Even more importantly, it activates the audience by allowing members to take turns playing the organ. As Byrne remarked, in an interview with Playing the Building curator Anne Pasternak, "It became a kind of social apparatus as well as being an installation. It became a shared communal experience." -- Tyler Coburn


Image: David Byrne, Playing the Building, 2008

Link »

MORE »


Ryoji Ikeda - Dream Amsterdam 2008

(0)

6 Jun 08 // Dream Amsterdam 2008: Opening Event (Paradiso, Amsterdam, NL)
6 -- 21 Jun 08 // Site-specific installations - Various locations, Amsterdam, NL
21 Jun 08 // Live open air sound installation, Venue TBA, Amsterdam, NL

spectra [amsterdam] is artist and composer Ryoji Ikeda's commission for dream amsterdam 2008; his first project for a public space and his first large-scale work pushing the creative possibilities of light to its utmost extremes. Selected architectural features in industrial, civic and open public spaces emanate blinding white light for several hours every evening, in an unearthly, unforgettable experience. Visitors navigate between the sites following a map that connects the distant points of a visceral urban constellation. Ikeda is an internationally acclaimed composer and sound artist who creates highly technologised installations that play with human perception, in concerts, installations and recordings integrating sound, acoustics and sublime imagery derived from pure mathematics and the endless sea of data in the world. He is the second artist chosen by dream amsterdam to realise a vision for the city using its streets and buildings as a source of inspiration, as a medium, as studio and as exhibition space. Spencer Tunick was the first artist commissioned by dream amsterdam and in 2007 worked with two thousand naked people across the city in a car park, a petrol station, a canal, on bicycles and in a tulip field.

The energy used for the light installations is generated from sustainable, recycled resources. The site-specific art projects can be viewed from 6 June until 21 June 2008 in the evening hours. A detailed map with the locations and a route can be found from 6 June at dreamasterdam.nl.

Co-produced by Forma and Dream Amsterdam Foundation. Dream Amsterdam takes place within the frame of the Holland Festival
[CONTINUED]

MORE »

Originally posted on ../mediateletipos))) by pablo sanz


Massive Links! Events and Essential Web Documents Edition

(0)

  • Prompted by a lecture artist Marcin Ramocki was asked to give at the Nova Scotia School of Art and Design, Ramocki put together what is now a 13 page document on surf clubs. The document provides information ranging from the most basic observations about surf clubs and to much more complex structures. In particular, I liked the observations in section 4.5, which describe how communication works on these blogs (ie, posting organized content by a challenger, and its decoding by other participants). Ramocki's lecture is pretty much an essential web document on surfing clubs, so I anticipate discussing it a greater length on the blog.
  • MORE »


    The above is a small excerpt from Paddy/Art Fag City's "Massive Links!" post from earlier today. Ramocki's article provides a historical and conceptual framework for understanding surf clubs. While there's certainly been ample discussion surrounding the practice online, Marcin Ramocki's summation of the genesis and trajectory of surf clubs is an important contribution.

    Rhizome readers should also view the online exhibition "Professional Surfer," curated by Lauren Cornell, which brings together a number of the artists discussed in Ramocki's article.

    Originally posted on Art Fag City by Rhizome