Posts for July 2008

ADSL (2008) by Aleksandra Domanovic

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ADSL (2008) by Aleksandra Domanovic

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Copy That!

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A new copyright-related exhibition curated by Inke Arns and Francis Hunger, of Hartware MedienKunstVerein, in Dortmund (DE), has one heck of a title: "Anna Kournikova Deleted By Memeright Trusted System: Art in the Age of Intellectual Property." Then again, it sounds like a heck of a show. The first piece visitors will see when they enter the HMKV exhibition space is a video by Negativland and Tim Maloney, called Gimme the Mermaid, in which Disney's Little Mermaid character is seen shouting, "You can't use it without my permission...I'm gonna sue your ass!" The exhibit, which runs July 19-October 19 is part of a larger initiative called "Work 2.0: Copyright and Creative Work in the Digital Age," which includes a iRights.info, web-based research project exploring new labor relations emerging in this litigious era; and a September 26-28 symposium on "Creative Work and Copyright." The show features a good mix of established artists in that field as well as others from the world of fine art and media production, including Christophe Bruno, Nate Harrison, John Heartfield, Kembrew McLeod, Monochrom, Alexei Shulgin + Aristarkh Chernyshev, Cornelia Sollfrank, Stay Free, UBERMORGEN.COM + Alessandro Ludovico + Paolo Cirio, and others. The show's title is plucked from a short story by participating artist David Rice who writes of a time in the future when stars' brands are maintained by laserbeam-armed satellites who snuff out unauthorized copycats. In the story, the "real" tennis star Anna Kournikova is accidentally misrecognized as a fake and "deleted" by the system. These sorts of sci-fi narratives always provide a touchstone for public fears and fantasies about the future, particularly in relationship to technology. This exhibition emerges from a contemporary context in which the development of new technologies that make copying easier have led to unprecedentedly stringent ...

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Interactivos? workshop: Biophionitos

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Another project developed last month during Vision Play, one of the Interactivos? workshops organized by Medialab Prado in Madrid. This time I asked Horacio González and Paola Guimerans to tell us something about biophionitos, a project they developed together with Igor Gonzáez and other collaborators.

Biophionitos generates artificial life using a system similar to the zoetrope, an early animation device that produces an illusion of action from a rapid succession of static pictures. Horacio González, Paola Guimerans and Igor González added to the concept a touch of Processing and a whiff of Arduino to develop an interface able to create a physical animation which runs in an old-style but interactive phenakistoscope (one of them reacts to your caresses, another one wakes up when you talk to it, etc).

This virtual pet created with the system is made of a limited series of simple polygons which the program has modified in order to give the drawing what looks like a biological life.

The artists also uploaded online a tutorial to do your own Biophionitos.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Tactical Biopolitics: Art, Activism, and Technoscience

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Tactical Biopolitics: Art, Activism, and Technoscience; Edited by Beatriz da Costa and Kavita Philip -- Popular culture in this "biological" seems to feed on proliferating fears, anxieties, and hopes around the life sciences at a time when such basic concepts as scientific truth, race and gender identity, and the human itself are destabilized in the public eye. Tactical Biopolitics suggests that the political challenges at the intersection of life, science, and art are best addressed through a combination of artistic intervention, critical theorizing, and reflective practices. Transcending disciplinary boundaries, contributions to this volume focus on the political significance of recent advances in the biological sciences and explore the possibility of public participation in scientific discourse, drawing on research and practice in art, biology, critical theory, anthropology, and cultural studies.

After framing the subject in terms of both biology and art, Tactical Biopolitics discusses such topics as race and genetics (with contributions from leading biologists Richard Lewontin and Richard Levins); feminist bioscience; the politics of scientific expertise; bioart and the public sphere (with an essay by artist Claire Pentecost); activism and public health (with an essay by Treatment Action Group co-founder Mark Harrington); biosecurity after 9/11 (with essays by artists' collective Critical Art Ensemble and anthropologist Paul Rabinow); and human-animal interaction (with a framing essay by cultural theorist Donna Haraway).

Contributors: Gaymon Bennett, Larry Carbone, Karen Cardozo, Gary Cass, Beatriz da Costa, Oron Catts, Gabriella Coleman, Critical Art Ensemble, Gwen D'Arcangelis, Troy Duster, Donna Haraway, Mark Harrington, Jens Hauser, Kathy High, Fatimah Jackson, Gwyneth Jones, Jonathan King, Richard Levins, Richard Lewontin, Rachel Mayeri, Sherie McDonald, Claire Pentecost, Kavita Philip, Paul Rabinow, Banu Subramanian, subRosa, Abha Sur, Samir Sur, Jacqueline Stevens, Eugene Thacker, Paul Vanouse, Ionat Zurr.

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Originally posted on networked_performance by Rhizome


Tactical Biopolitics: Art, Activism, and Technoscience

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  <center><img src="http://transition.turbulence.org/blog/images/2008/07/0262042495-f30.jpg"></center>

Tactical Biopolitics: Art, Activism, and Technoscience; Edited by Beatriz da Costa and Kavita Philip -- Popular culture in this "biological" seems to feed on proliferating fears, anxieties, and hopes around the life sciences at a time when such basic concepts as scientific truth, race and gender identity, and the human itself are destabilized in the public eye. Tactical Biopolitics suggests that the political challenges at the intersection of life, science, and art are best addressed through a combination of artistic intervention, critical theorizing, and reflective practices. Transcending disciplinary boundaries, contributions to this volume focus on the political significance of recent advances in the biological sciences and explore the possibility of public participation in scientific discourse, drawing on research and practice in art, biology, critical theory, anthropology, and cultural studies.

After framing the subject in terms of both biology and art, Tactical Biopolitics discusses such topics as race and genetics (with contributions from leading biologists Richard Lewontin and Richard Levins); feminist bioscience; the politics of scientific expertise; bioart and the public sphere (with an essay by artist Claire Pentecost); activism and public health (with an essay by Treatment Action Group co-founder Mark Harrington); biosecurity after 9/11 (with essays by artists' collective Critical Art Ensemble and anthropologist Paul Rabinow); and human-animal interaction (with a framing essay by cultural theorist Donna Haraway).

Contributors: Gaymon Bennett, Larry Carbone, Karen Cardozo, Gary Cass, Beatriz da Costa, Oron Catts, Gabriella Coleman, Critical Art Ensemble, Gwen D'Arcangelis, Troy Duster, Donna Haraway, Mark Harrington, Jens Hauser, Kathy High, Fatimah Jackson, Gwyneth Jones, Jonathan King, Richard Levins, Richard Lewontin, Rachel Mayeri, Sherie McDonald, Claire Pentecost, Kavita Philip, Paul Rabinow, Banu Subramanian, subRosa, Abha Sur, Samir Sur, Jacqueline Stevens, Eugene Thacker, Paul Vanouse, Ionat Zurr.

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Originally posted on networked_performance by Rhizome


Getting Sand in the Art

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Has anyone noticed that it's summer in much of the world? Inspired by this deeply intellectual curatorial premise, a number of beach-based art invitations have been hitting our inboxes. The fiery purple and magenta gradient html invite for Glow Santa Monica reads, "Whether you get your brain waves translated onto a LED display or find yourself lost in a Neptunian lair of a surreal persuasion, please join us on July 19th to spend the night and greet the dawn with others so inclined as to believe our common spaces can be playful, inspiring, and thought-provoking, not just functional." If you are so inclined, and in the neighborhood, a visit to the Santa Monica beach, pier, and Palisades park from 7pm-7am, July 19-20 will put you in contact with installations by highly-regarded artists like Usman Haque and Shih Chieh Huang, and installations organized by such venerable orgs as Machine Project, VJ Culture, and the 18th Street Arts Center. The works slated for inclusion are colorful, interactive, luminescent (perhaps not surprisingly, given the promising title), and big...as in ambitious. There will also be all-night DJ sets and live performances. Now, you could throw on some swim trunks and flip flops to see work like this in a museum, but we're guessing it wouldn't be the same. - Marisa Olson


Image: Grant Davis, Video RIOT!

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A Message to the World

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A couple of months ago, a message appeared on the roof of Steve Turner Contemporary Art, loosely painted in white across a black ground, reading "Help Us." Given the gallery's location, just across Wilshire Boulevard from the Los Angeles County Museum or Art (LACMA) and the dazzling new home for all things blue-chip, The Broad Contemporary Art Museum, one would be tempted to infer a dissenting tone in the sign, made by Los Angeles artist Mark Bradford. But as Bradford's message is not actually visible to the windowless buildings surrounding the gallery, and can only properly be seen from the air and via a live video feed the gallery has established, it's clear that the artist's SOS reaches beyond the limits of contemporary art. Bradford adopts a fundamental position of appeal that is heavily colored by its similarities to those of Hurricane Katrina victims, including Angela Antoinette Perkins, who repeated these very words outside the New Orleans Convention Center, on September 1st 2005, and roused survivors into a chant. Seen through this lens, the selective visibility Bradford grants his piece may reference the infamous account of Bush flying over New Orleans while returning from vacation, as well as the extent to which Katrina, like most contemporary disasters, was delivered unto the majority of the world populous through varying levels of technological mediation: mass-media all the way down to cell-phone videos. The gallery's video feed feels particularly poignant, in this regard, in that it documents, in real-time, a message that has already been painted and that never changes. With each day that elapses, in other words, Bradford's entreaty only more compellingly tells its story of expectation, desperation and thwarted relief. - Tyler Coburn


Image: Mark Bradford, HELP US: An Installation (Aerial View), 2008

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BRENDA RAY: WORLD VOICES PROJECT

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BRENDA RAY: WORLD VOICES PROJECT
A SOUND INSTALLATION OF NEARLY 50 VOICES FROM DIFFERENT
COUNTRIES FEATURING THE READING OF EXCERPTS OF THE DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS

JULY 20-AUGUST 3, 2008, SOUTH STREET SEAPORT

New York, NY (July 1, 2008) From July 20 through August 3, 2008, nearly 50 different voices reading the United Nation's Universal Declaration of Human Rights may be heard in World Voices Project. An engaging and poetic sound installation created by artist Brenda Ray, this project is a celebration of the 60th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Human Rights. Held at The South Street Seaport, Pier 17, Third Floor Atrium, Fulton and South Streets, admission to the event is free and open to the public. Hours are: Weekdays 12-7pm, weekends 12-9pm. Opening reception: Sunday, July 20, 6-9pm. For more information, contact 212.477.0961 or log on to www.worldvoicesproject.com.

Brenda Ray began the World Voices Project two years ago, and the project continues to evolve. She has interviewed friends, colleagues and artists from different countries, covering nearly 50 nations and different languages. Among the many voice recordings are languages such as Tigrinya of Eritrea, Amharic of Ethiopia, Mongolian, Zulu and Shona of Zimbabwe.

Letting each voice speak for itself, Ray taped the readings with little treatment. At South Street Seaport, she has installed a jungle of hanging headphones, offering a pristine listening environment. Several headphones include multiple languages mixed together, transforming the recordings into a mosaic of sounds with the understanding that our common humanity transcends language barriers.

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Originally posted on LMCC Blog by Rhizome


circle up now

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circle up now uses "human aerial art" to draw attention to issues of human rights, social justice and freedom. on july 12th, in 20 locations across the world, from kathmandu to tel-aviv to mexico, they organized thousands of amnesty international supporters to join together to form images of the words "freedom," "dignity" and "justice" representing the principles of the universal declaration of human rights. you can see more photos from circle up now's global day of action right here.

[all from circle up now's global day of action, july 12, 2008. top to bottom: malmoe, sweden. bamako, mali. karnataka, india.]

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Originally posted on i heart photograph by Rhizome


don't look at the carpet

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Originally posted on out_4_pizza by Rhizome