Posts for July 2008

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"Fragments from the Edge of Los Angeles (detail 1)", 2001,

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Preliminary image for "The Triumph of Democracy", 2008,

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"ether machine", 2007,

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"www.automaticcity.com", 2007 by Benjamin Edwards.

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


The Quiet Storm

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Understated, conceptual gestures predominate in "Quiet Politics," a timely group exhibition currently on display at New York's Zwirner & Wirth. Felix Gonzalez-Torres' single string of lights "Untitled" (for New York) (1992) hangs from the ceiling of the front room and ends, in a tangle, on the floor: an arrangement, at once elegant and casual, that the artist relinquishes to the person installing the work. Lining the gallery hallway are photograms from Lisa Oppenheim's series Multicultural Crayon Displacement (2008), in which the artist employs a vintage, additive color process to generate deceptively straightforward geometric abstractions. Color rectangles overlap in arrays of hybrid tones and, at their center, a fleshy pigment corresponds to one of the crayons in Crayola Company's 'multicultural' set. Oppenheim's additive production of multicultural colors thus parallels the way race is constructed and categorized in social discourse. A similar disjunction between representation and narrative is evident in Christopher Williams' eerie photographs of Harvard University Botanical Museum's collection of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century life-size, glass flowers. The species the artist chose were particular to twenty-seven countries flagged in a 1986 Commission on International Humanitarian Issues report for human rights abuses. As with Oppenheim's series, Williams' titles signal the conceptual envelope for these beguiling still-lives, listing the names of their origin countries and genus. While other strategies also enter the exhibition, this marriage of formal sophistication and social and political inquiry characterizes the most resonant works, underscoring a point recently made by Francis Alÿs, during his last exhibition at David Zwirner: "sometimes doing something poetic can become political, and sometimes doing something political can become poetic." - Tyler Coburn

Image: Lisa Oppenheim, Multicultural Crayon Displacement (Peach, II), 2008

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On Top of the Fold: Art

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Steve Lambert's Add Art project (a 2008 Rhizome Commission co-developed with the artist's colleagues in the Eyebeam R&D lab) offers home-delivery art exhibitions in the form of your Firefox browser window. Internet users who download Lambert's free open source plug-in will see an aesthetic overhaul in the sites they visit, as advertisements are replaced by visual art created or curated by a different guest, every two weeks. The project is a perfect outgrowth of Lambert's involvement with the Anti-Advertising Agency, who work to co-opt "the tools and structures used by the advertising and public relations industries" to call into question "the purpose and effects of advertising in public space." These efforts have manifested in forms ranging from bus shelter ads and stickers to ideologically-bent think tanks and objects of propaganda. With a keen awareness of the impact of advertising on public space, the move to the internet--where so many of us dwell and encounter a daily barrage of ads--is a thoughtful one. Rather than offering yet another software tool for blocking-out advertisements, Add Art fills this space with something more intriguing, and the biweekly exhibits that have thus far been presented successfully generate discourse about value, aesthetics, and the contextual frameworks within which we receive information about the world. The current show (imagine each ad box in your browser window as a gallery) is a rather humorous and almost absurdly literal take on the context of adding art to your field of vision by replacing ads with it. Charles Broskoski essentially blacks-out the ad boxes on sites with his contribution, which is a collection of digital reproductions of famous black monochromatic paintings, cropped, resized to the proper specs, and optimized for the net--meaning that these paintings by the likes of Rauchenberg, Kelly, Malevich, Marden, Reinhardt ...

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blue explosion

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Originally posted on spirit surfers by sounder2


robert overweg

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robert overweg's 'hidden persuaders' project. as he explains: "magazine ads are digitally retouched and ridden from their products, branding, and other type, leaving the bare visual surroundings...eroticized glitter and abstracted glamour unfolds. esthetics of consumption are laid bare in the process." see more here.

[all robert overweg. from the series hidden persuaders.]

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Originally posted on i heart photograph by Rhizome


Futures Exchange

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Science fiction provides the thesis for "The Future as Disruption," the latest show at The Kitchen in New York, but not the kind of escapist space-opera kid stuff of embossed-cover paperbacks and Lucasfilm productions. Rather, the authors explicitly referenced here could be found in the New York Review of Books or a college syllabus: George Orwell, Samuel Delaney, J. G. Ballard, and Philip K. Dick. Notably, all these sci-fi titans are known for linguistic (or indeed meta-linguistic) dexterity, undermining the normal use of language so as to propel the reader if not forward in time than sideways in reality; likewise, this isn't a show so much about tomorrows as speculative todays. In homage, many of the works in the exhibit refer heavily to text: Sean Dack's Future Songs, a book of musical arrangements for predictions penned by Dick in 1981 (one: "The Soviet Union will test a propulsion drive that moves a starship at the velocity of light; a pilot ship will set out for Proxima Centaurus soon to [be] followed by an American ship."), Adam Pendleton's flat duochrome paintings reproducing excerpts from Delaney's 1975 novel Dhalgren and phrases written by artist Liam Gillick, Olalekan B. Jeyifous and Matty Vaz's Adverspeak, a set of pseudo-corporate diagrams, flowcharts and maps that could have been lifted off the set of Idiocracy, Mungo Thomson self-explanatory audio work "Bloody Hell: An Oral History of the Making of Blade Runner," by Dave Gardetta, Los Angeles Magazine, February 2007, Read by a Cast of Computer Voices, and, most startlingly, Julieta Aranda's A Machine of Perpetual Possibility, a Perspex cube containing the dust of pulverized science fiction novels, occasionally whirled by spurts of an air jet. Aranda's accompanying photographs of book-dust resemble alien environments, another theme here, also seen in ...

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pulsating emotion organism

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a fascinating live visualisation of recent emotional expressions written on the private weblogs published on blogger.com. emotional expressions are parsed according to a list of synonyms, which then physically transform an abstract shape-shifting object.

textual expressions are assigned to 1 of 8 basic human emotions, which are represented as a 3D cone consisting of 24 distinct areas. this abstract diagram forms the basic shape of "pulse", a physical object that is able to enlarge in 24 different directions. each time a specific expressionistic emotion is found in a blog entry written during the last minute, the shapeshifting object transforms itself, so that that the new physical volume represents a piece of the world's current emotional condition.

[link: markuskison.de|thnx Monika!]

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Originally posted on information aesthetics by Rhizome


Reflow

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Inside Gecko (image above, two example videos below) is a Processing visualisation of how Gecko constructs pages in the browser as it receives them from the internet. Created by Satoshi Ueyama, the purpose of this work is not art as such but does do two interesting things. The work functions as an interesting way of visualising HTML page form which is largely overlooked because of it's content. By doing this it creates connections with abstract painters such as Piet Mondrian, Peter Halley and so on who also look at grid like form structures. The work also creates an automated way of doing this by subverting information intended for a browser, this closes allies it with many art browsers but also net.art such as Chris Ashley's HTML paintings, Peter Baldes animated gif works etc. which subvert the arrangement of the content.

Above reflow process of mozilla.org.

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Originally posted on Network Research by Rhizome


Mr. Roboto

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Machines have assisted people in creating images for centuries. From the camera obscura to the overhead and slide projectors to the photocopier, these mostly light-based tools have helped make light work of creating mimetic images. More recently, artists have started focusing on the machines themselves (this includes algorithmic software bots), letting them make the work, rather than simply assisting in the process. Of course, this all depends on how you define the work and the act of making it. Jürg Lehni has begun creating robotic spraypainting machines with names like Hector, Rita, or Viktor, anthropomorphic monikers that recall early fantasies -- or anxieties -- about the robots that would eventually replace human workers. The Swiss artist doesn't seem worried about losing his job. In fact, he's a master delegator, collaborating with (one might even say outsourcing to) others who help determine the form and content of the drawings that his machines will make. A show open July 9 - August 31 at the London ICA, entitled "A Recent History of Writing and Drawing," will display a variety of mechanical devices for art-making, centering around Viktor. Lehni has teamed-up with British graphic designer Alex Rich to program Viktor's mark-makings in such a way as to initiate a conversation about the role of technologies in expression, primarily by inviting the public to join workshops which allow them to participate in the drawings and to view demonstrations by other practitioners who'll use Viktor to make their own work. This overlapping melange of users gets to the heart of the project. As curator Emily King says, "Moving away from the blunt duality of man vs. machine, it is now possible to appreciate the particular qualities of various forms of mechanical and digital mark-making." This all begs the question of whether it's ...

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Live Stage: Space of Sound [London]

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Sound, Space, Visuality and Emotional Geographies of Violence - everri in conversation with Gabriela Salgado (Public Programme Curator, Tate Modern) :: July 10, 2008, 7:00 - 8:00 pm :: Delfina Foundation, 29 Catherine Place, London :: Reservations: RSVP [at] delfinafoundation.com

The memory of a sound is a peculiar mechanism, and its resonance is shared collectively. In her artistic practice, Clemencia Echeverri tries to capture the particular element of sound that, whilst echoing the present, conjures up past experiences through evocations, archetypal relationships and a sense of place. In a seemingly passive way, the sound that dwells within each of us eventually becomes neutralized by cultural and educational forces, which act as filters and, in many cases, prevent us from hearing.

Presenting 4 of Clemencia's recent video pieces, the discussion will focus on "the sounds that reaches distances where the intimate fuses with the social, where the passing voice is symbolically filtered through internal and external spaces, where nature guards its own sounds and secrets of historical violence."

Perhaps art is the witness that allows us to hear all this evocative and archetypal material?

Clemencia Echeverri studied Fine Art at Chelsea College of Art and Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin, Colombia. She was an international resident artist at the Delfina Studio Trust, and has exhibited her work internationally. Clemencia currently lives and work in Colombia. She teaches Art at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia and Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin.

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Originally posted on Networked Music Review by jo