Posts for July 2008

[no title]

(0)

Installation view of "Passé Immédiat", 2007 by Christian Philipp Müller. About 600 outdated computers, monitors, keyboards, printers… (partly running).

MORE »

Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


Modern Ruin

(0)

Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle
Always After (The Glass House) (still) 2006
Super 16mm film, transferred to HD digital video, single-channel projection exhibited from HD DVD, 16:9, colour, mono, 9:41 minute loop
Image courtesy: The artist and Galeri­a Soledad Lorenzo, Madrid.
Copy right: Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle



Queensland Art Gallery Modern Ruin
An Australian Cinematheque exhibition and film program
12 July - 12 October 2008 Stanley Place
South Bank
Brisbane
Australia
http://www.qag.qld.gov.au/home

A rich vein of contemporary artistic practice revaluates the utopian dreams of the modern period. "Modern Ruin" brings together artists and filmmakers who look back to modern art, architecture and design in order to visually and critically explore their historical failures. The profusion of recent images of modern ruins in art and film can be seen both as a response to particular physical and aesthetic qualities, and also as a metaphor for loss. The works in the exhibition and film program speak of living in the ruins of Modernism; some translate a mood of disappointment, while others are imbued with a melancholy sense of dreams half-remembered. They examine the decay, detritus and survivals of historical modernity.

Ruination is the shadow of progress and utopian thinking. From the Enlightenment, the idea of the modern was associated with the creation of new bodies of knowledge, progress and the perfection of self and society. From the second half of the nineteenth century, modernity came to signify industrialisation and urbanisation. Modernism as a movement in art, literature, architecture and design, is associated with the avant-gardes of the early twentieth century, with radical innovation and the creation of new languages. A return by artists and filmmakers to Modernism's purified forms and autonomous objects represents an attempt to imagine new meanings for them. The forms of the past ...

MORE »

Originally posted on e-flux shows :: rss by Rhizome


Jenny Holzer’s PROJECTIONS at MASS MOCA

(0)

Jenny Holzer


Web cam of the install through November 16, 2008

MORE »

Originally posted on MTAA Reference Resource by M.River


August @ - empyre - : Models and perspectives for Media Centers and Net Art organizations

(0)

Lately, a number of institutions, based on more or less conventional models, seem to be focusing on fomenting art and culture created with digital, networked and portable devices. This is not a new phenomenon, but there seem to be different approaches, and a variety of unfoldings that shift away from the classic MediaLAB models, as the convergence of art, science and technology no longer seems to be dominant on a field nowadays diverse enough to range from social and educational perspectives to artistic experimentation of all kinds. There are mixed scenarios, on this context, in which digital culture reaches places such as China and India, while mobile and wireless networks adds layers of complexity to our connected society. At the same time open source communities grow, as well as approaches to alternative / recycled devices, and a number of organizations seem to provide air for those developments to consolidate, despite their distance from the corporate agendas. To discuss possible models and perspectives for media centers and net art organizations, representatives from institutions or independent initiatives in Brazil, England and US will share their experiences, aiming to debate differences and similarities as well as possible challenges and / or local peculiarities. How are we reacting to an epoch when, says Ned Rossiter, "there is urgent need for new institutional forms that reflect "relational" processes to challenge existing systems of governance and outmoded representational structures"? - empyre -'s guests for this month are Anne Nigten (V2, Rotterdam / Netherlands), Gabriel Menotti (Cinefalcatrua, Vitoria/ Brazil), Gisela Domschke (MediaLAB MIS, Sao Paulo / Brazil), Marc Garrett (Furtherfield, London / UK) and Sarah Cook (Eyebeam, New York / US). Later on the month, Amanda McDonald Crowley, also from Eyebeam and already an - empyre - guest on former discussions, will join the debate. To follow the discussion, subscribe to - empyre - @ https://mail.cofa.unsw ...

MORE »

Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Team Spoof

(0)


In the days of DIY online publishing, what we once knew as agitprop has increasingly taken the form of parasitic media. In such projects, activists leech qualities from the web presence of the host they intend to critique and use these visual resemblances (logos, site maps, page layouts, even URLs) to mimic their opponent in parallel sites that shoot off rather rhizomatically. Like a scientific parasite, the activist lives off the host, but what really thrives is the self-referential critique enabled by this form of parody. The Italian collective, Les Liens Invisibles, excels at initiatives such as these. In their open source project, Fake is a Fake, they make it easy for internet users with access to free Word Press blogging software to mimic high profile sites like news and government agencies, while inserting their own statements. "If at one time or another in your life you wanted to speak with 'the master's voice,'" they say, "then you are ready for our brand new fake-publishing services!" Constantly updated and refined by a group of devoted developers, the list of available spoofs continues to grow. Their most recent (ironically credited to Luther Blissett, the open source nom de plume--taken from the given name of a Jamaican footballer--originated in Italy for hundreds of worldwide activists) uses the upcoming games in Beijing as a backdrop for discussing China's attitude towards human rights. In the announcement of the Peking 2008 site, they declared, "While the Olympic curtain softly falls on the Chinese repression in Tibet, the imaginary art-group Les Liens Invisibles celebrates the upcoming Olympic Games with a new fake-based hybridation between art, activism, and advertising strategies." The ubiquity and recognizability of branded messages make them particularly vulnerable to such forms of plagiarism. The artists' disclaimer for Fake is a ...

MORE »


Interview with Aleksandra Domanovic

(0)

Aleksandra Domanovic is a Berlin-based artist who works primarily on the internet. Much of her art contrasts and recontextualizes content derived online, such as found videos and Google Maps, in an effort to establish a dialogue between these different materials. I interviewed her via email. - Ceci Moss

You were born in Serbia, grew up in Slovenia and now reside in Berlin. Has this transnationalism inflected your work? How so?

I was born in Serbia, but in a Slovakian minority in Vojvodina. Hmm, I can't say how this expresses in my work...most of the artists I know are global nomads. I have a blurred sense of nationality and have no real feeling of belonging anywhere, which may explain my obsession with maps. I also lived in Vienna for six years and spend some time in Tokyo before moving to Berlin, and for now I still enjoy not having a permanent residence.

As a blogger for VVORK, you obviously spend a lot of time surfing the web. How does this daily routine influence your practice as an artist?

I became an artist through and with VVORK. Studying graphic design, but always making video on the side, I joined VVORK about one week after it was founded by Oliver, Georg and Christoph. Surfing the web extensively, seeing so much good work and discovering it for myself, motivated me.

You completed two projects which paired online mapping and video: Srbija Do Tokia and Tesla. Could you explain the concept behind these two works?

There are 3 pages: Srbija Do Tokia, Tesla and Holivud, all written as they are pronounced in Serbian language, which is the grammatically correct way of writing foreign words in Serbia. All reflect Serbian nationalism and the recent independence of Kosovo. The day after the declaration, there were videos ...

MORE »


The Next Big Thing in Humanities, Arts and Social Science Computing: Cultural Analytics

(0)

Hypertext. Hypermedia. High Performance Computing. It's enough to make a humanities scholar hyperventilate. A debate has raged in the last decade (at least) about whether or not the Digital Age will see the death of The Book, The Library and perhaps, The Humanities more broadly. Part of the debate resides in the historical separation that began with Erasmus and the Renaissance, where "hard" was divorced from the "soft" sciences and arts -- a division that is still visible both geographically and intellectually on university campuses, as well as amongst scholarly disciplines themselves. But some see the reciprocal and perhaps limitless possibilities of emergent technologies and humanities scholarship -- how digital technology cuts across disciplines, creates new ways of looking at artifacts, as well as producing new forms itself.

[CONTINUED]

MORE »

A lengthy interview with artist and academic Lev Manovich appeared in HPCwire this week. In it, Manovich discusses his research and interest in cultural analytics.

Originally posted on Features by Rhizome