Posts for February 2008

Postmasters Gallery: Diana Cooper, Overdrive -- Saturday, February 23, 6 - 8PM

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Postmasters Gallery

459 West 19th Street,
Chelsea


Diana Cooper

Defying easy categorization Diana Cooper is best known for expanding the idea of drawing into the third dimension to create dense, line-driven sculptural hybrids. Essentially abstract, yet projecting an inherent sense of systems, networks and circuitry, Cooper's works bridge the organic and technological realm. They transcend the childlike doodling of repetition, multiplication and absent-mindedness to create complex spatial units where spontaneity and control, chaos and order, joy and seriousness coexist.

Cooper says:
I am fascinated by maps, subway systems, color-coding, the relationships between macroscopic and microscopic imagery. But I always feel that I operate by osmosis. I really am influenced by the visual world. I want the work to have a sensuality and visual impact. And I think a lot of systems are visual. Systems are a way people try to make sense of things or create order. They also are all around us, in the natural world and in the man-made world, and I am intrigued by how they intersect, echo one another, or come into conflict. But I am less drawn to the specific content or narrative of a given system, which for me is just raw material. In fact, I am interested when something like a diagram or a graph disassociates itself from its origin and becomes something else entirely.


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Originally posted on ArtCal Openings by Rhizome


C'mon everybody!

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The lyrics in "World Peace" (1999), an early song by the Japanese multidisciplinary art collective Delaware, praise a celebratory vision of seemingly disparate cultures finding unity in difference. Jumping ahead eight years, this theme reaches a nice materialization in Delaware's practice with the release of the YouTubeHarmony videos (2007). The Harmonies are four-corner, international jam sessions featuring musicians, dancers and random people talking or goofing around with friends, all remixed into solid, often surprising mixes by Delaware. In YouTubeHARMONY 4 Apple Pie, for example, Liz Luttinger plays a dreamy melody on a Casio SK-10 in the lower left corner while YouTube user paulagloria gently talks us through the process of making her mother's apple pie in the upper left. Another user, holaitsmak, demonstrates some ballet pointe work in the upper right while Peahix demonstrates the functionality of an early beat box in the lower right. As the mix progresses, Delaware insert a couple more ballet dancers, Sean Ray's banjo picking, and the duo of Ichi and Ichi's sister playing the Beatles. The most effective element of Apple Pie and all of the Harmonies, however, is the detachment of the audio from each visual component. As the audio plays at the originally recorded speed, the video drastically slows down, rendering the visuals as something like ghostly mnemonics for personal histories. The overall impact of the videos serve to abstract each individual component into a larger whole, aptly echoing Delaware's call for world unity. - Gene McHugh

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Test_Lab: Multi_modal

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Test_Lab: Multi_modal
date: 21 Feb 2008 - 20:00
location: V2_ Institute for the Unstable Media
Groundfloor, Eendrachtsstraat 10, Rotterdam (NL).
admission: free
Featuring: Arjen Mulder (NL), Sissel Tolaas (N), Tom Froese (UK), Graham Smith (CDN), Ulf Langheinrich (A), and Sietske Klooster (NL).

[The event will be STREAMED LIVE (requires RealPlayer)]

Although technological innovation in art and media has greatly enhanced the ways in which artworks can stimulate our senses, this innovation predominantly concerns the same few sensory modalities, and only rarely aims at supporting the integration between them. Recent artistic Research and Development (aRt&D) has, however, made great progress in developing methods for multimodal art; enhancing the sensorial richness of art and media experiences in integrated ways.

Test_Lab: Multimodal will demonstrate and discuss new methods and technologies to stimulate senses that are not commonly incorporated in artistic concepts, and will introduce innovative ways to integrate sensory experiences in art and media. In doing so, Test_Lab: Multimodal reveals the obstacles faced, and achievements made, in contemporary aRt&D that aims to enhance the sensorial richness of art and media experiences in (technologically) integrated ways.

Test_Lab: Multimodal will feature the latest achievements in stimulating the senses; such as smelly art, live sensory-substitution, the sound of touching one another, sensory-enhanced film, and very loud visuals.

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Originally posted on ../mediateletipos))) by pablo sanz


Music Man

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Douglas Repetto is a legend in New York City, where he has fostered a thriving electronic music and new media community. He is founder of the Dorkbot discussion series (which now has local branches around the world), the ArtBots Robot Talent Show, and Organism, a collective of people "making art with living systems." By day, he is Director of Research at Columbia University's famous Computer Music Center, and it's unlikely he'll ever be able to live down the glory of being deemed "sexiest geek" by Wired. But all of Repetto's accolades and extracurricular activities unfold from his position as a respected artist whose captivating installations appear deceptively simple, only to convey complex sonic experiences. Next week, the UB Art Gallery, in Buffalo, NY, will unveil two new installations by Repetto which "revel in madcap interactivity and DIY technologies." The first, action at a distance (2008) picks up and runs with Repetto's knack for making the ramshackle poetic. With materials that include "a bewitching tangle of motors and pulleys, zigzags of rope, an otter theater, jangling bells, fireflies, switches, breath activators, and rough steel," the pieces ensnare visitors as actors--or perhaps reverse, wireless marionettes--their gestures triggering amplified sounds and the movements of the ropes and motors. everything, all at once (2008) is similarly immersive, with hundreds of mirrors, motors, bells, and lights pulsing in response to the enveloped visitor. Repetto's work is a great example of how masters of the classical arts of music composition and sculpture are using new media to push their work into an interactive realm. - Marisa Olson

Image credit: Douglas Repetto, "puff bang reverb," (2005), photo courtesy David LaSpina

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A Thousand Knights; No Respawn (2008) by Ilia Ovechkin

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New work by Ilia Ovechkin entitled A Thousand Knights; No Respawn. Created using the Sauerbraten game engine, the piece features seemingly hundreds of knights repeatedly colliding into each other. "Respawn" is a gaming term referring to the resuscitation of a character after its death. The rapid movement and shapes in the video seem entirely removed from the gaming environment from which they originate, thus operating outside a virtual creation or death, or any sort of scenario. - Ceci Moss

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Review of "In The Private Eye" at ISE Cultural Foundation

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The mystery genre is one of the most robust in literature, theater and film as it has a superior ability to involve the reader in the unfolding of drama. The group show "In the Private Eye," currently on view at the ISE Cultural Foundation in New York City, reflects this same level of engagement by inviting the viewer to join with six artists in the investigation of a series of crimes, cover-ups, and historical narratives.

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go

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"Go" from Supercentral. Each audio file contains a collection of separate speakers individually reading "Arthur the Rat". The story was originally created by phoneticians to study and compare regional pronunciations of spoken English. If played simultaneously, the 30 sound files contained in "Go" render "Arthur the Rat" nonsensical. I was unable to ReBlog the piece without compromising its shape, click the above image to hear and see "Go". - Ceci Moss

Originally posted on supercentral by Rhizome


Call for Submissions: Dislocate 08 - art, technology, locality - Japan

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Dislocate 08
International Festival for Art, Technology and Locality
September 2008 Tokyo/Yokohama, Japan
Call for Submissions
Deadline: 14th April
www.dis-locate.net

Dislocate questions our notions of place and location in the face of perpetual motion through multifaceted environments. The velocity of this passage is accelerated through new technologies, but as a result how does this impact upon our encounter with place and our attempt to communicate this to elsewhere? Through an exhibition, symposium and workshop series Dislocate will examine this encounter and communication, taking a journey through surrounding spaces and exploring our transient connections.

Propelled through so many spaces with such momentum, mobility brings freedoms but also responsibilities. While in this state of passage how do we decide which spaces to engage with and what is our dialogue with them?

Considering the locations we constantly carry with us, the interaction between the internal/external, virtual/physical, real/imaginary, our locatedness is multiple, fragmentary and in constant flux. Nomadic in structure the festival will focus upon our kinetic force through these various intersecting sites. Employing transitions by foot, bike and public transportation Dislocate will form an expedition into the diverse routes of the city and its hidden spaces, while questioning our relation to the ground beneath our feet.

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Cinema of the Future

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Ongoing in Amsterdam, through February 24th, is the twelfth annual Sonic Acts conference and festival. This year's focus is on The Cinematic Experience and the framers of the symposium have an interesting take on the nature of this experience. They argue that cinema preceded celluloid (with the magic lantern, zoetrope, etc) and that it now supercedes it--not only with video, but also with higher resolutions, faster distribution networks, and ever more portable recording devices. They ask what the future of the cinematic experience will be, and to reflect on this question, they offer a series of performances, talks, and exhibitions, the highlight of which is a show at Netherlands Media Art Institute featuring the work of Julien Maire (F), Ulf Langheinrich (D), Boris Debackere (BE) and Kurt Hentschl�ger (AT). Ultimately, this merging of sound and cinema is a provocative one, as it casts into speculation the relationship of our senses to these evolvingly more "virtual" media. If a trip to Amsterdam isn't in your immediate future, check out the festivals live feeds, online. - Marisa Olson

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Art Games: Digital artists are using game technologies to create bold new works

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by Christiane Paul

Digital art takes many forms: installations; Internet art; virtual-reality projects that use devices such as headsets and data gloves to immerse participants in a virtual world; software coded by the artist; or even "locative media" art that uses mobile devices (such as cell phones) to turn public spaces like buildings or parks into a canvas.

Digital photographs, films, and videos have been common in the arts since the 1990s; even paintings and sculptures are now sometimes produced with the aid of digital tools. But projects that use digital technologies as a medium in themselves--and that, like their medium, are interactive, collaborative, customizable, and variable--still occupy the margins of art institutions and find their audience mostly at new-media art festivals or on the Internet.

A few artists use digital technologies as a medium for reconfiguring more traditional forms such as paintings, photographs, or videos. Among them are Brody Condon, John Gerrard, and Alex ­Galloway and the Radical Software Group (RSG). All use the technologies of game development to investigate the status of traditional media in the digital age. Their works consider how the digital medium has changed the nature of representation, erasing the boundaries between established categories such as painting, photography, cinema, and sculpture.

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From Technology Review, this article provides an excellent overview of a selection of artists using gaming technologies in their work. Christiane Paul, currently Adjunct Curator of New Media Arts at the Whitney, connects their practices to the traditional mediums of painting, photography, and video.

Originally posted on Technology Review Feed - Tech Review Top Stories by Rhizome