Posts for February 2008

TranShift08

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TranShift is a time-based new media art festival. This juried two-day festival will occur on May 2-3 at several venues in downtown Knoxville, Tennessee. The first-of-its-kind in Knoxville, this event will involve galleries and public spaces. The viewers' experience will be framed by their transit from one piece to another - through downtown.

This call is open to artists working in time-based new media; which includes but is not limited to video art, animation, and sound art. The deadline for entries is April 1, 2008. For more information and submission instructions, visit our website at http://www.knoxvillearts.org/transhift08

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Dress Codes

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In just a few days, some of the art world's most prominent scholars will descend upon Dallas, Texas for the annual conference of the College Art Association. Each year there are a number of intriguing exhibitions on in conjunction with the symposium, and the Leonardo Education Forum-sponsored exhibition, Social Fabrics, looks like a must-see. Curated by Susan E. Ryan and Patrick Lichty, the show's subtitle is "Wearable + Media + Interconnectivity" and the selected works demonstrate "convergences between individual expression and statement making, on the one hand, and the phenomenology of 'network society' on the other." If that sounds a bit brainy to you, consider that the exhibition is a tricked-out fashion show in which artists combine wearable art, locative media, sensor technology, and social commentary on life in a high tech society. As the curators point out, "Fashion and digital technology have been interdependent at least since the development of Jacquard's loom in the 1800's." But now digital code and dress codes have merged, allowing artists and their muses to express themselves in provocative new ways. - Marisa Olson

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Luxe Gallery: Pia Lindman, Faceworks -- Thursday, February 14, 6 - 8PM

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Luxe Gallery

53 Stanton Street,
East Village / Lower East Side
Web Site


Pia Lindman

Pia Lindman's performance-based work suggests new ways of combining research and art. As Fellow and artist-in-residence at M.I.T.(2004-06) she studied humanoid robots and facial expressions (both robotic and human). In FACEWORKS, Lindman exhibits a selection of the resulting pieces, such as Fascia, her acclaimed video and performance installation that was exhibited at the Store Front for Art and Architecture Gallery in New York in 2006.

For Fascia, Lindman designed a chair, echoing the devices used in early photographic portraiture. Metal contraptions extend from the headrest of the chair to hold her head in place as she sits. In various shots, the contraptions attach to her head and face at different points, forcing her face to conform to increasingly difficult, uncomfortable positions.

These one-hour performances are recorded and edited as a series of time-lapsed (layered) videos focusing on her face. Because of the duration of the pose, the face generates minute movements that do not emphasize individuality of the face's features but cause it to lose any sense of intentional expression. The face is rendered empty and open to interaction and dialog. At the same time, it also appears immobile - a grimace, a mask.

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Originally posted on ArtCal Openings by Rhizome


subdivisions of the forest line

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"subdivisions of the forest line" from out-4-pizza

Originally posted on out_4_pizza by Rhizome


Tone Poem (2005) by Marc Kremers

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Infinite, randomly generated song, based on glitches from a bad taping of Rodox Video Programme 358 by Color Climax Corp.

Tone Poem is a web-based work by London-based digital artist and animator Marc Kremers. This piece, which presents a peach-colored screen periodically intercepted by flashes of colored light and a minimalist score, is derived from a pornographic video tape. The final product totally obscures the original source material, rendering it invisible. Kremers, along with Thomas Eberwein, also launched the website As-Found which culls random images from the web. As-Found proposes to, "...choose images for different qualities than those which were intended to be seen. Therefore the creator is often irrelevant." Tone Poem similarly reframes and redirects visual imagery toward a new configuration, away from the intent of its initial creator. - Ceci Moss

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Tom Moody's OptiDisc at Art Fag City

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Tom Moody, OptiDisc, animated GIF.

Art blog Art Fag City have a fantastic new masthead designed by artist and blogger Tom Moody, pictured above. See below for a description of the work from Art Fag City:

"The piece is meant to be big, dumb, and iconic, a moving, pulsing symbol of both the promise and failure of technology," said Tom Moody of Optidisc during Geeks in the Gallery, a detail of which now resides in my masthead. Aesthetically the gif looks just as Moody describes it, the rings klutzy yet mildly hypnotic; though past this, its life as a meme underscores the artist's excitement and reservations about the web as a medium. Referencing artists such as Kenneth Noland and Jasper Johns, without reiterating color field painting or Minimalism, Optidisc speaks as clearly to a tradition of Fine Art painting, as it does regular surfers looking for something "different" for their myspace page.

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Open Call: e-MobiLArt: European Mobile Lab for Interactive Artists

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e-MobiLArt: European Mobile Lab for Interactive Artists
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Call for artists and scientists

European Mobile Lab for Interactive Media Artists (e-MobiLArt) is a project tailored around the process of creating collaborative interactive installation artworks. Such interactive mediated environments may involve the use of multimodal interfaces, ubiquitous computing and mobile or locative media technologies.

The e-MobiLArt project aims to provide selected participants with an ideal context, that will allow them to travel, collaborate and exhibit their work.

During this project, artists and scientists who are active in creating interactive media art or pursuing innovative interdisciplinary research will have the opportunity to:

- create interactive installation artworks
- collaborate with other artists and scientists from different countries
- get technical support and tuition from experts on using innovative technologies for creating interactive art
- meet, discuss and collaborate with curators and museum organizers
- exhibit their work in at least two different European countries
- document their work in a special issue of Leonardo Electronic Almanac and the exhibition catalogue
- participate in an international network of artists, researchers, academics and theorists

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


hypercube

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Originally posted on Loshadka by billy


House Music

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Artist Oliver Laric is a master of the mash-up. His 787 Cliparts (2006) video displayed a virtuosic knack for bringing new form to sampled material, and his 50/50 (2007) (which is included in the Rhizome-curated New Museum exhibition Montage: Unmonumental Online) brought a new sense of harmony to fifty found videos of YouTube users singing along to the music of rapper 50 Cent. His newest project bears the demonstrative title, Songs Translated to Buildings and once again merges two simple concepts (the playlist and creative outsourcing) to produce a work of deeper import. In this case, Laric sent three popular songs about houses to an unnamed "architecture firm in Chennai/India," where workers interpreted the lyrics and created corresponding 3d models. The project's website displays the illustrations, alongside MP3 files for "House Where Nobody Lives" by Tom Waits (1999); "Our House" by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young (1970); and "House With No Door" by Van Der Graaf Generator (1970), respectively. The gesture of calling this process a translation highlights the cross-cultural exchange that took place in these transactions, while also inviting the viewer to consider the word/image relationships brokered in each of the songs. The highly-detailed, appropriately subjective models are ultimately as emotive as the tunes that inspired them and one only wishes Laric will expand his playlist, in the future. - Marisa Olson

Image: Oliver Laric, Songs Translated to Buildings, 2008

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The Junk Set

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Move over, ink jet, it's time for Junk Jet! If you think the era of DIY zines has withered in an age of electronic reproduction, think again. Junk Jet is an online fanzine and lo-fi print publication concerned with "tinkering (bricoler, basteln), with forms and found objects, with theories and (small) narratives, with fashions and styles, and of course with computers and other electronic devices." The point of the collaborative project is to discuss the status of piracy and potentials for subversion in the era of digital media. With contributions by the likes of Amy Alexander, Kim Cascone, Jaromil, and Olia Lialina, readers can expect fun, politically-engaged, visually and aurally stimulating content with which Junk Jet lives up to its promise to distort the digital hype and collapse the technological seduction. - Marisa Olson

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