Posts for April 2008

After McLuhan (2008) by Peter Baldes

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After McLuhan: 84 scanned images of Marshall McLuhan's The Medium is the Massage, 1966 by Peter Baldes

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Originally posted on del.icio.us/marisaolson by marisaolson


Star Search

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So-called casual games--the small-format, web-accessible time-killers that form the bulk of the indie games movement--typically focus on two related, goal-based activities: solving puzzles and reacting to stimuli. Rod Humble's Stars Over Half Moon Bay takes both factors and slows them down, eschewing a conventional win/lose structure in favor of a more open-ended opportunity for contemplation and creative play. In the game's three phases, the player first uses her cursor to tag nighttime stars, which transform into squares as the sky recedes, and finally become stars again when the deep-blue sky returns, whereupon she can connect them as constellations. Humble (who works by day at megacompany Electronic Arts heading their Sims Studio) writes that Stars is about "the relationship between observation, symbolism, exactitude and the creative process." Reviewing the game, fellow experimental game designer Jason Rohrer agrees, calling it a "meta-constellation of its own" that offers a metaphor for the creative process, "bringing disparate components together and adjusting them to work in harmony." Unlike Tale of Tales' richly detailed The Graveyard, Stars functions with a visually minimalist, 2D design (merely sky, land, stars, squares and lines), but both attempt to orchestrate a more art-like, meditative experience by evoking a quiet tranquility in which simple gameplay gestures become heavy with potential significance. - Ed Halter

Image Credit: Rod Humble, Stars Over Half Moon Bay (still), 2007

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bitforms gallery: Lynn Hershman Leeson, Found Objects -- Thursday, April 24, 6:30 - 8:30PM

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bitforms gallery

529 West 20th Street, 2nd Floor,
Chelsea



Including the premiere of the sex doll installation, "Olympia: Fictive Projections and the Myth of the Real Woman," a provocative and updated version of Edouard Manet's notorious painting,"Olympia."

San Francisco-based artist and filmmaker Lynn Hershman Leeson returns to bitforms gallery in New York for a new solo exhibition, Found Objects, running April 24-May 31. With a body of work that spans over 35 years and ranges from early conceptual and performance pieces to artificial intelligence robotic works and films, Hershman Leeson is one of the most influential artists working in new media today. Updating the notion of "readymade" introduced by Marcel Duchamp, Found Objects is a new series that features assembly-line produced female sex dolls to examine contemporary issues of projected fantasies and the mythology of artificial women. With the installation, "Olympia: Fictive Projections and the Myth of the Real Woman," Hershman Leeson restages Edouard Manet's "Olympia," projecting images of the painting on a doll to offer a provocative, updated version of the notorious artwork. Also on display are several digital prints in which the dolls appear to be emotionally involved in their predestined situations.

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Originally posted on ArtCal Openings by Rhizome


Sousveillance Culture Conference

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SOUSVEILLANCE CULTURE CONFERENCE
Saturday, April 26, 2008
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Presentations on the theory & practice of surveillance and contemporary protest art, by graduate students in the ITP program at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts.

The presenters' talks will be grouped into four panels, to be moderated by their Professor, Marisa Olson (Curator at Large, Rhizome), on topics ranging from voyeurism and play to intervention and networks of control. These panels will consist of both artist talks and critical essays, and audience members will be invited to give feedback on a few works in progress.

Venue: The Change You Want to See Gallery
84 Havemeyer @ Metropolitan, Brooklyn, NY 11211
L to Bedford or Lorimer, G to Metropolitan, J/M/Z to Marcy
http://www.thechangeyouwanttosee.org

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


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"Ping Geography" by Cristobal Mendoza translates the current network ping times into geographical distances.

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


Futures of the Internet

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Last week, the Internet Society hosted a panel entitled Futures of the Internet, with academic and consultant Clay Shirky, whose recent book Here Comes Everybody looks at collaboration online; Columbia University law professor Tim Wu, co-founder of the Berkman Center at Harvard and Oxford law professor Jonathan Zittrain, also the author of the aptly titled book the Future of the Internet-- and How to Stop It, and Rhizome's own Lauren Cornell. As the designated art advocate, Cornell speculated on the future of online art. Notes from this talk will be posted here later this week but for now, we suggest you read the summary over on Art Fag City.

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Identity Art: Alive and Flickr'ing

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Identity art long predates electronic art. Even among the avant garde, artists were using their work to sort out their personae long before we plugged-in machines to perform our computations. In many ways, this genre hit its heyday in the 1970s, after the emergence of video, and coasted through the '80s and '90s only to take on a stale whiff in the '00s, particularly after 9/11 and the Iraq War upped the ante for artists to look beyond themselves as subjects. So, if nothing else, it is incredibly bold for this year's EMAF (Electronic Media Arts Festival) to take up "Identity" as its theme. Running April 23-27 in Osnabrueck, Germany, the fest will present the work of a wide range of artists in over 300 installations, films, and videos, host two conferences, and act as a platform for a range of student projects by people apparently just learning about identity. All jesting aside, the festival's organizers have succeeded in arguing that a category of artistic practice previously kicked to the academic recycling bin is still alive and operating under new conditions. Afterall, it's no longer just Bruce Nauman and Cindy Sherman pointing cameras at themselves, but every person who maintains an account with social networking sites like Facebook and MySpace. And, of course, the question of digital reality (even digital indexicality) has taken well-cooked debates about the documentary status of reality TV and similar forms to a new level, when aimed at Second Life and machinima. In a statement signed by "The Festival Team," prospective attendees are asked, "How do digital technologies change all areas of private and public life?" Ralf Bendrath's lecture on "Digital Identity" will respond to this weighty inquiry by investigating "the forms and consequences of the increasing capture of private data ...

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Wearable Computers: Spatiality, Sensorial Experience and Mediation

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Join us at Upgrade! Sao Paulo, next Saturday (april/26/2008) with Luisa Paraguai Donati.

M a r t h a
martha carrer cruz gabriel
curator
Upgrade! Sao Paul

WEARABLE COMPUTERS: SPATIALITY, SENSORY EXPERIENCE, MEDIATION

Luisa Paraguai Donati's present research reflects about mobile technologies and several objects/gadgets, particularly the wearable systems, that explore other orders/configurations of the body in the space, as they introduce a digital context that overlaps/creates the physical domain and that bring not only social consequences but also other spatial and temporal dynamics of perception and action. In order to contextualize this research, it will be presented project of several artists and personal experiences that discuss the understanding of body-space as a process cultural and technologically elaborated.

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


What a Bunch of Rookies!

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Pioneering internet artist Olia Lialina has written about the fact that most of the web's sites and contents are built by amateurs--those people who put the "user" in "user generated" or who, before the days of web 2.0, took it upon themselves to create what Cory Arcangel calls "dirt style" websites that seem to holler, "Welcome to my homepage!" But as curator Ralph Rugoff points out, "an aesthetic of amateurism has long served as a means for deflating models of academic and market-driven art," harkening back to "conceptual artists and earlier... modernist vanguards." This week, San Francisco's CCA Wattis Institute will open Rugoff's group exhibition, "Amateurs." Up through August 9th, the show includes a long list (Johanna Billing, Jennifer Bornstein, Andrea Bowers, Phil Collins, Jeremy Deller, Harrell Fletcher, Josh Greene, Cameron Jamie, Alan Kane, Long March Project, Yoshua Okon, Michele O'Marah, Hirsch Perlman, Jim Shaw, Simon Starling, Javier Téllez, Jeffrey Vallance, and Eric Wesley) of artists "embracing amateurism as a means for questioning basic assumptions about authorship, expertise, the relationship between artist and audience, and the contingency of cultural values." Formerly director of the Wattis Institute (which has close ties to CCA's curatorial practice program) and currently director of London's Hayward Gallery, Rugoff is known for writing articles and organizing exhibits that comment heavily on the nature of contemporary art practice, and his statement for this show raises questions about the increasingly professionalized nature of the art world, and the resulting assignment of, or prohibition upon, authority. In this case, the artists present work that tends to follow two tracks--either inserting themselves into a position as an amateur (i.e. amateur anthropologists) or inserting themselves into amateurish subcultures, from DIY craft groups to amateur film clubs. The hope is that both types ...

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Originally posted on the lion king by cab