Posts for April 2008

the shifting of planets and you

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Originally posted on out_4_pizza by Rhizome


(love + hate) x 100

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MTAA's most recent piece (LOVE + HATE) x 100 on display at Amarcord as part of ARTWALKING, a project in which over thirty local artists installed work in storefronts located on the Bedford Avenue strip in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (LOVE + HATE) x 100 may also be viewed online.

Originally posted on Photos from m. river by Rhizome


kamau.org

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The website of Bay Area-based video and performance artist Kamau Amu Patton, whose work uses and often reassembles traditional African imagery and costume in order to explore the formation of modern mythology, African-American identity, and popular culture, is a new video in which one of Patton's characters ignites fireworks illuminating an alter-like pattern to the accompaniment of bells and a low frequency buzz. - Ceci Moss

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Marie Sester's "Exposure" at gallery@calit2

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Media artist Marie Sester's work Exposure (2001), on view at U.C. San Diego's gallery@calit2 until June 6th, encourages a closer examination of pre-9/11 surveillance technology. The multi-channel video installation gathers and superimposes x-rayed images of vehicles and, in one sequence, a house. Exposure came out of the artist's interest in the aesthetics of x-ray and laser technology, and it was initially exhibited at the San Jose Museum of Art in the Fall 2001 as part of the "Blind Vision: Video and Limits of Perception." The show at gallery@calit2 is accompanied by a lengthy interview with Sester by Eduardo Navas, in which she discusses her thoughts on the emergence of the concept of surveillance as a tool specific to the "war against terror" and the weight of this shift given the continued extension of surveillance since the early 2000s. Those unable to visit San Diego for the exhibition may view the three channel installation via the gallery's webcam. - Ceci Moss

Marie Sester, Exposure, 2001

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Pretty on the Inside

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In Laura Splan's mixed-media practice, the human body functions as both a physiological and cultural site: a conjunction of blood, bones, viruses and viscera masked by successive layers of social display, including clothing and makeup. To Splan, these accoutrements are means of hiding our bodies (as opposed to adorning them) and therefore serve as symptoms of a broader social discomfort with the unpleasant realities of human biology. Splan's work endeavors to expose this condition by interweaving the carnal and decorative spheres, as in Trousseau (Negligee #1) (2007), a negligee made from cosmetic facial masks and machine-embroidered with various botanical and ornamental decorative motifs. After use, these masks can preserve intricate details of human hair and flesh-- a material property Splan exploits by mapping the entirety of her body with the masks that comprise Trousseau. The negligee's intended but absent body -- already implied by its presentation on a black dress form -- is thus reiterated by the carnal traces recorded on the very fabric of the piece. An even more unnerving work, Blood Scarf (2002) consists of knitted, clear vinyl tubing attached to an intravenous device, such that the wearer of the piece contributes to its materiality by supplying it with his or her own blood. In this, Splan moves into even more extreme territory than Rebecca Horn, whose performance/sculptures like Overflowing Blood Machine (1970) included human bodies wrapped in blood-filled tubes, which weren't actually connected to the performers. Blood Scarf fascinates not simply for its uncanny construction, but because of the paradox at the center of its relationship to its wearer: that it fulfills the scarf's function to warm and preserve the human body through a process that simultaneously debilitates a given wearer. -- Tyler Coburn

Image Credit: Laura Splan, Blood Scarf, 2002

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Request for Qualifications: Situated Technologies: Toward the Sentient City

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The Architectural League of New York announced a request for qualifications today for their Spring 2009 exhibition Situated Technologies: Toward the Sentient City. Details below.


Situated Technologies: Toward the Sentient City
An exhibition critically exploring the evolving relationship between ubiquitous/pervasive computing and urban architecture


SUBMISSION DEADLINE: June 27, 2008


The Architectural League of New York invites architects, artists, designers, technologists,engineers, urbanists, or teams thereof, to submit qualifications for an exhibition that will critically explore the evolving relationship between ubiquitous/pervasive computing and urban architecture. The League will commission five to seven teams to develop urban interventions-to be installed in and around New York City in spring 2009-that will imagine alternative trajectories for how various mobile, embedded, networked, and distributed forms of media, information and communication systems might inform the architecture of urban space and/or influence our behavior within it. Commissioned projects will receive support ranging from $5,000 to $25,000.


The exhibition continues the League's commitment to supporting original research into the implications of ubiquitous/pervasive computing for architecture and urbanism. In fall 2006, the League, along with the Center for Virtual Architecture and the Institute for Distributed Creativity [iDC], presented "Architecture and Situated Technologies," a 3-day symposium organized by Omar Khan, Trebor Scholz, and Mark Shepard, that brought together researchers and practitioners from art, architecture, technology and sociology to explore the emerging role of Situated Technologies in the design and inhabitation of the contemporary city. The project continued in winter 2007 with the publication "Urban Computing and Its Discontents," the first of nine pamphlets to be published over the next three years that explores how our experience of the city and the choices we make in it are affected by mobile communications, pervasive media, ambient informatics and other Situated Technologies.


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Like an Art Party Where Everyone's Invited

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For all that's been said about how behind-the-times academia can be, university galleries are very often the most risk-taking portholes to contemporary art. This fact is exemplified by Arizona State University's Art Museum where curator John Spiak has demonstrated a keen eye and clear commitment to emerging artists and emergent media. The museum's new Social Studies series turns the gallery over to a visiting artist to use it as their lab and concoct an exhibition composed largely of art work in the form of social interaction. The program's second resident, San Francisco Bay Area artist Josh Greene, is already well-known for such work. He's turned a surprise party for his sister into a public event, organized luncheons for gallery workers, and even managed to seduce Sophie Calle into lending him her bed to lie in as a means of sleeping-off a breakup. Greene is the founder of the Bay Area Leisure Foundation, which hands out giant $500 checks to winning applicants who submit "leisure proposals" which are judged by "leisure experts." Among his best-known projects is Service Works, a monthly grant program in which the artist donates his waitstaff tips (an unpredictable number, thus merging situationism and the legacy of "chance operations," depending on how you look at it) to another artist, based again on the merit of their project proposals. The winners have all embraced fun while, in a roundabout way, using wealthy diners' money to do something positive for the world. For his ASU residency, the artist completed a series of tasks under the banner of the disclaimer "Some Parts Might Be Greater Than the Whole." These include chatting with a chimp about art ideas, installing a show of the museum preparators' artwork, acting in other artists' videos, a "public restroom intervention" entitled ...

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Will Not Cry in Public

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A media art exhibition
By Olan Netrangsi, Pathompon Tesprateep, and Sathit Sattarasart
April 17-May 17, 2008
at 7th Floor, Main Library,
Chulalongkorn University

Yield is a group of young artists from Bangkok, consisting of Olan Netrangsi, Pathompon Tesprateep, and Sathit Sattarasart. They all graduated from Chulalongkorn University's Faculty of Fine Arts and Applied Art. Born in the 1970s and possessing a shared interest in independent film, alternative music and culture, Yield is an actively involved group of young independent film and video makers based in Bangkok.

This exhibition focuses on public and private issues, control / yield, and fiction / reality. This young generation of artists express their individual concerns on different levels and take new positions on social structure and media propaganda.
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Originally posted on bangkok-ok! by Rhizome