Posts for April 2008

Bent Festival NYC

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The Bent Festival is an annual art and music festival celebrating DIY electronics, hardware hacking, and circuit bending. Each year we invite artists from across the country and around the globe to perform music with their home-made or circuit bent instruments, teach workshops to adults and children alike, create beautiful art installations and to generally come together, face to face, and showcase the state of the art in DIY electronics and circuit bending culture.

Runs Thursday April 24th to Saturday April 26th.

Tickets
Each concert is $10.
A Festival Pass to all events is available for $25.

Location
DCTV
87 Lafayette St (map)
New York, NY, 10013

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With installations, performances, and workshops- the organizers of Bent Festival NYC have, again, put together another fantastic line up. For this weekend's full schedule, click here.

Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Open Call: minutopia: new actualities for a new world

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minutopia: new actualities for a new world
Call for new 1-minute silent documentaries of your region.
Postmark Deadline: May 31, 2008
http://silversunscreen.blogspot.com/

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COCA Center for Outdoor Contemporary Art presents

minutopia: new actualities for a new world

project summary
"minutopia: new actualities for a new world" celebrates the magic and mystery of our viewable world through new artist-made documentaries that creatively explore in minutiae the familiar marvels of our contemporary age. Extending the rich legacy of cinema's earliest documentary achievements, these new "actualities" offer vivid examples of the hidden poetry and lyricism found in our waking life. Crowds, street-scenes, animals, tasks, transportation, nature, art and architecture - plus curious oddities and events all unfold to offer unexpected insight or passing fancy to audiences of all ages.

more details and guidelines

www.cocanow.org

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Wanderlust Wunderkins

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The Center for Land Use Interpretation (CLUI) is a very interesting and prolific nonprofit organization "dedicated to the increase and diffusion of knowledge about how the nation's lands are apportioned, utilized and perceived." At times they work like an artist collective, exhibiting research-based work, while at other times they are residency providers, educators, and an informational clearinghouse. Their programs have been based largely in Los Angeles, as well as their recently opened center in Houston, but they've also managed to examine the "lay of the land" in regions countrywide. In fact, this is the title of their quarterly publication, of which the Spring 2008 issue was just released. Copies are available online (though a small donation gets you a print copy and goes a long way in supporting CLUI's work), and each issue is jam-packed with fascinating info on the issues around which CLUI's work revolves. There is a clear concern for the health of the environment and communities in each of their projects, which include educational tours of overlooked spaces, scientific field research, and copious photo documentation of the often surreal effects of transportation lust, pollution, and other societal "advances" upon the national landscape. Highlights in the current issue of Lay of the Land include a study of the American parking space, a discussion of garbage with filmmaker Heather Rogers, numerous field trip reports, an analysis of the hovercraft, and insights on Minneapolis--which just might prove helpful for anyone interested in this Republican National Host City's relationship to change, political or geographic. Of course, CLUI's maps indicate that there's always an overlap in the two. - Marisa Olson

Image Credit: CLUI photo

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Dam, Stuhltrager Gallery: Ryan Wolfe

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Dam, Stuhltrager Gallery
38 Marcy Avenue
Williamsburg / Greenpoint / Bushwick
April 25 - May 31, 2008

Opening: Friday, April 25, 7 - 9PM

Ryan Wolfe

"Does the flap of a butterfly's wings in Brazil set off a tornado in Texas?" - Edward Lorenz

An installation inspired by the theories of Edward Lorenz opens one week after his death. This one man's giant impact on contemporary thinking leaves everything after him forever changed.

Branching Systems(butterfly hurricane) Masses of robotic leaves flutter like butterflies, transforming the gallery space into a jungle-like network of complex, serendipitious motion. Individual viewers have an impact on this motion, and their physical interactions with the piece ripple out across the network like wind.

Branching Systems (butterfly hurricane) is an interactive installation exploring Lorenz's famous "butterfly effect" which signalled the beginnings of modern chaos theory. It tangibly reimagines cause and effect wrapped into a single moment, and demonstrates how small variations of the initial condition of a nonlinear dynamic system may produce large variations in the long term behavior of the system.

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Originally posted on ArtCal Picks by Rhizome


A Woman With Sound Ideas

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In the late 1940s, Bebe Barron (née Charlotte May Wind) and her husband Louis opened the first electronic recording studio in the United States, filling their Greenwich Village apartment with cutting-edge equipment, much of it self-created. There, the couple created the first electronic composition recorded to magnetic tape, entitled Heavenly Menagerie, around 1950. Inspired by the writings of Norbert Weiner (who coined the term "cybernetics" in the 1940s), Barrons built unique, hand-soldered circuits for each repeating sound (Bebe said each had "a particular sort of nervous system"); since the circuits had limited but unpredictable life spans, the couple recorded hours of raw loops to tape, then composed through editing. Their studio soon catered to the close-knit world of the downtown avant-garde; they created scores for the experimental films of Shirley Clarke and Ian Hugo (husband of Anaïs Nin, a friend of Bebe's), assisted Teiji Ito with the soundtrack for Maya Deren's The Very Eye of Night, and provided the raw materials for John Cage's first two tape pieces, Imaginary Landscape No. 5 and Williams Mix. The Barrons most famous work was the soundtrack to the canonical atomic-age science fiction film Forbidden Planet (1956)-- the first fully electronic score for a feature film. A dreamlike soup of bubbling, organic bleeps and bloops, the soundtrack generated widespread critical praise, but the musicians' union refused to accept the work, so the couple were credited as creators of "electronic tonalites" rather than music. (Despite the Barron's centrality to the art scene, Cage wasn't too generous either: in his 1961 book Silence he states that the Barrons "are not properly termed avant-garde since they maintain conventions and accepted values.") Bebe Barron, who passed away April 20 at age 82, created her last composition in 2000, perhaps tellingly entitled ...

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Doing It Ourselves

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The spirit of D-I-Y is one widely embraced by activists. Not to bracket the importance of collective social action, the idea of "doing it yourself" conjures a sense of taking responsibility for a scenario, and productively taking matters into one's own hands. For this reason, cookbooks, toolboxes, and user manuals are common formal metaphors in tactical media projects focused on mirroring extant tools and techniques to effect change. A new exhibition at Vancouver's Western Front gallery (whose mission is "promoting the role of the artist in determining the cultural ecology"), entitled "Kits for an Encounter" explores the medium of the the kit. Typically portable, efficient, and therefore easily deployable, these are a hybrid between political first aid kits and situationist magic hats. Each of the nine artists present a different take on the kit, ranging from MacGyveresque problem-solving to the fantastical creation of utopian encounters. Azra Aksamija's Nomadic Mosque comments on both the borders of religious communities, and the portability of spiritual identity. The piece "unfolds from a fashionable women's semi-formal [outfit] into a minimal mosque which the artist-architect spatio-temporally demarcates as a prayer rug for two, head covering, compass, and prayer beads." Judi Werthein's Brinco is a tennis shoe "equipped with a flashlight, compass, [and] painkillers to enable those illegally crossing the US-Mexico border." The sneaky sneakers will be sold at boutiques with profits going towards distribution of the "cross trainers" to border crossers. Vahida Ramujkic's Assimil is a textbook "whose exercises and lesson plans 'teach' non-European Union citizens how to properly enter and assimilate into the EU." Each of these works, and additional projects by Steven Brekelmans, Limor Fried, Max Goldfarb, Janice Kerbel, Lize Mogel, and Noam Toran comment on personal space, skill and empowerment, and the deeper import of seemingly small ...

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JOBS @ ARS ELECTRONICA

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Hi All, The Ars Electronica FutureLab search for new hires is almost certainly the biggest hiring spree in the history of media arts. They've asked me to help with shaping the announcement and spreading the word. -M http://www.naimark.net

JOBS @ ARS ELECTRONICA

Ars Electronica Futurelab is hiring artists and researchers

- artists /software engineers (openGL, C++)
- artists / hardware engineers (sensors and programming)
- artists / modelers (3D, real time graphics)
- technical planners (software and/or hardware and CAD)
- project managers (software, exhibition)
- designers / architects (exhibits and media in architecture)

Ars Electronica Futurelab, the R&D division of Ars Electronica founded in 1996, is an atelier/lab for media art, design, research, and production. Members of the Ars Electronica Futurelab represent a broad variety of different disciplines and nationalities, working in such areas as computer vision, sound analysis, mobile computing, generative graphics, computer controls, and computer networks.

Ars Electronica is embedded in the activities for Linz, Austria. As the European Capital of Culture in 2009, a continuously growing, vital cultural environment is guaranteed both in the city and as the working environment at the lab.

Ars Electronica Futurelab is hiring 12 to 20 new members to be part of the creation team of the new exhibits at the Ars Electronica Center as well as other projects. We are seeking both junior and senior level team members. Partially academic, partially production oriented, experts share their knowledge in workshops we call "LabAcademies," thus we are seeking both experienced teachers and avid students.

Interested persons should prepare to stay for a period of at least 12 months in Linz Austria. There is a possibility for some positions to stay even longer or become permanent. The languages spoken in the Lab are English or German.

Ars Electronica will assist foreigners to obtain work permits for ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Noise! 2008

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May 8, 2008: 10 p.m. - May 11, 2008: 1 a.m.
at Ontological Theater, St. Mark's Church, 131 E. 10th St., Manhattan, NY
http://www.ontological.com/

Streamed live on free103point9 Online Radio. Audio and video at www.free103point9.org

Noise! is a sound performance festival started in 2005. free103point9 curates for the second year. Each year the "Incubator" program at Ontological Theater hosts a Noise! festival, a three-night multi-arts event designed to promote interest in new forms of sound art. The festival will feature short compositions and performances by established and emerging artists. Each evening opens with a Radio 4x4 as the audience enters the theater. Radio 4x4 is a free103point9 collaborative radio transmission performance. Four simultaneous audio performances are separately sent through FM transmitters to radios positioned throughout a performance space. Each radio receives only one of the signals, so that the audience becomes an active collaborator in the performance, "mixing" the audio feeds by moving about the space among the four signals. Other artists will perform each evening. Tianna Kennedy, Tom Roe, and Damian Catera will curate each evening.

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Originally posted on free103point9 Newsroom by Rhizome


Video of Futures of the Internet Panel

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Last week, we said we'd re-post notes from the Futures of the Internet discussion at NYU. In lieu of notes, we are pleased to share full-length video documentation of the panel that was just sent to us. Art was a relatively small part of the larger discussion, but some speculations on its future were made.

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Voice Lessons

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What's in a voice? In these days of texting one's "vote" for their favorite singer on American Idol, the relationship between politics and using one's voice seem to have become estranged. Sure, the ability of siren's songs and golden throats to entertain us has an important cultural position, but the voice has also been used to convey oral histories, to negotiate terms, to speak for those who cannot, and even to lure, summon, and cast spells. Taking place all over New York City, the upcoming Creative Time program "Hey Hey Glossolalia" takes a closer look at (er... listen to?) the voice in a medley of programs as wide as Mariah Carey's vocal range. Interesting highlights include a conversation about truth and language between artist Rigo 23 and Black Panther Party member Robert King Wilkerson, who will discuss the "use of speech under pressure of complete isolation" during his 29 years spent in solitary confinement in Angola Prison. At Brooklyn's Pratt Institute, Chris Evans will orchestrate the first iteration in the United States of his Cop Talk project, in which art students meet with a police recruiter to consider a new career option. Carey Young will present a performance called Speechcraft, a subtle revision on a traditional Toastmasters meeting in which the assembled rhetors are asked to speak before an audience of 250 "about objects that Young finds artistically inspiring" and are subsequently "evaluated by fellow members in a cycle of inspiration, review, and reward." In a concert entitled "The Voice (After Mercedes McCambridge)," artists No Bra (Susanne Oberbeck), Genesis P-Orridge, Rammellzee, and Ian Svenonius will present performances inspired by the actress who dubbed the voice of a demonically-posessed character in the film The Exorcist. The pieces promise to "skirt the boundaries between information-giving and ...

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