Posts for November 2008

e-flux launch Journal

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Over the weekend, forward-thinking contemporary art information distribution service e-flux released the inaugural issue of Journal, a new online publication dedicated to art criticism. The introduction, written by editors Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood, and Anton Vidokle, asks why many "have nearly stopped reading art magazines." The obvious answer is that the web has surpassed print, but the authors here cite "the current climate of disciplinary reconfiguration and geographic dispersal." With Journal, the editors hope to draw on the historical importance of art publications as a forum, and revitalize the practice by translating what was initially a printed object to the web. Issue #0 includes thematic articles and experimental writing by Raqs Media Collective, Omer Fast, Boris Groys, Bilal Khbeiz, Sebastjan Leban, Marjetica Potrc, Irit Rogoff, and Pelin Tan.

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Pathologies (2008) - Joseph Moore

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More work by Joseph Moore

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Interview with Daniel Pianetti and Renato Zulli of FAUND

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Image: FAUND #2, November 2008

FAUND is a magazine comprised of images found on the internet. For their first issue, which debuted last month, Switzerland-based editors Daniel Pianetti and Renato Zülli invited artists Peter Sutherland, Guy Meldem and Constant Dullaart to submit their finds. Their second issue comes out today, with images collected by artists Oliver Laric, Samuel Nyholm, Chris Coy, Sorryimissedyourparty, and Justin Kemp. As a seemingly natural extension to sites such as ffffound, the magazine spotlights the curatorial taste and direction of each individual artist. I asked Daniel Pianetti and Renato Zülli a few questions about their project via email. - Ceci Moss

How did you come up with the idea for FAUND?
We noticed that we were spending more and more time surfing for images on the Internet for pleasure, that's how we discovered sites where people can collect found images (ffffound, flickr, as-found...). We often focus our attention on the person who's finding, we think that you can understand a lot about this person judging by his finds. That's why we decided to create a paper magazine that highlights finders by inviting and spotlighting them as guests. Also, by printing the found images they become more durable.

How did you solicit artists to contribute?
Usually we choose the artists judging by their approach to general appropriation art. We simply ask them to send us any amount of image links, without imposing a specific theme on them. The only rule is that they can't submit images that they've modified. We select the guests after considering the creativity of their finds. Until now, we've had a good response because it's an unusual request.

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Image: FAUND #2, November 2008

Do you plan to continue publication on a monthly basis?
We never intended to ...

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THEINTERNETOVEREXPOSED.COM (2008) - Jan Robert Leegte

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[via TAGallery]

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Adult Contemporary and Continuous Partial Awareness Trailer by Cory Arcangel

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Cory Arcangel made a trailer (above) for his upcoming solo exhibition at Team Gallery in Manhattan, called "Adult Contemporary," as well as his performance "Continuous Partial Awareness" on November 14th at the New Museum as part of Rhizome's ongoing New Silent Series. For the exhibition, Arcangel will explore the limits of technology from the perspective of a "non-expert" -- instead of seeking out tactics which subvert the intended use of technology, the works in the show will use technology exactly as it was designed, albeit "poorly" and "in an uneducated manner." The performance will touch on the experience of "continuous partial awareness" which the artist describes as an "eroded degenerate modern version of multitasking" explaining, "...you know, like, when you have 3 IM windows open, 2 email inboxs dinging away, are txting 5 different people, and also have 5 tabs open on your browser, each with updated content."

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Where Votes Come From

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For those who spent their morning pulling levers, the New York Times took an interesting behind-the-scenes peek yesterday at the storage and transportation of these voting machines, complete with a 360-degree view of New York's Voting Machine Facility. Curious minds who want a more in depth take at the history of voting technology should peruse the online component to the National Museum of American History's 2004 exhibition "Vote: the Machine of Democracy," which is still active.

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CHOOSE WISELY!!!

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POLLING PLACE FINDER

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This is new (2003) - Tino Sehgal

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Tino Sehgal, the artist known for scripting scenarios, performed by actors following a set of instructions, brings the arena of news media into the gallery with This is new. For this piece, museum guards quote headlines from the day's newspapers to visitors, encouraging response or feedback on the part of the visitor.

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I Wanted to See All of the News From Today (2007) - Martin John Callanan

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Artist's statement: Aggregating - daily - the front pages of all printed national newspapers from around the world into one place. (Currently includes 618 titles).


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From Rhizome's Artbase

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Vote For Anything (1994) - Henry Lowengard

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Artist's statement- Vote For Anything is a kind of a social experiment as well as an Internet "game" that was running even before the widespread adoption of the "World Wide Web" HTTP protocol. It originally ran as part of my gopher-based "e-zine" Glum Homebody, on the gopher of ECHO, gopher.echonyc.com (which is no longer available)...As the Web expanded beyond the original confines of CERN, I adapted the underlying program to run as a cgi-bin program on my personal web page at ECHO and also at WFMU.org, where it runs today. A few years ago, I prettied up the color scheme, but it basically runs the same as it always has... It's an interesting art piece that can be hijacked by someone with an axe to grind, simply by writing in people and things they wish to hate or promote. From an early implementation, I've always filtered out HTML in the write-ins, so that no redirection or other spoofing would be possible. By allowing for negative votes, one can actively disapprove of something, which fulfills a real need for voters. No one is restricted from multiple votes for multiple items, which sounds like it should make it easy to jam the election in some way, but in fact, this has never happened. The list of candidates ends up looking a little like lists of search engine search items, but they are a little more intentional. The open ended nature of the list lets incongruous items creep in between more serious entries, if any. In fact, incongruous items tend to take over the list, making a kind of collaborative poem, if there's enough traffic.

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From Rhizome's Artbase

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