Posts for July 2008

Work No. 850

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Photograph: Ray Tang/Rex Features (source)

Tate Britain Duveens Commission
2008: Martin Creed Work No. 850
Tate Britain Duveen Galleries
Tuesday 1 July -- Sunday 16 November 2008

A runner will speed through Tate Britain's dramatic neo-classical sculpture galleries, again and again, running as if their life depended on it, every day for the next four months.

http://www.tate.org.uk/britain/exhibitions/duveenscommission/default.shtm

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Originally posted on Loreto Martin by Rhizome


Image Search

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To say that the internet is teeming with data or overflowing with information would be both an understatement and an almost unquantifiable fact, given the ever-shifting shape of the net. But even if the web's state of being is hard to pin down, artist Richard Wright is intrigued by the concrete ways it has contributed to the evolution of communication. In his upcoming exhibition, "How to Talk to Images," at London's HTTP Gallery, the artist presents new work resulting from his residency with HTTP founders Furtherfield.org that continues his exploration into the pictorial history of language. An established film and video artist, as well as a pedigreed new media practitioner and theorist, Wright's show makes a statement about the way that we use images to speak and our new habits of "searching" for, rather than truly seeing visual images. He's created a database of 50,000 random internet images in order to create two works that play with the communicative structure and users' expectations with regard to online searches. The Internet Speaks forces users to skip through the files one at a time, letting the material's statements come to the viewer, rather than allowing them to impose meaning. Meanwhile, The Mimeticon uses the same database but requires viewers to find images not by searching for keywords but by browsing by visual similarities. The latter is positioned as a Baroque search engine, invoking a time of decadent formal experimentation and mechanical development. The show runs July 4th-August 3rd and coincides with the release of a monograph on the artist's work as well as a poster featuring an essay by Wright, illustrated with typefaces marking the evolution of the western alphabet. While his thesis on searching versus seeing implies a new short-term memory on the ...

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460

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PLAY AT THE SAME TIME O -- K

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Originally posted on Petra by Rhizome


Going Public

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"Private fears and shared desires" take the public stage for "Tarantula," a month-long film and video program projected on Europe's biggest LED wall, in Piazza del Duomo, Milan. In collaboration with MIA (Milano In Alto) and Fondazione Nicola Trussardi, which is dedicated to finding "new channels and strategies to distribute contemporary art in the city of Milan," curator Massimiliano Gioni has invited fifteen contemporary artists to screen works twice a day on a screen normally reserved for commercial advertising. Certain works build upon this strategy of intervention, like Pipilotti Rist's series of sixteen one-minute video segments, Open My Glade, originally commissioned by the Public Art Fund, in 2000, to air on the NBC Astrovision by Panasonic video screen in Times Square, New York. Other notables include the film component of Johanna Billing's You Don't Love Me Yet project, documenting the studio recording of Roky Erickson's eponymous 80s pop hit by more than twenty singers; Fiorucci Made Me Hardcore (1999), Mark Leckey's nostalgic chronicle of cross-sections of British dance culture from the 70s and 80s; and Dictio pii(2001), a parade of high-fashion outfits repurposed, by artist Marcus Schinwald, as disturbing fetish-objects. Like the Bob Dylan novel from which it takes its title, "Tarantula" presents rituals public and private, compulsive and fanciful, to show the ways "new rules and behaviors can transform life into a joyful carnival of exceptions." - Tyler Coburn


Image: Mark Leckey, Fiorucci Made Me Hardcore, 1999

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Kari Altmann

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Work from digital artist Kari Altmann. More:

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Originally posted on Delicious Ghost by Cliff Kuang


Headed for the Hills

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Why are new media artists so cool? Because they get to play with toys like spectroheliostats. What's a spectroheliostat? Google won't say, but it's probably some color spectrum device related to the heliostat, which uses a giant mirror to track the motion of the sun. Talk about painting with light... On July 5th, this device will be used in Solar Hills, a collaborative installation by British artist Liliane Lijn and Berkeley-based astrophysicist John Vallerga. Stationing themselves in the Marin Headlands' Hawk Peak, they'll follow the sun and create a light show viewable from San Francisco's Crissy Field, initiating a sunkissed marriage between earth works and lambent performance. And what better place to carry out this experiment than in California's Bay Area, an historic epicenter for digital media, environmental research, and beach activities like this one. The project is supported by the DMAX new media program at the Berkeley Art Museum/ Pacific Film Archive. More information, including up-to-the-minute weather-related updates, can be found on the program's blog. - Marisa Olson

Image: Solar Hills, Liliane Lijn in collaboration with John Vallerga, Jason McPhate and Patrick Jelinksy. Photo credit: Liliane Lijn, Richard Wilding

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TODAY - Mobile Application

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TODAY is a piece of generative design for mobile phones.

It's an application that visualizes personal mobile communication. It sits on the periphery of the machine, monitoring our connectivity through the number and type of calls we receive, subtly displaying them back to us, in the form of a generative graphic. Here, the visual result is a figurative and seemingly abstract picture -- the story of your day. Some days will be really colorful and wired, others quieter and more reflective, either way the resulting visuals will always be personal, unrepeatable and unique.

What lies at TODAY's core was the idea of using personal data as the basis for an aesthetic system, while providing individuals with a visual diary of their communication patterns.

It's an intimate piece that "lives" in your pocket.

It's freely distributed for Symbian phones at http://today.cada1.net

Credits:
A Project by CADA -- www.cada1.net
Idea and Design: Sofia Oliveira/Jared Hawkey
Symbian Programming: Heitor Ferreira
Site Developer: Damian Stewart

Second phase of development funded by: DGArtes, Ministerio Cultura, Portugal

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


André Avelãs: Untitled / Performance / Kunsthalle Basel, Switzerland

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In the context of the group show "Word Event"; at Kunsthalle Basel, artist André Avelãs installed his sound-installation "Untitled (Kunsthalle Basel)" consisting of used loudspeakers, amplifiers, record players and mixing consoles. The installation has been set up in different venues already, the first time in 2005 -- "Untitled (Rietveld)" -- and since then always changes a little bit. This video documents AAndré Avelãs performance on the occasion of the opening of the exhibition "Word Event" at Kunsthalle Basel. André Avelãs(born 1976 in Caldas da Raihna, Portugal, lives and works in Amsterdam) is part of DNK Amsterdam, a concert series for new live electronic and acoustic music. Kunsthalle Basel, June 28, 2008.
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Originally posted on VernissageTV art tv by Enrico


Alexander Hahn and Yves Netzhammer

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Yves Netzhammer, Furniture of Proportions (preparatory sketch), 2008; Courtesy the artist and Galerie Anita Beckers, Frankfurt, Germany; Copyright 2008 Yves Netzhammer

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
July 10 through October 5, 2008

Room for Thought pairs two computer-generated video installations by Swiss artists Alexander Hahn and Yves Netzhammer that reveal a fascination with internal landscapes of the mind. Hahn's single-channel, interactive video projection Luminous Point (2006) allows the viewer to take a self-guided tour of a virtual simulation of the artist's Manhattan apartment, using a remote control to navigate a gamelike labyrinth of spaces derived from digital manipulations of photographic and filmic records. Where Hahn's hybrid space incorporates images of the real world, Netzhammer presents a poetic world of pure invention. Premiering at SFMOMA, his new three-channel, site-specific installation Furniture of Proportions (2008) incorporates highly stylized wall drawings, animation, and sculptural objects to create an intricate spatial narrative.

Organized by Rudolf Frieling, SFMOMA's curator of media arts, the exhibition occupies adjacent galleries and represents two generations of artists who have consciously worked with the computer as a formal artistic tool and means of expression. Both Hahn and Netzhammer combine a variety of traditional media with computer techniques in order to articulate a deep concern with the histories of philosophy and art. The artists also share an interest in human thought processes and the interplay between external images in the world and internal images in the mind. Undertaken as an open-ended investigation, their art is concerned with transience and states of change, and deals in surrealistic effects, associative thinking, and temporal multiplicity.

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Originally posted on e-flux shows :: rss by Rhizome


UV Tagging

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Initially, Elliott Malkin's new work, Graffiti for Butterflies, reads like a science fair project. One can just see the riveting subtitle, "Directing monarch butterflies to urban food sources along migratory routes in North America" taped-up in bold letters across the top of a trifold sign affixed with statistical charts and photographic evidence. In truth, this mostly internet-based project is a perfect spoof of the recent spate of R&D art experiments that saturate the web, performing rather than practicing science, even as it provides us with a series of informative links and nice photos of caterpillars and butterflies thriving in the wilds of midtown Manhattan. Malkin's big idea was to spraypaint printed decals of milkweed flowers (the food source of choice for Monarchs) with aerosol sunblock that reflects UV light, thus making it stand out to those creatures with "butterfly vision." The images are then to be placed remarkably close to the real thing they represent, in order to broadcast the signal (Malkin's got the techie language down pat) to the migratory creatures that they have arrived at a way station. He likens it to "the equivalent of a fast-food sign on a highway, advertising rest stops." A demo video, in simulated "butterfly vision," illustrates the process of creating these nouveau golden arches. It would be ironic if hordes of monarchs took the bait, as the same type of mimicry the artist invokes is a natural defense strategy often used by other species of butterflies hoping to masquerade as the poison creatures. So far, Malkin's only tested one "prototype," but it did manage to attract a butterfly who even colonized the potted milkweed with her own caterpillar eggs. Ultimately, he confesses to being more interested in distributing the idea than tagging the entire city himself. This ...

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