Posts for February 2008

The Kinetic Image

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January 30 - February 24, 2008

Reception: February 14, Second Thursday Art Night 6 - 8pm
Gallery Talk: Juror, Patrick Lichty, 7pm

The Target Gallery's first exhibition of 2008, Kinetic Image, features technology-based artwork that goes beyond the static digital print...

This exhibition highlights the latest developments in New Media and the more traditional approach to kinetic sculpture. Our juror is Chicago artist Patrick Lichty who is also a digital intermedia designer, writer, professor and independent curator. Lichty's choices feature work by artists from across the country and an artist from the Ukraine. The chosen work examines art in motion, from time-based video to kinetic sculpture to work that gives the illusion of motion.

There were close to 200 entries for Lichty to choose from, and as he began this curatorial challenge he started by asking the question, 'what is a kinetic image, given that kinetic art has been around for a very long time?' He also asks the question, 'what is the nature of motion-based arts, and how is the idea of motion so inspirational to the human animal that it inspires us to create kinetic works?' He challenged himself with the quest to answer these very broad questions by choosing work that includes video and new digital forms but also including work that acknowledged a variety of content that expressed and portrayed an illusion of motion.

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Beyond Skin

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When we speak of borders, we often overlook one very important frontier: the flesh. Our skin is, in ways real and conceptual, the boundary between ourselves and the world that we perceive, and the status of that surface is currently just as contested as many geopolitical borders. In a major exhibition at FACT-Liverpool, entitled, "Sk-interfaces", 17 artists are presenting designer body parts, synthetic organisms, and artificially augmented organs in an effort to explore "the idea of skin as a place where art, science, philosophy, and social culture meet." These modifications reflect concurrent shifts in technology, architecture, and broader currents in art practice, according to curator Jens Hauser. The show features ground-breaking work like ORLAN's Harlequin Coat (2007), which is patched together of in vitro cells from various species; Eduardo Kac's Telepresence Garment (1996) in which the human body becomes the host for a robotic cloth meant to symbolize the fabric of "the mediascape;" and Stelarc's infamous Extra Ear: Ear on Arm (1997) in which the resulting implantation is self-explanatory. Many of the artists explore what it means to cohabitate, at a cellular level, with other species, while others explore the politics of corporeal trade. Benoit Mangin offers art collectors the opportunity to graft a piece of his skin onto their body, while Julia Reodica's provocative hymNext Designer Hymen Series (2004-2005) merges her own vaginal tissue with the muscles of other animals, to create a sculptural product that constitutes "re-virginization" and addresses international cultural discourses of female mutilation. Also included in the exhibition are the Tissue Culture and Art Project, Wim Delvoye, Art Orienté objet, Critical Art Ensemble, Zbigniew Oksiuta, Jun Takita, Julia Reodica, Maurice Benayoun with Jean-Baptiste Barriere, The Office of Experiments, Zane Berzina, Jill Scott, Olivier Goulet, Yann Marussich, and Kira O'Reilly. The show ...

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OPEN CALL: Expo Brighton

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Expo is the hub and playground of the experimental music and sound art scene in the UK and beyond. Free and open, this unique platform mobilises a national network of artists and engages with communities from all backgrounds- placing sonic art and the people who make it in direct contact with the public. Expo steps out from traditional venues and into spaces that inspire artist and audience alike to reconsider their environments.

Annually relocating, Expo traverses the country and disperses into the locality it arrives in, scattering events, happenings and sounds across the towns and cities it visits, joining together place, people and art. In the spirit of open culture and accessibility Expo has developed a unique social community ethic amongst its many contributing artists and has encouraged highly creative approaches to the staging of new work.

After the success of last year's Expo Plymouth the focus now shifts to Expo Brighton for 4-6 July 2008. This weekend of performance, exhibition, presentation, discussion and broadcast will highlight the broadest possible range of approaches and thinking surrounding the sonic arts. We welcome and encourage submissions of all kinds to add to our wide ranging programme. As well as our regular annual call for submissions of all types of sound based work festival partners Radio Reverb and Sonic Arts Network are offering two commission awards for the creation of new work by UK-based artists. The deadline for submissions is the 14 March. For full details on how to submit, and commission proposal guidelines, please see: www.sonicartsnetwork.org

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Originally posted on free103point9 Newsroom by Rhizome


Bad Beuys, Bad Beuys

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Bad Beuys Entertainment is an art collective that was founded in 1999 at Cergy-Pontoise in the Parisian suburbs. Their creative mission is summed up in their moniker: a hybrid of American showbiz-ness (aka Bad Boys Entertainment, a major U.S. hip-hop recording label) and the ideals of German artist Joseph Beuys, whose conception of social relationships as art has had enduring influence. Fittingly, their works operate between the slickness of commercial entertainment and the human or handmade. Take Champions (1999). Recently exhibited in New York by independent curator Hanne Mugaas, the mock music video, which possesses the beaten-up quality of a bootlegged VHS tape, features three boys in tracksuits dancing. Without a refrain or climax to abide by, their choreography progresses into a parody of itself with initial tough guy moves replaced by what looks like a combination of elementary school theater and voguing. Meanwhile, tracksuits begin to fly (via special effects) and the video, itself, drops audio for the entire last half only to amble back at the credit sequence. Long before the onset of video-sharing platforms, the three handcrafted what would be an amazing Youtube find: an amateur homage to the culture industry that winds up as a critique not only of media's power, but our own consumption of it. Another video, not available online, is SICTOM (2001), in which the group enacted a soap opera in an IKEA store, using the kitchen, bathroom and bedroom displays as ready-made backdrops. The group also makes sculptures, light installation, websites and more. Those with an appreciation of early net art should visit the website of Matthieu Clainchard, one of the founding members, for an intricate mash-up of browser windows that present bits and pieces of manifestos and artworks as well as links to peer projects and artists, such as ...

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hearing out the space

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"hearing out the space" (2008) by Robert Wodzinski

Originally posted on jpegmess log by Rhizome


"Wifi-Hog" at MoMa's "Design and the Elastic Mind"

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My project, Wifi-Hog (pictured above) is included in the show "Design and the Elastic Mind" which opens February 24th, 2008 at New York's Museum of Modern Art (MOMA).The exhibition, curated by Paola Antonelli, will focus on designers' ability to grasp momentous changes in technology, science, and social mores, changes that will demand or reflect major adjustments in human behavior, and convert them into objects and systems that people understand and use. The exhibition will be gathering over 100 designers approaching the discipline in novel and exciting ways. Check it out if you are in NYC!

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Jonah Brucker-Cohen's "Wi-Fi Hog" is a "personal system for a laptop or portable computer that enables people to gain complete control over a public access wireless network". The work deals with the topic of shared resources raised by wi-fi networks. More below:

WiFi-Hog is a personal tool to enable both private interaction in public space as well as social obstruction and deconstruction of shared resources. This approach could shift the idea of a network from a shared experience to one of individual connections between people and their link to the Internet - ie. the dissolution of LANs. The project is based on a similar idea of how property was acquired before zoning laws and how land was a public resource that had to be regulated (such as the Homestead Act of 1862 *see note below) due to people using it in ways that the public or government objected. My aim is to investigate how the same could be said about Wi-Fi networks, if they leak or pervade into public space they should be used in any way the person inhabiting that area wishes to use them.

Originally posted on coin-operated by Rhizome


Get Physical

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The cost of "fabbing" or digital fabrication, a printing process that allows people to manufacture 3D objects with laser technology, has slowly fallen within the past few years, inviting speculation that it could possibly be used in the commercial market. Digital fabricators are incredibly versatile tools, applicable to a range of materials, including ceramic, cardboard, plaster- and, techniques, such as milling, forming, building. The group exhibition "Beyond the Screen", which opened over the weekend at [DAM] Berlin, explores digital fabrication's artistic applications in light of the increasing availability and flexibility of these machines. Organized by Marius Watz's ongoing curatorial project for generative strategies in art, Generator.x, the show is one part of DAM Berlin’s larger program on fabbing for Club Transmediale, which includes performances and a workshop. The participants in the exhibition operate between the fields of architecture, design, and art, yet share a practice of using digital fabrication to render complex computationally derived forms into tangible sculptures. True to its name, "Beyond the Screen" features works by a selection of artists who view code as a building block for concrete sculpture. Architects Marc Fornes (theverymany) and Skylar Tibbits collaborated on the installation Aperiodic Vertebrae (2008). An assembly of triangular shapes, the overall structure resembles the dismantled skeleton of a reptilian dinosaur. The form comes out of experimentations with generative geometry in the program Rhino3D, a popular scripting tool used by architects. Artist Jared Tarbell, who recently turned to laser cutting to realize his 2D work in a physical format, produced varying sized cubes with cut out circular flourishes, which he then displayed with loose floral pieces. Interactive design studio TODO hung a delicate quilt of perforated bulbous shapes in the space, whose contours gradually thinned from top to bottom. While currently the applications for digital ...

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"Fanatic" Solo Show by Jillian Mcdonald at 1708 Gallery

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"Fanatic" - a solo show feautruing the work of New York artist Jillian Mcdonald - opens at 1708 Gallery in Richmond, Virginia on February 1st, and runs through March 1st, 2008.

This retrospective of sorts highlights work from the past five years which can best be described as culture-jamming.

In Mcdonald's recent work spanning video, web art, performance, and photography, she addresses the American cult of celebrity, the fantasy that buoys extreme fandom, and the mechanisms of "fear as entertainment" at work in horror films. The presence of her image in the work serves not as a self-portrait, but as a projection of universal emotions such as desire or fear. In "Me and Billy Bob" she digitally manipulated romantic scenes from Hollywood films starring actor Billy Bob Thornton, creating a soft critique of celebrity obsession. In "Screaming", she inserted herself into popular horror films such as The Shining and Alien, screaming at the monsters to scare them away or blow them to smithereens. She confounds the traditional roles of "victim" and "predator", or "star" and "fan", to transcend cinematic conventions. In "Horror Makeup" she applies makeup on a daily subway commute, transforming herself into a zombie.

[LINK]

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Call for Participation VERSION>08 DARK MATTER

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Version>08 DARK MATTER
April 17 - APRIL 27, 2008
Chicago, USA
Call for Participation
Deadline for submissions: FEBRUARY 25, 2008
version site:: http://www.versionfest.com

DARK MATTER
In 2008, Dark Matter is all around us. Us artists, us activists, us outlaws. All of us, we are engaged in a culture war and economic struggle against establishments in all their guises. We form communities to counter the alienation of everyday life, and the commercial and institutional structures that stifle reality. We desire another world.

And we're not alone. As artist-activist Greg Sholette says, "a hidden social production has always found its own time and space apart from hegemonies of power and the objectifying routines of work. This dark matter resistance extends well beyond conventional conflicts between labor and capital to form a murky excrescence of affects, ideas, histories, sentiments, and technologies that shift in and out of visibility like some half-submerged reef."

In 2008, we think it's time for things to shift. It's time to re-ignite dormant forces within the murky worlds of radical culture. It's time to dive.

And how? From April 17-27 (11 days), we are gathering to celebrate, identify, discuss and act on the workings of Dark Matter. Version>08: DARK MATTER will showcase emerging, progressive trends in art, politics, technology and music. We'll gather and see how our peers in the counterculture create work, spaces, tactics and strategies. We'll witness multiple possibilities for the future, and leave ready to act.

Please visit http://www.lumpen.com/V8/theme.html to see what we are looking for and submit your project.

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Straight-Faced Art

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Opening this weekend at San Francisco art space, The Lab, is the third and final installment of an international exhibition informed by a comedy genre known as "deadpan." Named "Deadpan Exchange", the project refers to communicative moments in which a statement is delivered with a straight face and the listener must determine whether it is funny or tragic. It is a model which gives the audience power to react and move in their own direction, and in this case it serves as a nice simile for the form of collaboration among the participants. The first two installments of the show were in Berlin and Copenhagen, and in each iteration a group of artists brought their work abroad, made their "statements" and then a subsequent group responded in the next show. Pieces have included a PowerPoint video by co-organizer Jonn Herschend, entitled, The Exact Chain of Events; Kara Hearn's video, 7 reincarnations, in which the artist "re-shot scenes from 7 Hollywood films in her apartment;" and video and installation projects by several artists that question the fidelity of language in storytelling and translation. This final chapter includes work by the Danish Koh-i-noor collective and the show opens with audio/visual performances by Joe McKay, Matthew Hughes Boyko, and the aggressive mimes of Team Lexington. "Deadpan Exchange" is intended to "begin a dialog that might not otherwise take place outside of formal institutions," and like all deadpans, it requires audience participation. - Marisa Olson

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