Posts for October 2007

Vectors Difference issue now online!

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Vectors: Journal of Culture and Technology in a Dynamic Vernacular is pleased to announce the launch of its new issue devoted to the theme of Difference: http://www.vectorsjournal.org
Our fifth issue of Vectors stages multiple examinations of the notion of difference as it plays out in a variety of spheres, discourses and practices, while also privileging race and ethnicity as a central through-line of digital culture, a recurring ghost in our networked machines.. Featured scholars include David Theo Goldberg/Stefka Hristova, Wendy Chun, Mark Kann, Jon Ippolito, Minoo Moallem, Jennifer Terry and Christian Sandvig. Vectors is produced by editors Tara McPherson and Steve Anderson, co-creative directors Erik Loyer and Raegan Kelly, and programmer Craig Dietrich with additional design by Alex Ceglia.

Vectors is an international peer-reviewed electronic journal dedicated to expanding the potentials of academic publication via emergent and transitional media. Vectors brings together visionary scholars with cutting-edge designers and technologists to propose a thorough rethinking of the dynamic relationship of form to content in academic research, focusing on the ways technology shapes, transforms and reconfigures social and cultural relations. We only publish works that exceed the boundaries of print.

Please also explore previous issues in the Vectors Archive and contribute to an ongoing dialogue with the project creators via the Vectors Forums. Feel free to share this announcement widely.

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Tara McPherson


[game play]

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Game Music, performed at surfers’ point in Santa Barbara. Music is produced by altering the sounds of the weapons from the 1st person shooter Unreal Tournament 2004. All of the recordings are made by playing the video game.

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Capture The Artist, 2004, by Vladimir Todorovic. This five day one-on-one paintball tournament against individuals from the audience, was engaged by the artist with the idea to integrate the virtual world of gaming and the various worlds that intertwine within the gallery space.

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


Viewer-Generated Art

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While Google, Rupert Murdoch, and their corporate peers have just begun to grapple with ways to profit from the phenomenon, artists were early in embracing user-generated content as a way for viewers to help create what they consume. Work that directly uses web portals such as Flickr, YouTube, and MySpace or virtual worlds, such as Second Life--along with projects that demonstrate similar principals of generative consumption--have become a significant part of the collection of interactive art at the ZKM (Center for Art and Media) in Karlsruhe, Germany. As a part of the institution's 10-year anniversary celebrations, its media museum has organized YOU_ser. The Century of the Consumer, an exhibition of work that, in one way or another, requires a viewer's input for completion. Opening on October 20th (Vernissage TV already has behind-the-scenes video of the installation in progress available on its website) and running through December 31st, the exhibition includes progenitors of contemporary viewer-enabling practices by Nam June Paik and Joseph Beuys, as well as contemporary work created for the exhibition. The wide-ranging group of more than two dozen artists with work in the show spans from prolific Sao Paolo artist Giselle Beiguelman, who works in media from video to wireless communication networks; and Milan photographer and filmmaker Armin Linke, who recently began allowing viewers create custom artist books from a selection of his photographs; to the five-artist video game developer and imprint Susigames. Curated by ZKM Chairman and CEO Peter Weibel, the exhibition celebrates the democratic stroke inherent in a user-enabled creative process that turns consumers of art into artists, curators, and producers.

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Seeing It; Swimming in It

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Literature accompanying a new exhibition at Cornell University's Johnson Museum of Art writes the history of video art in terms of two modes of expression: "feedback" and "immersion." The first encompasses work that uses the camera to literally reflect a moment while the latter covers encircling--and frequently more cinematic--installations. Looking back on the last 15 years, the show, titled Stop. Look. Listen: An Exhibition of Video Works, traces these tendencies into the present with work by Burt Barr, Mircea Cantor, Amy Globus, Christian Marclay, and 12 other artist working primarily in the medium. On the immersive end of the spectrum, Janet Biggs's 1997 work 'Water Training' surrounds viewers on both sides with wall-size projections of floating figures--a horse, synchronized swimmers--shot from under water. Slater Bradley, on the other, implicates the viewer not through inundation, but by creating a sense of watching a home video with the 2003 work 'Phantom Release,' which displays footage of Kurt Cobain styled to look like it was shot with a handheld camcorder. On November 9th, Smithsonian American Art Museum film and media curator John Hanhardt discusses both approaches to the video-viewer relationship with the lecture 'Media Matters: Cinephilia and Installation Art.' Perhaps signifying a give and take between the two, Janine Antoni's 2002 tightrope act 'Touch' screens on the building's facade throughout the exhibition.

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Into the Wild

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Nature and technology are often forced into an antagonistic relationship and artists Cary Peppermint and Christine Nadir, known jointly as EcoArtTech, seek to problematize this faulty opposition. "The question of whether human use of technology is ecologically a fault or a strength, the relation of the digital to the natural, the expansion of the imagination of what constitutes technology" are a few of the lines of inquiry which form the core of their work. A Series of Practical Perfomances in the Summer of 2005 was a series of performances in which the artists negotiate their relationship to nature and the idea of 'wilderness.' Slightly ritualistic and also humorous, one performance enacts an important element of our modern quest for nature--driving there. For their newest project, Untitled Landscapes for Portable Media Players Peppermint and Nadir, as the title would suggest, offer a series of four moving landscapes to be played on your iPod (or whatever portable device you might use). In the tradition of the landscape painting these moving images offer the viewer a chance to contemplate the sublime character of nature, but in the case of EcoArtTech's landscapes, the sublime is sublimated under layers of technological intervention.

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diamond spinnaz

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Originally posted on Blogosphere by billy


Steve Lambert » Design Camouflage: Look Like Your Enemy

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Design Camouflage

[Steve Lambert:] I just published step by step instructions on how to match fonts and mimic designs to look like corporate or government signage. I realized that over the years, I’ve refined a little technique that has become rather efficient and helpful. I pass it on in the hopes that others can use it as well.

Links to projects that use this technique in part or full:
Ronald’s Crisis
Emma Goldman Institute for Anarchist Studies
Soap Box (Crazy You)
Puppet Street Project

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Originally posted on del.icio.us/marisaolson by marisaolson


Warbike

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Warbike

Warbike, a work by David McCallum currently featuring in Sound Cycles and Mobile City at Interaccess, Electronic Media Arts Centre in Toronto, is a mobile reception unit for wireless networks which transforms the:

wireless network activity into sound. As you cycle the streets, you’ll hear the activity of this invisible communications layer that permeates our public spaces.

David’s thesis about the Warbike (which includes some interesting references to works I have not seen before) on his website is worth a look.

Originally seen on the Sonic Arts Network mailing list, Sanlist.

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Originally posted on Network Research by Rhizome


Video Hang Up

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The popularity of narrative video work owes much to its historical relationship to experimental film, but installed in a gallery on mounted screens or projected on the wall, the medium begins to have more in common with painting than cinema. This kinship bears out in much of the work in 'Animated Painting,' a straightforwardly titled exhibition at the San Diego Museum of Art, which runs through January 13. A greatest-hits of recent work--most from the last five years--that incorporates traditional illustration and painting techniques, the show features the Barnstormers, Sadie Benning, Jeremy Blake, Serge Onnen, and others, crossing paper and canvas approaches with the conventions of small-screen animation. Some are literally grounded in handmade images. William Kentridge's 2003-04 'Tide Table' turns sketches into an animated film, subsequently transferred to video and screened on a monitor, telling the story of a white industrialist wandering through social realities of South Africa, and Robin Rhode's 'Harvest' shows the artist watering a stand of illuminated lines growing in stop motion. Others take up the painterly attributes of digital media. Takeshi Murata's 'Untitled (Pink Dot)' from 2006 samples footage from 'Rambo, First Blood,' twisting violent moments into pixilated spasms and melting images—all while a hypnotic pink pupil dilates in the foreground. Several works in the show can be previewed in a television-spot-style montage on the museum's Web site, but perhaps realizing that the installation as much as the processes underpinning the work ties video to other media not bound to the theater, the SDMA has enlisted Wit Pimkanchanapong, who also contributes work to the show, to design the exhibition space. - William Hanley

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Performance and Documentation

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Historically, what remains of performance art are documents and anecdotes. While the anecdote ends up as lore and possibly lives on in an art history text, the document has taken on a hotly contested function in recent years as photographs of seminal performances have become valuable objects and in some instances come to stand for the original performances themselves. How does the relationship between the document and the performance change when performances take place in virtual spaces, or are streamed live on the web? How does this blur the line between a performance and its documentation? For the month of October, Vancouver, British Columbia is host to the LIVE Performance Art Biennale--a series of performances, panels, and exhibitions over multiple weeks on multiple sites. Almost all of the activities are being documented and updated constantly, online, in the form of text, photographs, and video--eliminating a degree of distance that has normally existed between the event and its trace. The document is a key element in Friday's 'The Great Learning,' in which Michael Morris and Vincent Trasov reanimate the documents of their past performances, and on Tuesday October 23rd this increasing simultaneity of performance and document will be explored in 'Bodies

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