Posts for May 2007

trackingtransience.net

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personal website: total self-surveillance. [Hasan Elahi]

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Originally posted on del.icio.us/network/marisaolson by fakeisthenewreal


Heavy Opera: An Audio Tour to Awaken Londoners to

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The Impact of Financial Systems on Climate Change

John Jordan and James Marriott's operatic audio tour set in London's Square Mile is intended to awaken city workers to the impact of financial systems on climate change. But not only does And While London Burns misgauge how much the suits already know, its hysterical tone also harmonises too easily with the coming new eco-order.

[More....]

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Interview with Vito Campanelli about Web Aesthetics

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Interview with Vito Campanelli about Web Aesthetics
By Geert Lovink

Vito Campanelli
Vito Campanelli

Ever since I worked with Matthew Fuller in 2004 on A Decade of Web Design, I have been interested in the question if there is such a thing as 'web aesthetics' that could operate beyond the overheated nineteen nineties Internet rhetoric. It is easy to historicize net.art as a pseudo historical avant-garde and then declare it dead, but what's the point of such an all too obvious statement?


read more

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Originally posted on post.thing.net - A lean, mean, media machine. by Joseph Nechvatal


[Peter Vink]

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1982.gif

"1982" (2000) is an installation of light and sound at the subway station Gerdesiaweg/Rotterdam. The existing illumination is transformed into a light organ. The lights respond disco-like to the music playing over the intercom. This music consists of hits from 1982, the year the station was built. The replacement of the entire interior is also the end of this installation, which is meant as an ode to the year of the station’s construction.

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"GIF Museum" (2006) is a pocketmovie for mobile phones constructed from a collection of found GIF’s. Both works by Peter Vink.

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


Interview with Natalie Bewernitz and Marek Goldowski

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Miguel Amado:

+Commissioned by Rhizome.org+
Interview with Natalie Bewernitz and Marek Goldowski
by Miguel Amado

Cologne-based German artists Natalie Bewernitz & Marek Goldowski were recently featured in 'Volume,' a group show at Brooklyn's 3rd Ward that explored sound, 3D animation, and video as privileged media in contemporary art. Their participation in this exhibition followed a 6-month residency at New York's Location One, where they developed a new multi-stage project, 'Unveiled Presence (Secret Sounds),' the second part of which was on view in 'Volume.' As illustrated by this piece, Bewernitz & Goldowski employ technology in different yet significant ways to create emotionally powerful interactive installations often involving computer-based self-generating sound. Here, Rhizome Curatorial Fellow Miguel Amado interviews them about their practice.

[Click-through for full interview.]

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Miguel Amado


Mark Tribe: Port Huron Project

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The Port Huron Project is a series of reenactments of protest speeches from the 1960s and '70s. Each event takes place at the site of the original speech, and is delivered by an actor to an audience of invited guests and passers-by. Videos based on these reenactments are presented in various venues and distributed online and on DVD as open-source media. The project is inspired by the Port Huron Statement, the visionary 1962 manifesto of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS)*, a student activist organization that played a key role in the American New Left.

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Originally posted on del.icio.us/network/marisaolson by leisurearts


Psychobotany: Revolutionary Breakthroughs in Human/Plant Communication

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  <p><img alt="Toms_Box.jpg" src="http://www.turbulence.org/blog/images/Toms_Box.jpg" width="200" height="133" border="0" style="float: left; margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px";><p></p>

An evening of psychobotany with performances, presentations, and live demos by Botanicalls and the Center for Tactical Magic :: May 15, 8pm :: Machine Project, 1200 D North Alvarado Street, Los Angeles, CA.

Wouldn't it be great if your plants could call you if they needed water? The Botanicalls team has found a way to make this happen. When a plant on the Botanicalls network needs water, it can call a person and ask for exactly what it needs. The Botanicalls team will be on-hand to demonstrate their unique system of human/plant communication and promote inter-species understanding.

The Center for Tactical Magic presents a performance lecture exploring the magic and mystery of psychobotany. Ranging from Moses's consultation with a burning bush to the Pentagon's recent development of "sentinel plants", Aaron Gach of the CTM provides a brief history of plants as purveyors of knowledge. Audience members will also participate in a live demonstration of extra-sensory perception mediated through the cooperation of living plants.

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Originally posted on networked_performance by Rhizome


9 Evenings: Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T.)

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Series of 10 DVDs memorializing 9 Evenings: Theatre & Engineering - a legendary series of theater, dance, music and performances at the New York 69th Regiment Armory in 1966 organized by Robert Rauschenberg. Participants were Robert Rauschenberg, John Cage, David Tudor, Yvonne Rainer, Deborah Hay, Robert Whitman, Steve Paxton, Alex Hay, Lucinda Childs and Oyvind Fahlstrom.

In 1966 10 New York artists worked with 30 engineers and scientists from the world renowned Bell Telephone Laboratories to create groundbreaking performances that incorporated new technology. Video projection, wireless sound transmission, and Doppler sonar - technologies that are commonplace today - had never been seen in the art of the 60's. The 9 Evenings DVD Series, one on each artist's performance that will be released sequentially over the next two years, is an important documentation of the collaborations between the artists and engineers that produced innovative works using these emerging technologies. These performances still resonate today, as forerunners of the close and rapidly-evolving relationship between artists and technology.

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Originally posted on del.icio.us/ana.otero by ana.otero


Shoot an Iraqi

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Iraqi-born artist Wafaa Bilal's latest installation, 'Domestic Tension,' has been catching the attention of Internet users. During May, Bilal is living in Chicago's Flat File Galleries, where a 24-hour web-cam is allowing visitors to his Website to scrutinize his daily routine, chat with him, or even to remotely shoot him with a robotic paintball gun. Bilal's uncanny perfomance is documented by a video-diary posted at YouTube, as well as a slide show--hosted by a local newspaper, the Chicago Tribune--in which a series of images illustrate the project while a voice-over (by the artist himself) explains its origins, intentions, and results. 'Domestic Tension' is rooted in the artist's interest in audience engagement via interaction and the combination of real and virtual experiences. However, the work supersedes the discussion of this critical issue in new media art, becoming a powerful allegorical examination of US politics in relation to Iraq. On the one hand, he created a surveillance system that evokes the military apparatus; on the other, his confinement alludes to the current symbolic captivity of the Iraqi population. This topic is further explored by the use of a technological device that brings to mind the playful video games found in so many Western homes that simulate the violence that characterizes the Iraqi region during the current war. If the name of the piece articulates the anti-Bush protests that recently stormed the US, nevertheless the title that Bilal initially envisaged better express the meaning of the work: 'Shoot an Iraqi.' This, in fact, is what has been taking place at Flat File Galleries considering that, as reported in the May 10 issue of the Chicago Tribune, 'As of lunchtime Wednesday [...] about 1,850 rounds have been fired in the room...' - Miguel Amado

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Steampunk Keyboard Mod

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My goal with this project was to build a retro keyboard that was fully functional and of a sufficient quality that it could be used everyday by a touch typist. In order to achieve this I chose a high quality (though widely available) keyboard as my starting point. This is an IBM Model M "Clicky" keyboard. They were made starting in the mid 1980's and a version is still manufactured today. This particular keyboard was made in 1989 and shipped with and IBM PowerStation 530, a UNIX box the size of a kegerator.

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Originally posted on The Steampunk Workshop by Rhizome