Posts for March 2007

politics

(0)

vput.gif
whole thread looks great

MORE »

Olia Lialina!

Originally posted on nasty nets by Rhizome


Kate Pemberton; Endfile

(0)

Kate Pemberton

Endfile the website of Kate Pemberton lists a wide selection of her work, some for sale, some not. The work largely:

electronic and textile based contemporary art

draws on computing / new media and it’s visual / language based culture. It references programming, protocols, iconography, acronyms to name a few which are represented as traditional art objects such as embroidery (image above) or unusual artifacts such as the Vacuum Filaments and Cardboard Networked (image below left and right). The work:

addresses the cultural effects that technology has on society, by examining the influence of the machine and of digital technologies. Art pieces range from interactive electronic installations, to canvas based work and textiles. Ideas stem from the status of craft objects in an age of electronic consumerist culture. Crossovers are identified between computer graphics and craft techniques, these are explored in the creation of tangible art objects.

Kate Pemberton

For those of you interested in Kate's work but find some of it out of your price range make sure you have a look at the Edition Message Samplers (EMS) which have some free patterns to download, cheap mobile phone wallpapers and very reasonable embroidery kits.

MORE »

Originally posted on Network Research by Rhizome


Poetic Terrorism and Guerrilla Art in the 21st Century

(0)

226hammeringmanballchain.jpg

by Jane Crayton aka JanedaPain

"Art as crime; crime as art." Hakim Bey

One of the most relevant statements made about art by a man who walked the line of expressionism. Hakim Bey, did he see the future, or did he contemplate the past, a combination of both I would guess.

The word guerrilla is a word of Spanish descent (guerra, meaning war) first used to describe the Spanish-Portuguese guerrilleros (insurgents). Guerrilleros have existed through out time often in defense of some wrongs imposed to a group of less represented and defended peoples. They often fight a foreign invader or a ruling government and crimes against humanity. In the modern world we have seen these same groups and individuals come out in a new form of guerrilla tactics that is often non-violent and thought provoking art. Unfortunately in the post 9/11 era we are now limited in our expressions, for fear that they may be considered terrorism and not art. Mind you some of these artist push the line, evacuating neighborhood and closing down cities, all in the name of their art projects and political views. But is it the over reaction of our post 9/11 era that has taught us to react with such eager and violent haste, and condemn the works of these political artist?

Is it the art or the tactics, that deliver the fear that resonates in the unaware and suddenly captured audience? That sudden and captured audience today can be an over alerted citizen or government workers. With the heightened threat of terrorism and the orange security levels at the airports, we are all being programmed that we are never to be safe again. And what a great subject for an art project, huh? Artist around the world are finding them selves in ...

MORE »

via spectre

Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


On Visual Culture and Bioscience

(0)

via National Academy of Sciences :

Virtual Symposium
On Visual Culture and Bioscience


March 5-13, 2007


This virtual symposium is made possible through the generous support of Ralph S. O'Connor and the Marian and Speros Martel Foundation. It is sponsored by the Office of Exhibitions and Cultural Programs of the National Academy of Sciences and the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

JPG Image

Experts from around the world will discuss the intersections between the visual arts and the life sciences at this international event, which will take place on the Internet. A group of 30 participants -- comprised of artists, scientists, historians, ethicists, curators, sociologists, and writers --will present a variety of perspectives on topics such as artists in the lab, imaging in art and bioscience, and the sociological implications of the growing connections between the two fields. A complete list of participants is accessible via the link below.

Suzanne Anker, a visual artist and theorist working with genetic imagery, will moderate the discussion. She is the co-author of The Molecular Gaze: Art in the Genetic Age (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, 2004). She curated 'Gene Culture: Molecular Metaphor in Contemporary Art' (Fordham University, 1994), the first exhibition devoted entirely to the intersection of art and genetics. Anker teaches art history and theory at the School of Visual Arts in New York City where she is chair and editor of ArtLab23. She is also the host of BioBlurb on WPS1 Art Radio.


Links:


Visit the Symposium


Symposium Schedule


List of Panelists

MORE »

Originally posted on NEWSgrist by Rhizome


Jean Baudrillard (1929-2007)

(0)

On Tuesday, March 6, French theorist Jean Baudrillard passed away. Trained as a sociologist, Baudrillard put his knack for observing society and its engagement with mass media to work as a philosopher. His writings on television, video, and electronic mediation placed him among the earliest writers to have been called 'media theorists,' and after publishing approximately thirty books and many more essays, he is certainly one of the field's most prolific. Baudrillard pioneered the notion of 'hyperreality,' and his theories on simulation and simulacra are often employed in contemporary analyses of new media art. Baudrillard was also an active photographer whose art career was overshadowed by his academic celebrity, but whose creativity was nevertheless reflected in his writings on the 'ecstacy' and 'seduction' of the media. While his writing on the 'political economy' at play in semiotic exchange leaned slightly toward abstraction, he was steadfastly attentive to the real. He authored outspoken essays on AIDS, the Gulf War, the Rushdie affair, cloning, and other politicized issues. Baudrillard's more recent, albeit controversial writings about the nature of terrorism plumbed at contemporary western morality and boldly scrutinized the fear manufactured and perpetuated within networked society. He died in Paris, at the age of 77. - Marisa Olson

MORE »


farmersmanual

(0)

BuckyMedia

datadouche

datadouche

“pop music for the year 4000.”
“Formed in Vienna in the mid-1990’s, the farmersmanual collective represents media art at its most anarchistic. While being best-known for their recordings, in recent years the group have shifted their emphasis towards extensive live performances, in which imaginative computer animation, synchronized with ‘chaos-particle-accelerating’ music, and the overall ambience of uncontrollable technology form a seamless whole. This globe-trotting group with a fluctuating line-up of four to five members hail from the same Mego label roster as last year’s Avanto visitors Fennesz, Pita and Hecker. […] ‘Our performance at Gloria will not be open to remote interaction. Our presentations at Aula will discuss a lot of these issues and demonstrate some, but the main issue here is a human interface: a more intensive contact with us for a smaller group of people. Our project is a work in progress and at Aula we want to reveal the process behind it that drives us and could possibly also drive other people. Honestly, it’s also a process of understanding our own contributions to a project that has no clear definition/target. No decision, no corporation." (Hiaz via e-mail, 19.9.2001).’” [Anton Nikkila]

farmersmanual (1), farmersmanual (2), farmersmanual wiki, Mego 777

MORE »

Originally posted on Content by Rhizome


Independent Robotic Community

(0)

independent_robotic_community.jpg

Social Network for Robots and Humans

"In a special edition of El Pais Digital reporting the Arco festival in 2001, the Spanish artist Ricardo Iglesias, one of the net art pioneers in his country, said that nothing or almost nothing ("only cliché") can be said about net art in five or six lines. However he mentioned a series of isolated topics that interconnected, related to each other, that'd really express net art: the network, the global and decentralized communication, interactivity, the virtual spaces, telepresence, the chaos theory, the active and interactive principle, the telematic interfaces, the post-biological culture, the hypertextual perspective, on line-chat, the rhizome image and the state of uncertainty.

His latest artwork, Independent Robotic Community, is a sum of all of the above. Developed with Gerald Kogler the project focuses on new forms of interaction between robots and humans on two levels.The first one features a community of 20 small robots divided in two groups. Each group has a primary level of socialization and a series of sounds conforming with a single vocabulary. Each robot's initial state consists of a very simple movement within a delimitated spatial environment. When it comes across other robots, it swaps data about its state with sounds and increases its degree of socialization and the complexity of its movements. On a second level humans can interact with robots using mobile phones and Internet, communicating with them in real time and further influencing the socialization process within the independent groups. The result is an original visual representation of a social network that includes both the subjective point of view of a spy camera and the graphic display of social statistics. As to confirm that net art is the art of networking." Valentina Culatti, Neural.

MORE »

Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Interview with Jo-Anne Green

(0)

0turbullll.jpgThis year, Turbulence is celebrating its 10-year anniversary. Over the decade, the New York-based organization has commissioned over 110 pieces ($450,000) and exhibited and promoted artists' work through its Artists Studios, Guest Curator, and Spotlight sections. As networking technologies have developed wireless capabilities and become mobile, Turbulence has done a fantastic job by commissioning, exhibiting, and archiving the new hybrid networked art forms that have emerged.

I came to discover Turbulence through their blog networked_performance run mostly by Jo-Anne Green (her bio). As everyone who's involved at some point in new media art follows the blog religiously, i asked her to tell me more about the Turbulence organization, how it works, commissions, and, well... how it is financed.

Turbulence is 10 years old. How did it start? With what objectives?

0naaar9.jpgHelen Thorington, founder of Turbulence, came to the net via radio. She was the founder and executive producer of New American Radio (NAR), a series of over 300 experimental sound and radio art works commissioned over an 11-year period (1987-1998). Although some of its programs where aired in Europe and Australia, NAR was primarily dependent on the American public radio system for distribution. Within months of receiving a major grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), the series was subjected to a focus group, where its unfamiliarity proved detrimental. Labeled "minority" programming and criticized in advance for its inability to draw a large audience, it was aired by only a small number of public radio stations. While it remained on air for over ten years, and was loved and respected by stations committed to arts programming, the pressure placed on public stations to increase their audiences eventually lead to a decrease in air time for all arts programming and the suppression of the programming it was intended ...

MORE »

Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


MobSpray

(0)

mobspray.jpg

A Mobile Radicals Project

If computer applications are to become pervasive then they must become part of the everyday fabric of our lives and will provide users with the ability to interact with objects and places within both the real and virtual worlds. One trait of human behaviour in the interaction with objects appears to be an inherent passion for leaving our mark on these objects. In our current society, this is most readily evident through graffiti spray-painted in public places. To some, this is urban art reflecting the communities in which it resides, whilst to many it is an act of vandalism.

SprayCan graffiti divides communities and generations in terms of how it should be dealt with in terms of either complete acceptance or punitive action. In MobSpray we have developed a system that tries to bridge the divide as it both provides writers with a means of tagging their environment, using mobile phones and RFID tags, whilst minimising the physical effects to the landscape for the communities where it resides.

Writers' tags are deposited, and collected, from a database operating on a central server using a GPRS connection initiated by a Java application on a Nokia 5140 with an in-built RFID reader. These tags are currently displayed on the writers phone but the system is being evolved so that they can be projected on walls in urban landscapes.

MORE »

Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


DAYS OF BIOART

(0)

ana otero:

DAYS OF BIOART
A Project by CAPSULA

Centre d'Art Santa Mònica, Barcelona
Opening: 16th March, 8:00pm

Days of Bioart is an ongoing project that intends to create a space of debate and exhibition dedicated to biological and living art that reflects the increasing interest around life sciences and the influence that they are having in culture and society.

Created and coordinated by CAPSULA, Days of Bioart began in 2006 as a symposium and SymbioticA Tissue Engineering and Art Workshop.

This edition will reproduce in an exhibition space projects of artists and collectives that explore different formats in search of arising awareness on the techniques and discourses behind the new biotechnologies. It will analyse the performance potential and the laborious development of actions built around the domestication of concepts such as body architecture, semi-living, contestational biology or bioporn.

The projects and texts on show are by Critical Art Ensemble, subRosa, Guy Ben-Ary and Tanya Visosevic, Bioteknica, Stelarc and Nina Sellars, Kira O'Reilly, Marta de Menezes, Brandon Ballangee, Laura Cinti, Elio Caccavale, George Gessert, Adam Zaretsky, Julia Reodica, Jens Hauser and Dmitry Bulatov.

----------------------------------

On the 16th of March at 1:30 pm the 'CD Days of Bioart 06' that documents the first edition that took place in February 2006 will be released. www.capsula.org.es/diasdebioarte

----------------------------------

On the 7th of June the artist Adam Zaretsky will do a VIVOARTS LECTURE where he will be questioning with the public the uptake of certain techniques in modern molecular biology and the social and ethical implications they involve, including irreverent and demythologising experiences using methods such as Gooey Flesh Codex, Pure Germ Tech, Biotech Hobbyist and Body Mix, among others.
Adam Zaretsky is a bioartist and lecturer. His projects can be found at http://emutagen.com
This event ...

MORE »

Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by ana otero