Posts for January 2007

Text Art? Forget About It!

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Jason Lewis works in a variety of media to craft projects that contemplate a common mode of expression: language. In particular, his projects focus on text and the ways on which our delivery and experience of written and spoken words are influenced by engagement with the body and spatiality. His exhibition, 'Everything You Thought We'd Forgotten' (open through February 17 at Montreal's Oboro Centre for new media) presents seven projects, developed over the last seven years, 'that explore the border lands between conflicting cultural identities, memory and history, and the visual and the textual.' The artist's work is tempered by a very formal interest in the classical discipline of kinetics, as it is imagined by interactive media. 'Nine' (2001) is a personal narrative in which digital storytelling techniques meet the conventions of literary genre to employ poetry and photos of the artist in excavating 'lives that could have been--but were not--lived.' The more playful 'TextOrgan' (2000) allows users to spraypaint Lewis's poetry on a wall, while 'Cityspeak' (2006) allows users of handheld communication devices to answer a series of otherwise rhetorical questions about identity and public space. These and Lewis's other projects are extensively documented on the website for Obx Labs, the research studio directed by the artist with the mandate of pushing 'at the boundaries of computationally-based expression.' - James Petrie

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MoMA.org | Film Exhibitions | 2007 | Feedback: The Video Data Bank, Video Art, and Artist Interviews

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Feedback: The Video Data Bank, Video Art, and Artist Interviews January 25- 31, 2007

Taking place on the occasion of the publication of Feedback, The Video Data Bank Catalog of Video Art and Artist Interviews and MoMAs The Feminist Future symposium (see pg. 36), this exhibition offers screenings of video art and interviews with women in the arts drawn from the Chicago-based Video Data Bank. The Video Data Bank (VDB) was started in 1976 at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago as a collection of student productions and interviews with visiting artists. Around the same time, VDB codirectors Lyn Blumenthal and Kate Horsfield began conducting their own interviews with women artists who were underrepresented critically in the art world; these interviews soon became part of the archive. In 1980 VDB began distributing video art due to the growing need for artists representation. Over the past thirty years both collections have grown and are annotated in their newly published catalog. For this presentation, interviews and videotapes were chosen to reflect womens art making and the evolution of feminist theory over the past thirty years. Interviews are by Kate Horsfield and Lyn Blumenthal, and the videos are produced in the U.S. unless otherwise noted.

Organized by Sally Berger, Assistant Curator, Department of Film; with Blithe Riley, Editor and Project Coordinator, On Art and Artists collection, Video Data Bank. Special thanks to Kate Horsfield, Director Emeritus; Tom Colley, Collections Manager; and Abina Manning, Interim Director, Video Data Bank; and the Lyn Blumenthal Memorial Fund.

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Originally posted on del.icio.us/kick_out_the_internet_jams by kick_out_the_internet_jams


Bent 2007 : The Fourth annual circuit bending festival

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Mike writes -

"This is the Open Call for circuit builders, benders, and destroyers! The fourth year of this annual festival of music and art features nightly concerts, daily workshops, and site specific art installations. Now in three back to back incarnations in LA, Minneapolis, and NYC. Show us your stuff!" - Link.

Related:

  • The Tank - Link.
  • BLIP festival wrap up - Link.
  • Photos from BLIP - Link.

  • [More....]

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Originally posted on MAKE Magazine by Rhizome


The 21st Prix Ars Electronica 2007

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International Competition for Cyberarts "The 21st Prix Ars Electronica 2007" has a few new features.

The new Hybrid Art category, a new prize for Media.Art.Research, and the integration of Net Vision into Digital Communities are the most visible signs of the intensive work that is being done on the definition of the competition's categories. As always, the aim is to continually keep the Prix Ars Electronica updated in line with leading-edge developments in the dynamic field of cyberarts.

All details about the categories and the online submission are available online only at here.


The 21st Prix Ars Electronica 2007
Online Submission Deadline: March 9th, 2007
Total prize money: 122.500 Euro
Contact: info@prixars.aec.at

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Originally posted on Shift Blog by Rhizome


The living cinematic apparatus

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0biokkkino.jpgThe Living Screen project overlays digital pixels over biological pixels to explore the tension between the inanimate and the animate and the digital versus the biological.

The Nano-Movies are projected (projection is 200 microns square in size) on Living Screens made from different tissue sources (skin, blood, sperm or cornea cells) that transform, react and change over time and eventually die. The properties of these screens inform the content of the projected Nano-Movies. They contort the Nano-Movie, and confront the spectators with issues such as life, death, virtuality and reality.

The Living Screen has many connections to early (pre-1905) motion pictures that fall under the category of the "cinema of attractions." Tom Gunning defines the "cinema of attractions" as a form of confrontation that addresses the audience directly. "Rather than being an involvement with narrative action or empathy with character psychology, the cinema of attractions solicits a highly conscious awareness of the film image engaging with the viewers' curiosity."

Fairgrounds and vaudeville houses were where early cinema found its audiences. It was also a form of safe house for the Other. With Bio-Art proliferating throughout the world, the art galleries of today are no less a freak show, as is The Living Screen.

0mousecronea.jpg
Details of a movie projected on a mouse cornea

A project by Bio Kino: Tanja Visosevic, Guy Ben Ary and Bruce Murphy.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


i am a website and these are some videos

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Collection of videos by Kent Lambert

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Originally posted on del.icio.us/network/53os by saranrapjs


Rhizome Promotion: Happy Hosting

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What were your new year's resolutions, this year? If they included introducing yourself to the world wide web or perhaps expanding your existing online presence, then Rhizome has an offer for you. Thanks to a partnership with Broadspire, we offer affordable web hosting plans with a variety of options that will make setting up virtual shop in 2007 easier than singing Auld Lang Syne. For a low $65 annual payment, you'll get 350MB disk storage, 1GB data transfer a month, POP email, free setup, and daily content back-ups. Broadspire also offers roomier plans and a range of options for those whose 2007 ambitions are slightly larger. So realize your resolutions early this year by signing up with Broadspire and uploading those art works, writings, bottled-up opinions, photo feeds, or vlogging impulses, today! Each sign-up will drop a dime in the Rhizome donation box, and we'll say thank you by listing your name and URL on our front page, alongside supporters from years past! - Rhizome.org

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MOMA: EXHIBITION: FEEDBACK: THE VIDEO DATA BANK, VIDEO ART, AND ARTIST INTERVIEWS

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Feedback: The Video Data Bank, Video Art, and Artist Interviews
January 25�31, 2007

Taking place on the occasion of the publication of Feedback, The Video Data Bank Catalog of Video Art and Artist Interviews and MoMA�s The Feminist Future symposium (see pg. 36), this exhibition offers screenings of video art and interviews with women in the arts drawn from the Chicago-based Video Data Bank. The Video Data Bank (VDB) was started in 1976 at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago as a collection of student productions and interviews with visiting artists. Around the same time, VDB codirectors Lyn Blumenthal and Kate Horsfield began conducting their own interviews with women artists who were underrepresented critically in the art world; these interviews soon became part of the archive. In 1980 VDB began distributing video art due to the growing need for artists� representation. Over the past thirty years both collections have grown and are annotated in their newly published catalog. For this presentation, interviews and videotapes were chosen to reflect women�s art making and the evolution of feminist theory over the past thirty years. Interviews are by Kate Horsfield and Lyn Blumenthal, and the videos are produced in the U.S. unless otherwise noted.

For program, go here

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Originally posted on Art Blog by Rhizome


Neural 26 is waiting for you

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0neuu56.jpgThe new Neural issue is out.

As usual there are interviews of some of the most interesting personalities of the new media art world (Rafael Lozano Hemmer, Golan Levin, Exonemo), of the hacktivism scene (Heath Bunting, Rick Silva, etc.) and of the e-music planet (John Oswald, Geir Jenssen/Biosphere and Brian Mackern).

You'll also find reports from festivals and exhibitions and various news about what's making the new media art/e-music/hacktivism scene buzz today. You might have read about some of them on the online version of neural, but there's plenty more to discover in the magazine.

And reviews of books, dvd and cd-rom written by people who know what they are talking about (as opposed to haha! amateurs like me.) There's also a centerfold Annual Checkup by Lisa Erdman.

Go and grab it in store or subscribe to the magazine.

No one has ever managed to publish anything that looks even remotely like Neural, so if you don't know the mag yet, it's time to catch up and get a Back Issues Pack.

Btw, Alessandro Ludovico, founder and editor of Neural will be in Amsterdam on Friday January 19th as part of a panel about Offline � Online Publishing: The Love for Print in an Age of Electronic Media. There will be a live webcast and a podcast.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


hi

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M U L T I M E D I A L E p r e v i e w

M a r k C o o l e y | A r t i s t T a l k

I n t r o d u c t i o n b y M u l t i m e d i a l e c u r a t

o r N i e l s V a n T o m m e
c u r a t o r ' s o f f i c e
t h u r s d a y, j a n u a r y 1 8 7 p m

curator's office
1515 14th street nw
suite 201
washington, dc 20005

202.387.1008
www.curatorsoffice.com


curator's office is pleased to present a free preview program for
the upcoming Multimediale festival in April of 2007. Mark Cooley is a new genre artist interested in exploring politics,
economics, power, identity, and visual rhetoric in American popular
culture. His work has been shown internationally in online and
offline venues such as Exit Art, Postmasters Gallery,
Furtherfield.org and Rhizome.org.

Multimediale is an innovative four day new media art festival
curated by Niels Van Tomme that brings together a multiplicity of
people and ideas around the theme, ‘Art as Mediation’. The festival
will run April 19-23, 2007 and will be headquartered at Provisions
Library and American University, Washington DC.


http://selforganizingsystem.org/filter.html
http://www.multimedialedc.org (online soon)

Called the hippest tiniest gallery in town by Jeffry Cudlin of "The

Washington City Paper", curator's office is a micro-gallery

dedicated to presenting progressive works and ideas.

But we are a small space, so RSVPs are essential.
info@curatorsoffice ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by ryan griffis