Posts for February 2007

Beyond Painting

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After the last decade's never-ending theories proclaiming the death of painting, the medium emerged in the beginning of the 21st century as one of the most engaging forms of visual expression. However, what does painting mean today? Is it possible to consider it beyond the convention of paint on canvas? Or in relationship to 'new' media? Over the past two years, 'Imagination Becomes Reality,' a five-part exhibition cycle of the Goetz Collection in Munich, Germany, has attempted to provide, if not a definitive answer, at least a series of topics to examine this issue. Highlighting the extensive mutual influence of painting and the other fine arts characterizing our age through the juxtaposition of diverse works, the show points to collector Ingvild Goetz remarks: 'Interesting in this is that many artists expand the medium of painting in sculpture, photography, and video; that is, they 'paint' on different surfaces, whereas conversely painters often first generate their pictures on computers to then ultimately transfer them to canvas.' Opening today at Karlsruhe's ZKM, the final installment of 'Imagination Becomes Reality' brings together 49 international contemporary artists, among them Jeff Wall, creator of the iconic piece that encapsulates the organizing principle behind the project. As ZKM's head, Gregor Jansen, said in 'Restoration' (1993), 'the painted panorama as mass media and precursor to film is present as is photography and picture production.' Until May 1, visitors will have a chance to see how this work and all the others on view challenge, refer to or are informed by the Western pictorial tradition that informs today's painterly practices in other media. - Miguel Amado

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The Museum of Lost Interactions

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0casecommuni.jpgGraham Pullin asked his 3rd year students in Interactive Media Design in Dundee to engage with a history of interaction design that is much longer than that of digital electronics, and reflect on the social as well as technological changes that have taken place. They had to research Lost and Dead Media (cf. miss.gunst's post on the Found Tapes Exhibition and Zoe Irvine's Magnetic Migrating Music project) and build working models (using found objects and MaxMSP on iMacs) of fictitious historical products that might have been lost precursors to modern products and media. To underpin their authenticity, they filmed documentaries with archive film footage, and uncovered contemporary photography and packaging.

The result is the fabulous, quirky and poetic Museum of Lost Interactions (MoLI).

Examples (each of the projects deserves a post but i had to choose two of them. Some readers complain that i blog too much):

The Case Communicator, developed in 1936, was a laptop/PDA in a briefcase. This portable electronic workstation allowed male executives to get a 24/7 link to their secretary. Through the connection stream, the businessman is connected to the developers' switchboard where his personal 24 hour secretary is ready to fill his "every need" (news headlines, favourite music and schedule.) A project by Alison Thomson and Shaun McWhinnie.

Conceived at the beginning of the 70s, Pester (the Portable Enhanced System for Telecommunication Entertainment and Recreation) is the first smart phone. It contains a cassette player, camera and games as well as a phone.

0pesterr3.jpg 0pesterr22.jpg

Pester relied on a wired network using Connection Points positioned at convenient locations (parks, shopping centres and restaurants as well as regular sites along streets.) These Connection Points allowed callers to access an operator who could let them communicate with landline users, fellow Pester owners and also ...

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Interview with Cati Vaucelle

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0portraitcati.jpgWhen i asked her what she does or drink to have so much energy and creativity Cati Vaucelle simply told me that she is spending the nights playing World of Warcraft. Well, i'm sorry Cati, it doesn't work for us mere mortals! Hanging around with druids and having a stroll through Dun Morogh on the back of a tiger doesn't usually results in projects that i'd want to blog. And if Cati's avatar kills monsters and completes quests as fast as she engineers new projects then she might be one of the most formidable players around. One day she's working on a touch-sensitive dress for sensory therapy, the day after she announces that she's just finished collaborating with Hayes Raffle on a rubber stamp that children can press onto the page to record sounds into their drawings.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Sound Art Limo

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sound art limo From the AC Institute the Sound Art Limo, take a short trip around New York city in a limo while listening to historical and new sound art. Refreshments will be served. Takes place February 23, 24, 25, 2007.The Armory, Pier 94. 3pm -7 pm. Oh to be in NY!

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Originally posted on Stunned Weblog by Rhizome


They make art not bioterrorism

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0hazmatsuilu.jpgWho am i to think that i can live in the German capital and ignore the Berlinale? Yesterday i finally decided to face the queues to get tickets and grabbed the last chance to see Strange Culture, the half-documentary half fiction movie about Steve Kurtz's surreal -and ongoing- ordeal.

Kurtz, Associate Professor for Art at the University at Buffalo and one of the founding members of the Critical Art Ensemble, was preparing for a MASS MoCA exhibition a piece called Free Range Grains that lets audiences test whether food -including "organic" food- has been genetically modified when his wife Hope died of heart failure. It was the night of 11 May, 2004. Kurtz called 911, but when paramedics arrived, they became suspicious of his art supplies and called the FBI.

0akurtzz.jpgDozens of agents in hazmat suits swiftly arrived, found Petri dishes, bacterial cultures and scientific equipment, all of which Kurtz got legally (some of them he even bought on the internet) and uses in art installations that examine political, social and ethical factors involved in the field of biotechnology. The FBI confiscated his material, computers, books, and his wife's body. Even the cat, a "potential biohazard", was locked in the attic without food. The government held Kurtz as a suspected bioterrorist. A thorough inquiry showed that he wasn't possessing anything dangerous so what started as a full federal bio-terrorism investigation ended up as charges of wire and mail fraud (although no one appears to have been frauded!) He and his colleague, former head of the Genetic Department of Pittsburgh University Dr Robert Ferrell, face up to 20 years in prison.

Because Kurtz cannot legally talk about certains aspects of his case, actors Tilda Swinton, Josh Kornbluth, and Peter Coyote, are interpreting several episodes of Kurts' story. The ...

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


New Reviews on Furtherfield Feb 07.

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marc garrett:

New Reviews on Furtherfield Feb 07.

http://www.furtherfield.org

Review Title - CURATING AMBIGUITY - ELO. About - The Electronic Literature Collection, Volume One. Review by Franz Thalmair.

In autumn 2006 the ELO -- Electronic Literature Organization released the ELC1 -- Electronic Literature Collection Volume One, including selected works in New Media forms such as Hypertext Fiction, Kinetic Poetry, generative and combinatory forms, Network Writing, Codework, 3D, and Narrative Animations.

One of the main common characteristics of all Web-based literary products is that they can be read (or viewed, listened, played with, used) in multifaceted ways. Accordingly the curation of Electronic Literature is challenged by ambiguity and heterogeneity on different levels. As broadly termed by the ELO itself, Electronic Literature is a form of cultural and artistic production on the Internet with important literary aspects that takes advantage of the contexts provided by the stand-alone or networked computer. Similar to what is not yet consistently defined as Digital Art, Netart, Internet Art, New Media Art, etc. http://www.furtherfield.org/display review.php?From=Index&review_id=217

Review Title and name of work - The Possible Ties Between Illness and Success. Review by Pau Waelder. A work by Carlo Zanni in the form of a short, one-minute movie that plays over the web [1]. Starring Stefania Orsola Garello and Ignazio Oliva, the film has been produced with the quality of a major motion picture, yet it will be screened exclusively on the Internet. The reason for this is, the movie is meant to be transformed by its own audience. When users visit the website to watch it, they leave a trace in the form of data (date and time of access, IP address, country of origin and so on). This data is collected by Google Analytics, and then sent to the server that ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by marc garrett


You Are Not Here

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youarenothere.png

Reviewed by Luis Silva

"From a strict physical, corporeal point of view, ubiquity is an ontological impossibility. For as much as one would like, being in two places at the same time, for instance, the city of New York and the city of Baghdad, is not possible to accomplish. Only electrons, netart and god have the uncanny ability to present themselves in several places in one given moment.

You Are Not Here departs from and builds itself from this inability. Developed by Thomas Duc, Kati London, Dan Phiffer, Andrew Schneider, Ran Tao and Mushon Zer-Aviv and inviting people to 'explore Baghdad through the streets of New York', YANH presents itself as an urban tourism mash-up. Not only can you be in two places at the same time (the ubiquity concept we departed from), but also both places become interconnected in a psychological enactment of a meta-city. The underlying mechanism is pretty simple: users (the so-called meta-tourists) are invited to download and print on one side of a sheet of paper a map of Baghdad and on the other side a reversed map of New York. As soon as that task is accomplished the exotic sightseeing can begin. Scattered around New York are YANH street-signs that provide warned explorers (those who printed the map) as well as random passers-by the telephone number for the Tourist Hotline, where audio-guided tours of contemporary Baghdad destinations in NYC can be listened to." Continue reading You Are Not Here - You Are Not Here by Luis Silva, Furtherfield.

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Spencer Finch

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Blue (one second brainwave transmitted to the star Rigel) | 1993, microwave signal at 44mHz, 1 inch x 186,000 miles; brainwave generated while looking at Hawaii Five-O, transmitted at the speed of light to the bluest star in the night sky, where it will arrive in about 960 years.

Spencer Finch

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Originally posted on Content by Rhizome


John Cage Continues to Influence

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The works of John Cage, zen master of the musical avant-garde, inventor of the prepared piano, chance operator, mushroom hunter, macrobiotic chef, and arguably the most influential composer of the 20th Century continue their blissful roaratorio into the 21st century. Gustavo Matamoros, curator of the 19th Annual South Miami-based Subtropics Experimental Music & Sound Arts Festival, has assembled a massive and impressive festival and mini-retrospective of Cage's work in conjunction with Merce in Miami, a two-week celebration of the 50-year collaboration between John Cage and choreographer Merce Cunningham at the Carnival Center for the Performing Arts. The festival explores Cage's enduring influence in the field of dance, his central presence in the 'New York School' of experimental music and his involvement in the 'happenings' of the Fluxus and Intermedia movements. A number of brilliant performers and composers are lined up for this festival, including Christian Wolff, Joan La Barbara, Takehisa Kosugi, David Behrman, bassist Robert Black, percussionist Jan Williams, and composer John King. In addition to new works from South Florida-based composers, pianists Helena Bugallo and Amy Williams will play 4-hand transcriptions of Conlon Nancarrow's massively polyrhythmic player piano etudes and 36 pianists will perform Erik Satie's legendary 18 hour hypnosis inducing 'Vexations.' As if that wasn't enough, original Fluxus members Larry Miller and Alison Knowles will headline the festival's Flux Fair on the sands of Miami Beach, featuring Miller's 'Flux Olympics' and Nam June Paik's 'A Piano Oddyssey (a trojan horse)' in which a piano will be pushed straight out to sea. - Zach Layton

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Graffiti Research Lab » Drive-In GIF Theater

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"This is the uncut, slightly sped-up 9 min clip of all the animations that made it into our low-res-film festival in Rotterdam. Over sixty animation were sent to us via-email by the creme de le plebes of the net....."

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Originally posted on del.icio.us/inbox/marisaolson by karenn888