Posts for December 2007

Rhizome Announces Ceci Moss as New Editor

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Hi there,

I'm pleased to announce that, as of Monday, December 10th, Ceci Moss has re-joined Rhizome as Editor. An excellent and forward-thinking writer, Moss is versed in a broad range of emerging artistic practices engaged with technology particularly media art and sound. In this position, Moss will oversee Rhizome News, the Rhizome Digest, our blog and reBlog, as well as contribute to the overall direction of the organization.

Moss previously worked at Rhizome as membership coordinator and, in that position, demonstrated incredible leadership and a commitment to Rhizome's mission and community. Independently, Moss has always been focused on sound art and experimental music, working variously as a musician, writer, DJ and curator. Currently, she runs the online contemporary art and music journal A Million Keys and, for the past six years, has programmed the weekly radio show Radio Heart which features experimental, post punk, noise and miscellaneous obscurities on KALX and East Village Radio.

After an international search, the Rhizome staff felt Moss' vision, writing and project management abilities would strengthen our editorial voice and mission to further discussion around new media art. Moss writes "As editor, I plan to increase Rhizome's relevance and connection to other art practices, engage larger pertinent issues such as copyright, locative media and mobile technology, and continue to drive innovative discourse that will appeal to our diverse audience. Rhizome's unique historical and community-centered position will unquestionably direct my efforts." Moss will work with our two staff writers, Marisa Olson and Caitlin Jones, as well as freelance writers to grow our publications over the next year.


If you're interested in writing for Rhizome or want to share your project for consideration in our publications, please contact her: ceci dot moss at rhizome dot org

all best, Lauren

Executive Director ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Mader Stublic Wiermann

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I first encountered the work of Mader Stublic Wiermann when Alexander Stublic did a talk at the MediaArchitecture Conference earlier this year. He presented four projects by the group in different technical environments focusing on correlations of space by extending and transforming architectural structures. I won’t cover the entire scope of their work here but their website has more detailed descriptions of what they’ve been up to in recent years. Below was one project in particular that I like as it starts to transform the rigid structure of an architecture into a dynamic fluid skin.


The exterior of the Uniqa Tower in Vienna has been equipped with a LED-grid, a wide-meshed net of picture elements capable of receiving video-data, which are fitted into the building's facade. At first, the electronic data corresponds to the architectural structure of the tower, but during the course of its choreography, repeatedly detaches itself from the concrete shape of the building, establishing new spaces which dynamically interweave.

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Originally posted on Interactive Architecture dot Org by Ruairi


NMR Commission: “My Space Sound” by Sawako Kato

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kato_logo_300.jpg

My Space Sound by Sawako Kato [Requires Mac OSX, Flash Player, and a fast Internet connection] - My Space Sound is an audio popup book about the village called MySpace. The story starts like this: "Once upon a time there was a village called MySpace. It is the era when so-called 'Web 2.0'is still a novelty..." Users can participate in the story by entering their MySpace URL, as well as by just browsing the story. In a world composed of both facts and fictions extracted from the database, the audience gets a chance to rethink the chaotic social network space.



[LINK]

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Originally posted on Networked Music Review by jo


2008 Rhizome Commission: Gettin' Jiggly With It

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Sometimes our complex relationship to computing can be conveyed in something as simple as a jiggling jelly mold. Artist Rafael Rozendaal seems to have an innate understanding of this, and puts it to work in Rhizome's 2008 commission 'Jello Time'. In keeping with his specific style of Internet Art, this brightly colored animation reproduces the motion of jello through a series of cause and effect relations. By directing the user's movements, Rozendaal demands a different kind of interactivity than other examples of net art. Elementary mouse clicks allow you to break glass (Broken Self, 2007), cause bleeding (Fatal to the Flesh, 2004), open infinite doors (Big Long Now, 2006) or 'pull my finger' (Mister Nice Hands, 2001). It is easy to see why Rozenddal is a member of the so-called Neen movement, a loosely affiliated group of artists who, according to their manifesto , are interested in how machines "...simulate the simulation we call Nature." Accordingly, 'Jello Time' is impressive in its simulation of the jiggle of everyone's (secretly) favorite desert. - Caitlin Jones

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Oh Yeah I Love You Baby

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Oh Yeah I Love You Baby"(2007) is an album by Marisa Olson based on the most significant lyrics in pop music history.

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


Craft Hacker

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Ben Fino-Radin aligns his needlepoint work with the emerging genre of 'craft-hacking.' In his case, the Providence-based artist (who has also made his fair share of net art and electronic music) makes crafty sculptures that give form to otherwise 'intangible digital ephemera.' His large-scale representations of old web browser hourglasses suggest the nerdcore set's equivalent of Flava Flav's symbolic timepieces, while his boxy 3D gloved hyperlink pointer points explicitly to the net, pushing the language of browsing into a visceral realm often overlooked by media theorists. It's hard to call the act of pulling yarn through a plastic grid 'new' media, but the work undeniably comments on the status of technology in our domestic lives while recalling the history of homebrew hardware and software kits. Fino-Radin's 'Software' is a brilliant example of that lofty artistic tradition of estranging viewers from a familiar object in order to see it in a new light. The piece is a scaled replica of the Mac SE, complete with mouse and keyboard. The monitor's window has an open slit through which viewers can slide embroidered cards replicating popular websites such as Yahoo and Google, or cute emoticons. Thus, the work is not only interactive, but it also forges a connection between old school craft circles and the collaborative spirit of the open source community. The artist likens his practice to the copy-and-paste assemblages of Web 2.0 hackers and his patterns, palette, and dithering structure are determined by .gif compression standards. Ultimately, he says, "The environments I create with these objects are spaces for the vernacular of crafts and personal computers to rub up against each other with the goal of constructing a fictitious culture with it's own depth of tradition, ritual, and mysticism." - Marisa Olson

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More on Slocum Sample Remixer

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Even bloggers must take vacations and I am on one.
I felt that I attempted the impossible interviewing Paul Slocum last month about his sample remixer without actually having used it: the Q&A went on and on but it was like the proverbial sight-impaired men describing the elephant.
So I traveled to Texas to get a demo (and visit family members).
In the interview I asked Slocum how his software differed from Cubase or similar music production programs.
The differences are described below.
Like the sample remixer, Cubase allows you to load a long (song length) sample, cut it up into any number of clips of varying lengths, place those snippets on tracks so they play simultaneously or staggered, with on-off commands triggered by a vertical cursor passing through all the tracks. You can also copy and paste any number of sub-sequences of clips to other points on the editing grid.
Where the Slocum sample remixer differs:
1. The random loop point finder is a quick way to generate interesting-sounding clips and add them to the grid.
2. The interface is very fast because it is text-based. In other words, instead of wasting CPU resources drawing graphics of clips (with little pictures of the waveforms), the Slocum device simply shows an asterisk against a colored background.*
3. The point is not to make conventional music with a common tempo and key--the goal is abstract or semi-abstract music that is polyrhythmic, a-harmonic, and glitchy sounding, yet obeys a set structure. One could do most of this is in Cubase or Sonar but not as quickly or with the same sense of liberating experimentation this device gives you of creating random loops on the fly. (I don't know how close it is to Ableton live in terms of speed.)
4 ...

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More thoughts on Paul Slocum's sample remixer from Tom Moody. Original interview between two artists is here: tommoody.us/.../

Originally posted on tom moody by tom moody


Photos from Mike Koller's HOLIDAY REJECTS

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Mike Koller?s ?THE HOLIDAY REJECTS?
“Naughty” and “Nice” slide show of found (Googled) holiday photos - faux mantel with projected Yule log loop and found (Googled) holiday photos - projected flash animation Christmas tree

Some more shots from the show at Tinjail (start at link and scroll back) and at Flickr in the OTO set. Enjoy.

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Originally posted on MTAA Reference Resource by M.River


New Beginnings on the Bowery

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Rhizome affiliated with the New Museum of Contemporary Art in 2003, when the organizations identified a shared commitment to emerging art and ideas. Founded in 1977 by visionary curator Marcia Tucker, the New Museum is the first and only Museum in New York dedicated to contemporary art and has a tradition of innovative and risk-taking programs centered around a mission of 'new art, new ideas.' On December 1, the New Museum opened the doors to its new home, the Kazuyo Sejima + Ryue Nishizawa/SANAA-designed seven-story structure on the Bowery. Rhizome will play a significant role in the new building and partner in the presentation of new media art through co-presented exhibitions and a monthly event series. Our members receive a discount on programming and also on merchandise- books, artists limited editions- at the New Museum Store. One of our first co-presented exhibitions is BLACK ON WHITE, GREY ASCENDING, a new commission by internet art collective, YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES. Installed in the lobby gallery of the Museum, the artists expanded their usual single-channel format to a seven-screen installation that, through their signature-style language-based Flash animations, narrates a chilling story of abduction and murder from seven points of view. The main, inaugural exhibition Unmonumental is a four-part show that examines the practice of collage in contemporary art and defines the current times as an age of crumbled symbols and broken icons. Starting as a survey of recent sculpture, Unmonumental will morph into an assemblage of objects, images, sounds, and internet-based works. Montage: Unmonumental online, the fourth and final addition to the show, is organized by Rhizome, and will be on view online starting February 15. Rhizome celebrates this important phase in the life of both institutions and looks forward to connecting new media art to broader audiences through this exciting new ...

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Bartram's Travels

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"THIS world, as a glorious apartment of the boundless palace of the sovereign Creator, is furnished with an infinite variety of animated scenes, inexpressibly beautiful and pleasing, equally free to the inspection and enjoyment of all his creatures."

Thus begins 18th Century American botanist John Bartram's natural history classic (and verbosely titled), Travels Through North & South Carolina, Georgia, East & West Florida, the Cherokee Country, the Extensive Territories of the Muscogulges, or Creek Confederacy, and the Country of the Chactaws; Containing An Account of the Soil and Natural Productions of Those Regions, Together with Observations on the Manners of the Indians. Bartram not only recorded his observation and taxonomies, but also imbued them with commentary and personal mediations on American wilderness and all its inhabitants. American artist Mark Dion has long focused his work on the subject of natural history, the scientific method, and the tension between objective and subjective accounts of the natural world. In his most recent project Travels of William Bartram- Reconsidered , Dion follows the path of Bartram through Northern Florida while keeping a journal, collecting specimens (both natural and manmade), taking photographs, and recording audio and video. Like his predecessor, Dion is also publishing his travels, but in web form, allowing us to follow him on his journey in a more immediate sense. He left Bartram's Gardens in Pennsylvania on November 15th and since then has searched for Bartram's 'infinite variety of animated scenes' in the swamps of northern Florida, the bars of New Orleans, and a flea market in Charleston. Humanity is not 'other' in Dion's scientific journey. His specimens include items of botanical interest, but also images of golf carts and the fishermen who save them in a swamp. All are part of the pantheon that, for better or worse, now ...

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