Posts for December 2007

Culture in Keywords

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xutan-keywords.gifSince 2005 the Chinese artist Xu Tan has been developing research about individual psychology through the examination of language and the power of words, in particular. This project started with a group of video interviews conducted with different people in Chinese society. A first set was carried out in China's 'Silicon Valley' near Shanghai. He then talked to people with several professional backgrounds, from monks to businessmen to writers. Finally, he covered the Chinese artistic community. After analyzing the video interviews, the artist, as he said, 'identified 100 keywords based on meaning (social values), frequency (repetition), sensitivity (political), and popularity (trendyness).' For Xu Tan, these keywords 'present an insight into the collective consciousness of China.' 'Searching with Keywords,' currently on view at New York's Location One, constitutes the latest manifestation of this work. Although unfolding simultaneously in various locations, including Beijing, it is in New York that gallery-goers have a chance to contribute to the piece. Four computer stations within the gallery allow viewers to participate in an online forum that connects the different, exhibiting venues. The artist is also conducting video interviews during the show, the analysis of which is generating new keywords that reveal the attitudes of a Western audience towards his country. This new data will bring a fresh, critical perspective to Xu Tan's interpretation of China's rapidly changing identity in global culture. - Miguel Amado


http://location1.org/xutan-keywords

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December at OTO - Mike Koller’s ‘THE HOLIDAY REJECTS’

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holidayrejects

One night only!
Friday December 14 7PM to 10PM

Over The Opening is pleased to present Mike Koller’s
THE HOLIDAY REJECTS

With the proliferation of video and photography equipment and even more so the availability and user-friendly nature of at-home post-production equipment and software, the do-it-yourself documentarian is a driving force behind all our familial interactions. The need to record, in detail, the various persons and their reactions to all the activities has increasingly become the chief activity itself. The time spent face to face becomes second to the execution of a thorough archive of the event. A smiling photo is more important than the argument it took to create it, the video containing each persons thoughts for the New Year takes precedent over the people themselves. In these ways the family becomes the discarded artifact of creating a visual history of events that are largely fictionalized or staged versions of an unknown third party’s expectations.

The Holiday Season, more than any other, creates a steady stream of videos and photos posted for all to see. Presented in a one night ‘X-mas Party’ format are the photos and videos from 69 different family celebrations in a tribute to the discarded persons who were pivotal to their creation, The Holiday Rejects. True to the season, the party will feature food, drink and music to set the mood. Also featured will be three new animated video projections of a Christmas tree, a window overlooking a wintry landscape and the inescapable Yule Log. Come, imbibe, document, post.

Mike Koller is an artist and musician living and working in Brooklyn.

Upcoming events at OTO:

Jan 11 - Elaine Tin Nyo
Feb 08 - RSG (Alex Galloway)

More OTO info and directions…

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Originally posted on MTAA Reference Resource by M.River


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Excerpt from “My Temporary Visiting Position From The Sunset Terrace Bar” by Carlo Zanni.

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New work by Carlo Zanni via VVORK; more on this piece from Rhizome soon..

Originally posted on VVORK by mail


Slowed and Throwed Symphony

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A great deal of lore surrounds Ludwig Van Beethoven's arguably most famed and final composition, Symphony No. 9, including that he was completely deaf when he wrote it. When the original manuscript sold for millions at Sotheby's, their head of manuscripts, Dr. Stephen Roe said that it "is one of the highest achievements of man, ranking alongside Shakespeare's Hamlet and King Lear." While the 1990s mixtapes by Houston's DJ Screw have yet to go to auction, I wouldn't put them too far behind such grand achievements. Screw founded the genre of hip hop music now known as Chopped and Screwed, a slowed down and psychedelic urban form which is now a mainstream aesthetic vis-a-vis recording artists Paul Wall, Mike Jones, Slim Thug, et al. Merging these two disparate forms is 9 Beet Stretch, a sound installation of Beethoven's famed symphony slowed down to stretch over the course of twenty-four hours. Created by Norwegian artist Leif Inge using Snd or Common Lisp Music Software, 9 Beet Stretch will be first exhibited at the Ars Numerica festival in Montbeliard, France from December 14th to the 22nd, before traveling to the Orange County Museum of Art in 2008. For interested parties not local to those to areas, a webcast of the work is running online 24/7. Whether listening for ten minutes or ten hours, the work offers a new temporal sonic space and a touchstone for microtonal enthusiasts. -- David Michael Perez

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Emotional Rationalism

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With the recent opening of the Centre for Contemporary Culture la Strozzina in Florence, the Italian cultural landscape has a new cutting edge institution. Franziska Nori, the Project Director, stresses CCCS 'projects will tackle aspects of town planning, economics, social and political development, the sciences, technology as well as aesthetics and ethics, as contemporary art itself has already broken free of the individual disciplinary approach.' Curated by Nori and scholar Martin Steinhoff, the inaugural exhibition ‘Emotional Systems’ will explore the topic of emotions in light of recent scientific discoveries about the human brain that have proposed that reason and emotion are not two different fields but are interrelated realms. In ‘Mechanics of Emotions’ (1996-05), Maurice Benayoun monitors the multiple queries fed into Internet search engines. Utilizing custom-made software, he cross-references this information against words that illustrate the user’s emotional condition—for example, ‘glad’ and ‘nervous.’ He then creates 3D world maps that render a perspective of people’s feelings globally. A related work is Christian Nold’s ‘Emotional Mapping’ (2007), a device that detects skin tension, thus recording the individual's physical reactions to different stimuli in a given situation. After plotting the data on Google Earth, Nold created a visual chart of what he has called an ‘emotional map of Florence.’ The project will unfold in three parts: an exhibition--on view since Novermber 30--a publication and then a series of public programs that will bring together artists and scientists. Ultimately it will reveal how the two usually separate worlds of the human experience--reason and emotion--are in fact connected to an extent that perhaps only artists can imagine. -- Miguel Amado

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Submissions Invited for Exhibition on www.tank.tv

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tank.tv is looking for lists! Top 100s, 50s, 1000s! Lists of people, animals, minerals, vegetables! Good lists, bad lists and mediocre lists. Lists of anything and everything.

tank.tv is inviting submissions to its forthcoming show, The Whole World, curated by Ian White.

The Whole World is a list of lists: a programme of artists' film and video and an interactive online exhibition.

Both a formal device and a political strategy, film and video that deploys a list as part of its structure often does so with political intent: to subvert hierarchies, to undermine rationalism or to reveal contradiction. In contemporary culture the pop chart's Top 10 has been replaced by an ever-expanding craze for "Top 100s" of everything from Hollywood genres to celebrity gaffes. The Whole World attempts to wrestle back the initiative¦

The Whole World is situated somewhere between the absurd and obsessive enterprises of Flaubert's eponymous characters Bouvard and Pecuchet (they hopelessly collect and explore until, exhausted, they revert to their original jobs as copy clerks) and the Japanese animated game Katamari in which players roll all matter objects, buildings, landscapes, the world itself - into snowballing globes of stuff. The Whole World is ridiculous and irreverent, ambitious and viral.

All are invited to contribute to the programme selected by Ian White by uploading their own video list, be that an extract from an existing work or something made specially for the purpose, to compile a unique, exponential collection: an extraordinary list of lists, of the world as we know it, the whole world.

Submit work via the website or mail mini DV tapes and/or Quicktime files to:
tank.tv
5th Floor
49 - 50 Great Marlborough St
London
W1F 7JR
UK

SUBMISSIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED UNTIL 1st MARCH 2008

Queries and questions to: Alice ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Public Art Commission - The Storey, Lancaster, UK

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Public Art Commission
The Storey, Lancaster, UK

The Storey is a £3m development to bring a grade II listed Victorian building back into use as a hub for the creative industries. It will become a venue for arts activity as well as a home for creative businesses, project partner arts organisations and Lancaster's Tourist Information Centre.

The Storey would like to commission a public artwork that attracts people to an energetic, contemporary and creative centre.

Deadline for expressions of interest is 31 January 2008

To receive a copy of the brief and further information please contact:

Suzanne Dimmock. Public Art and Regenerations Officer, Lancaster City Council
sdimmock@lancaster.gov.uk
Tel: +44(0)1524 582603

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More opportunities via Rhizome at http://rhizome.org/announce/opportunity/

Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Neural Issue 28

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Neural Issue 28, winter 2007:: Subscribe now (and get a free dvd “Mediaterrae vol.1 - Irpinia Electronic Landscape“) or buy it from the closest store. A back issues pack is available. Free: centerfold ‘Muon’ by Chris O’Shea.

new media art: interviews: Florian Cramer interviews Jodi, “For us it’s not an error”; Casey Reas; Glitch explained by Olga Goriounova and Alexei Shulgin; Ant Scott/Beflix; ICC Open Space 2007; news: Morpho Towers, Spamland, The Word’s slowest Instant Messenger, Spy Box, Bloomsday On Twitter; reviews: books/dvd/cd-rom: Gost Storeys, New Media Art, Materializing New Media, Lebensfrische, Monkey_Party.

emusic: Ryoiji Ikeda enexpected errors in Cyclo; Jens Brand interview; news: Uokand (Tapelake), Cut Chemist video scratching the audience, OSCulator, EarthSpeaker, Ex Pharao; reviews: books/dvd/cd+: John Dunca Work 1975-2005, The Topography Of Chance, Elffriede Soundrawing, Camera Lucida, Municipal 44; cd reviews: Andrey Kiritchenko, Merzbow, The Hafler Trio, Yoshio Machida, Test Dept., Quio, Luc Ferrari, Frank Bretschneider, Less-Lethal vol.1, The @C & Vitor Joaquim, Burkhard Stangl / Taku Unami, Mem1, Dunaewsky69, Keene, Minimalismo Italiano, Silicon Scally, Beautiful Schizophonic, The Missing Ensemble, Annea Lockwood, Andy Vaz.

hacktivism: Sebastian Luetgert, the Art of Challenging Copyright; Perry Hoberman, Infringement Series; An Education and Labor Dispatch by Trebor Scholz; news: Interception, Terminal Air, OpeSourceCinema, Dialstation, Missing Persons; reviews: books/dvd/cd-rom: Privacy On The Line, Gamer Theory, Abstract Hacktivism, From Counterculture to Cyberculture, The Class of the New.

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Live Stage: NIME @ Exit Art [NYC]

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NIME @ Exit Art - in collaboration with R. Luke DuBois' 'Algorithmic Composition'class, NYU's Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP) :: December 13, 2007; 7 - 11 pm :: EXIT ART, 475 Tenth Avenue (at 36th Street), New York, NY.

NIME: New Interfaces for Musical Expression - NIME: a graduate course at ITP :: In the sixth annual NIME, students will perform on a series of newly designed electronic instruments that aim to keep the "live" in the live performance of digital music. Presented by ITP instructors Jamie Allen and Gideon D'Arcangelo.

Computer music is usually played with a keyboard and mouse. Laptop musicians often sit at a desk and give performances that are little more than watching someone engage in 'office gestures.'

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Continue reading for full post.

Originally posted on Networked Music Review by jo


The Exploit

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Alex Galloway, in both his art and writing, seems to have made it his mission to expose the cracks in contemporary computer culture. Well-known for hacking his way into games to expose their bugs or glitches, Galloway is also a founding member of the Radical Software Group who, among other projects, produced 'Carnivore' a data surveillance tool that transforms internet traffic into visual art. In addition to his artistic production Galloway's writing has increasingly concerned itself with the fault lines that underlie the base structures of both computer operating systems and networks. In The Exploit: A Theory of Networks (2007), Galloway and coauthor Eugene Thacker explore the political and social implications of these cracks, or what hackers refer to as 'exploits.' In a recent interview with Pau Alsina, Galloway expands on the book's themes, notably the oft deliberated issues of knowledge and power that circumscribe networks. The interview provides some notable quotes: providing a counterpoint to utopian views of the Web 2.0, Galloway posits that 'the web is, in essence, the world's largest sweat shop,' and he describes game art and modifications (that he acknowledges he himself makes) as 'convulsions of formal introspection.' Building upon his previous books, Protocol: How Control Exists After Decentralization (2004) and Gaming: Essays on Algorithmic Culture (2006), The Exploit crystallizes Galloway's interest in digging into the very structures upon which new media art and, increasingly, broader culture is based, and the interview with Alsina should excite readers to take it on. - Caitlin Jones

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