Posts for September 2006

Recursive Instruments

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The Value of Translating the Virtual to the Real

Recursive Instruments is generously supported by Linden Lab through their Fellowship for the Visual and Performing Arts ... The value ascribed to objects, scripts, textures, and land in Second Life contrasts sharply with the value given to similar, material wants. Digital work cannot yet economically compete with comparable real world services. Our initial proposal to Linden Lab investigated these different markets of exchange. The ease of copy and paste undermines traditional economic practice. Without an original--a gold standard--the Linden faces an uphill battle to establish value in the minds of others. We believe that a body of images, objects and ideas exterior to Second Life is of paramount concern for a sustainable environment.

Just as [Simon Spartalian's] words and these slides communicate between you and I, so must Second Life use its content to communicate with culture. Tangible objects can carry a vivid experience outside the world that gave them birth. Our work began at this intersection. Using the Open GL Extractor (OGLE) from OpenLab and EyeBeam Research in NYC we can capture the 3D data behind Second Life. We have a Computerized Numerical Control (CNC) mill for the purpose of carving objects built from this data. Our first construction centered around the landscape of Sheep Island, a Sim which we printed, section by section (acre by acre), into the real world. Read more >> [Related post]

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Light Sensitive Disk Drive

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If you've never found any reason to go to Lancaster, the upcoming Perimeters, Boundaries and Borders might be a good one. The event will present new types of objects, buildings, and products stemming from the increasing use of digital technologies by artists, architects, designers, and others.

The programme is rather yummy. Among the projects exhibited is Light Sensitive Disk Drive, a custom-built LSD Drive able to read lost data on apparently useless CDs. It was designed by Simon Blackmore whom you might remember as one of the developers, together with Antony Hall, of the iLog,

0ligtsensi11.jpg 0lightsen2.jpg

"A CD drive taken from an old PC has been taken apart. The complex motors have been made to function again using hand coded microcontrollers. The laser that reads the data of the CD has been replaced by a light sensor that detects changes in light levels through the disk. By detecting the amount of light that falls through the disk, the drive is able to read the areas of lost data on a disk. This information is sent to a computer as midi data and then processed by a custom program written in the OS software application SuperCollider. The result is a fully functioning piece of computer hardware with accompanying software that allows users to make music with the hands-on process of scratching the disk."

The work was shown at Futuresonic in July, here are the pictures i took at the time. See it at Perimeters, Boundaries and Borders, CityLab, Lancaster (UK), from 29 September - 21 October, 2006. Organised by Fast-uk and folly.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Conference on Literature and the New Media

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Remediating Literature

An international conference on Literature and the new media entitled Re-mediating Literature will take place at Utrecht University (the Netherlands) 4-6 july 2007, with keynote speakers Katherine Hayles, Marie-Laure Ryan, Jan Baetens, and Samuel Weber. Our website features all relevant information concerning the conferencem including the call for papers (deadline is November 6, 2006).

The conference revolves around the following issues: Recent developments in digital and electronic media have stimulated new theoretical reflections on the nature of media as such and on the way in which they evolve across time. The particular aim of this conference is to examine how recent technological changes have affected the 'old' medium of literature.

Multimedial and interactive texts, digitalized archives, cyberpoetics, and technological innovations such as foldable screens: together these have influenced the production and reception of literature, along with the ways in which we think about writing and reading. These ongoing developments call for a critical examination both of the relations between literature and the new media, and of the relations between literary studies and media studies.

The concept of 'remediation' in our title thus has a double thrust. Firstly, it refers to the transformative exchanges that have occurred in the past, and continue to occur, between literature and new media: how has digitilization affected literature as a cultural medium? Secondly, it indicates a relocation of literary studies within the broader field of (new) media studies: how could literary studies profit from the various analytical tools developed in (new) media studies and conversely, how could our understanding of earlier phases in the evolution of the literary medium contribute to our understanding of present developments? By working on both these issues, we hope to locate the place of literature within the milieu of modern media networks and technologies, but also to relocate ...

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


On collaboration

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Statement of Purpose, E.A.T., 1967 Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T.) Statement of Purpose, 1967

John Cage: "If the artist can become aware of the technology, and if the technologist can become aware of the fact that the show must go on, then I think we can expect not only interesting art, but we may just very well expect an interesting change in social order. The most important aspect of this is the position of the engineer as a possible revolutionary figure. And it may very well come as a result of the artists and engineers collaborating, because the artists, for years now, have been the repository of revolutionary thought, whereas the engineers, in their recent history, have been the employees of the economic life. But in relating to the artist, they become related to a revolutionary factor..."

Billy Kluver: "Together the artist and the engineer went one stop beyond what either of them could have done separately. But perhaps more importantly, the artist-engineer collaboration was the training ground for larger-scale involvement in social issues for both the artist and the engineer."


I've never quite understood what Cage means whenever he talks about the "revolutionary" ethos and actions of artists, especially if this relies on art being extra-economic, and I hear it regurgitated (like academics with Deleuze) by too many artists today, but I do believe that both he and Kluver are onto something valuable when they narrow in on the potential of collaborating as a force for social change.

I especially like the implication of political collaboration. Rather than the hippie-utopian dream of everyone holding hands and working/playing together productively, their call for a re-ordering of things conjures images in my head of shaven-head French women after the war. So many boundaries crossed that the powers-that-be snap to attention, fiercely ...

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Originally posted on Purse Lip Square Jaw by Anne


MAPQUEST @ PS122 Gallery

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PS122 Gallery and artwurl.org are pleased to present MAPQUEST, an exhibition of works by artists, activists, writers and organizers, involved in experimentation with critical and dissident cartography. The exhibition examines various mapping strategies employed as response to specific social and political issues, and includes contributions by Lize Mogel and Dario Azzellini, Center for Urban Pedagogy, Ewen Chardronnet, The Friends of William Blake, [Conflux 2006 participant] Ryan Griffis/Temporary Travel Office, Ashley Hunt, Lasse Lau, Nadxieli Mannello, and Gregory Sholett.  MAPQUEST runs from September 16 - October 9, 2006 at the PS122 Gallery in NYC.

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Originally posted on Glowlab by Rhizome


Practicing Everyday Life

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This week, the Glowlab Collective's third annual Conflux festival hits the streets of Brooklyn, offering four full days of psychogeographic celebration. The participants in the Conflux explore contemporary urban life through exhibits, screenings, performances, talks, workshops, and happenings. Don't miss Adam Greenfield's talk about how information technologies are transforming our relationships to place, and the first performance of a new project by Mark Tribe wherein he remakes historic protest speeches from 1960s and early 70s. If you feel the urge to engage in a little psychogeographic drifting through the city, keep your eyes open for Michele Gambetta's RIDER project, a mobile art gallery in the back of a rented Ryder truck, and the graffiti walking tour and street party that will be thrown by Graffiti Research Lab and Jake Dobkin of Streetsy.com. If you're ready to take guerilla gardening to the next level, participate in Mark Shepard's Tactical Sound Garden workshop, where you'll learn how to use Wi-Fi access points to plant a publicly available soundscape of your own design. Bring all of your nerd gear to ShiftSpace.org's laptop party, where Mushon Zer-Aviv and Dan Phiffer will be on hand to solicit your contribution to the construction of an online public space. Over seventy-five creative minds from around the world will be presenting their transformations of the urban environment, so drift on over to Conflux and have your curiosity piqued and imagination engaged. - Michelle Kasprzak

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Practicing Everyday Life

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This week, the Glowlab Collective's third annual Conflux festival hits the streets of Brooklyn, offering four full days of psychogeographic celebration. The participants in the Conflux explore contemporary urban life through exhibits, screenings, performances, talks, workshops, and happenings. Don't miss Adam Greenfield's talk about how information technologies are transforming our relationships to place, and the first performance of a new project by Mark Tribe wherein he remakes historic protest speeches from 1960s and early 70s. If you feel the urge to engage in a little psychogeographic drifting through the city, keep your eyes open for Michele Gambetta's RIDER project, a mobile art gallery in the back of a rented Ryder truck, and the graffiti walking tour and street party that will be thrown by Graffiti Research Lab and Jake Dobkin of Streetsy.com. If you're ready to take guerilla gardening to the next level, participate in Mark Shepard's Tactical Sound Garden workshop, where you'll learn how to use Wi-Fi access points to plant a publicly available soundscape of your own design. Bring all of your nerd gear to ShiftSpace.org's laptop party, where Mushon Zer-Aviv and Dan Phiffer will be on hand to solicit your contribution to the construction of an online public space. Over seventy-five creative minds from around the world will be presenting their transformations of the urban environment, so drift on over to Conflux and have your curiosity piqued and imagination engaged. - Michelle Kasprzak

http://www.confluxfestival.org

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org: Rhizome News by Rhizome


Vertical Features Remix - Curt Cloninger

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Vertical Features Remix
Vertical Features Remix (2006, 5.35MB, 1:01 min)

Faux collaboration with Tulse Luper whereby I remix his notes for
Vertical Features according to the notes themselves.

br /> watercolors by Peter Greenaway.
audio by My Bloody Valentine.

peace
from curt.

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Originally posted on DVblog by doron golan


Oscillating light kinetics.

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Imagine a physical sculptural version of a dynamical system in 3d space or a complex particle simulation, the kind that appears as a floating gas vapour. Using a technique called 'chromastrobic light' Paul Friedlander conjures spectacular light sculptures that are the ultimate incarnation of the late 60's light-show aesthetic bought into the now. They also site nicely in the lineage of waveform art - everything from early artist experiments with oscilloscopes -- Laposky, Whitney, Bute et al to recent computational art concerning attractors, particles and Bezier acrobatics.

The work 'Dark Matter' appears as a 3 dimensional iridescent waveform, the result of chromastrobic light projected onto a rapidly spinning rope reflected off a Mylar mirror (flexible mirror surface). Because the rope spins at up to 600 rpm the human eye perceives a three dimensional multicoloured image. It doesn't stop there - spectators can interact with the piece via two high frequency sound beams which alter the speed of the rope's vibrations and the colour of the light.

Freidlander's most recent installation, Timeless Universe concerns itself with the alternative cosmological ideas of English physicist Julian Barbour. 10 different kinetic pieces are arranged in groups illuminated by projections showing images from 3 different computers all generating real-time animations that modify, modulate and transform the chosen subject matter.

Its comes as no surprise that Friedlander was an acolyte of the original psychedelic light shows scene the first time round - he built his first light sculptures while a physics student at the University of Sussex before graduating in 1972.

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Originally posted on dataisnature.com by Rhizome


The Upgrade! Johannesburg and WSOA Digital Arts present: Andre SC

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andre sc @ upgrade! joburg

More info, via The Upgrade! Johannesburg:

TECHNOGRAFFI: Drawing the pixel curtain

In /*technoGraffi* - drawing the pixel curtain/, André SC will show and discuss some of his recent ‘stuff’ involving generative procedures, pseudo neuro-biological theory, ridiculous amounts of pornography, ‘post-digital abstraction’ as well as ‘netVerse’ - the current interactive online project that N. Stern describes as “a noteworthy feat …a cross between fridge magnet poetry, geeky guy gluttony, snot flinging, and surrealist games…”

New media manipulator (read pixel-maniac), André SC a.k.a. Clements completed a BA at the University of Pretoria in ‘95. Since then he has been a designer, corporate consultant, experimental artist,  studied some more stuff and lectures in Media Design Technology. He is the web-editor/developer of davidkrutpublishing.com and keeps a  personal blog site at pixelplexus.co.za. also see his net.art project, netverse.

links:

http://www.davidkrutpublishing.com
http://www.pixelplexus.co.za
http://netverse.andresc.net

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Originally posted on nathaniel and the non-aggressive by Rhizome