Posts for October 2006

New Media, Modern Twist

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According to the New York Times:

The Museum of Modern Art announced yesterday that it had created a new curatorial department to focus exclusively on the growing number of contemporary artworks that use sound and moving images in gallery installations. The media department, once part of the department of film and media, will deal with works that use a wide range of modern technology, from video and digital imagery to Internet-based art and sound-only pieces, said Klaus Biesenbach, who was named chief curator of the new department. Mr. Biesenbach, who has been a MoMA curator since 2004 and the chief curator of P.S. 1, the museum's Queens affiliate, since 2002, said that works relying on media techniques and ideas of conveying motion and time had become much more prominent over the last two decades at international art fairs and exhibitions.'And it's even more visible now,' he said. 'I think artistic practice is evolving, and so museums are evolving as well.' The creation of the new department brings the number of curatorial departments at the museum to seven. The other six are architecture and design, drawings, film, painting and sculpture, photography, and prints and illustrated books.



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Originally posted on Professor VJ by Rhizome


Flashy Detective Work

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Anyone who has ever visited a major art fair knows that the conditions under which the works are presented have a very strong impact on their interpretation. This includes not only the architectural site selected for reincarnation as an art mall, but also the lifestyle associated with fairs: namely, late nights. It is fitting, then, that the narrator of YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES' newest Flash-based text art piece would be an insomniac. You see, the piece was commissioned by the Tate and its launch coincided with the launch of this month's Frieze Contemporary Art Fair, also in London. 'The Art of Sleep' is the newest web-based work by this Korea-based artist duo whose use of film noir plot conventions extends to jazzy soundtracks and fonts reminiscent of the detective's typewriter. Even the narrator's commentary is textbook noir, in its hazy recollections and foggy declarations about the nature of 'the international contemporary art market from the artists' perspective.' The animation is just over eighteen minutes long and, by the end, the reader becomes the ultimate detective, piecing together an interpretation based on discreet, if humorous, bits of evidence. - Elizabeth Johnston

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Flashy Detective Work

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Anyone who has ever visited a major art fair knows that the conditions under which the works are presented have a very strong impact on their interpretation. This includes not only the architectural site selected for reincarnation as an art mall, but also the lifestyle associated with fairs: namely, late nights. It is fitting, then, that the narrator of YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES' newest Flash-based text art piece would be an insomniac. You see, the piece was commissioned by the Tate and its launch coincided with the launch of this month's Frieze Contemporary Art Fair, also in London. 'The Art of Sleep' is the newest web-based work by this Korea-based artist duo whose use of film noir plot conventions extends to jazzy soundtracks and fonts reminiscent of the detective's typewriter. Even the narrator's commentary is textbook noir, in its hazy recollections and foggy declarations about the nature of 'the international contemporary art market from the artists' perspective.' The animation is just over eighteen minutes long and, by the end, the reader becomes the ultimate detective, piecing together an interpretation based on discreet, if humorous, bits of evidence. - Elizabeth Johnston

http://www.tate.org.uk/netart/artofsleep/

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org: Rhizome News by Rhizome


GameScenes

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GAMESC~1.png

Art in the Age of Videogames

Video and computer game technologies have opened up new possibilities for artistic creation, distribution, and appreciation. In addition to projects that might conventionally be described as Internet Art, Digital Art or New Media Art, there is now a wide spectrum of work by practitioners that crosses the boundaries between various disciplines and practices. The common denominator is that all these practitioners use digital games as their tools or source of inspiration to make art. They are called Game Artists.

GameScenes explores the rapidly expanding world of Game Art in the works of over 30 international artists. Included are several milestones in this field, as well as some lesser known works. In addition to the editors' critical texts, the book contains contributions from a variety of international scholars that illustrate, explain, and contextualize the various artifacts.

ARTISTS: AES+F, Cory Arcangel, Aram Bartholl, Dave Beck, Tobias Bernstrup, Nick Bertke, John Paul Bichard, Marco Cadioli, Mauro Ceolin, Brody Condon, Joseph DeLappe, Delire (Julian Oliver), Todd Deutsch, Micah Ganske, Beate Geissler − Oliver Sann, Brent Gustafson, Jon Haddock, Margarete Jahrmann − Max Moswitzer, JODI, Joan Leandre, Miltos Manetas, Alison Mealey, Mark McCarthy, Shusha Niederberger, Nullpointer (Tom Betts), Nullsleep (Jeremiah Johnson), Totto Renna, RSG (feat. Alexander Galloway), Anne-Marie Schleiner, Eddo Stern, Palle Torsson, UBERMORGEN.COM.

AUTHORS: Matteo Bittanti, Rebecca Cannon, Pierluigi Casolari, Maia
Engeli, Henry Lowood, Sally O'Reilly, Domenico Quaranta, Philippa Stalker, Valentina Tanni.

Text in English and Italian.

Downloadable texts:

Matteo Bittanti: Game Art (Intro): www.gamescenes.org/images/GameArt_eng.pdf
Domenico Quaranta: Game Aesthetics (Outro):
www.gamescenes.org/images/Game_aesthetics_eng.pdf
Valentina Tanni: Geissler ��� Sann: Shooter:
www.gamescenes.org/images/Tanni_shooter_eng.pdf

More information:

Gamescenes.org: http://www.gamescenes.org/
Videoludica.game culture: http://www.videoludica.com/news.php?category=9

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Riot Gear for Rollartista: Mobile Gaming Performance

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Anne-Marie:

Riot Gear for Rollartista *Version en espa=F1ol abajo*
A blog and mobile gaming performance project by
Anne-Marie Schleiner opensorcery@opensorcery.net
and Talice Lee talice@talicelee.net<mailto:talice@talicelee.net>

This blog is for posting information about a
performance action we are doing in Castellon,
Spain on Saturday October 21, 2006 as part of an
exhibition at EACC Espai d=92Art Contemporani de
Castell=F3 from October-January 2007. It will
involve three short Machinima (stories told with
video game footage) videos that will be beamed
from an ultra-light projector stapped to one of
our head helmets. (The videos are now linked from
the blog to YouTube.) We sampled the two
Playstation games Narc and MechWarrior. It sort
of evolved into a violent (break) dance musical
and each video is dedicated to an African or
Muslim immigrant who was seriously abused by
police in Spain or France. We, two American women
in padded anime/riot gear/something else inspired
moda, will be holding Playstation controllers and
rollerskating at the same time, (and sometimes
dancing), while we coast around projecting onto surfaces of the city.

After the performance/action we will also post
documentation videos and photos on the blog at:
http://blog.myspace.com/rollartista

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Anne-Marie


global rich list

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globalrichlist.jpg
a simple online infographic diagram showing how rich you are relative to the global earth population, as estimated by your annual income.

see also world population one & miniature earth.

[link: globalrichlist.com]

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Originally posted on information aesthetics by Rhizome


RHIZOME TURNS 10!

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This week, Rhizome launched our Tenth Anniversary Festival of Art & Technology, in celebration of our own growth and ongoing advancements in the field of new media art. Ten years after our birth as a net art-related email discussion list, Rhizome has grown into a full-fledged membership organization with a variety of programs and services for the broader community. The Festival includes a seven-month season of exhibits, performances, talks, and other events, and two of its major components are web-based. 'Times Shares' is a series of online exhibitions co-presented with the New Museum of Contemporary Art to underscore our ongoing commitment to internet-based art. The collaborative writing project, 'Keylines,' is a site at which readers can chat and post essays about topics of importance to the field. It's already been 'seeded' with essays by a number of actively engaged writers and we're eager for you to join us in the discussion. Meanwhile, we thank you for your support. - Rhizome.org

http://www.rhizome.org/events/tenyear/

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


We Don’t Expect the NEA to Fund Your Robot

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A new group of digital maquettes for 'america jesus tOrture,' Joseph Nechvatal's recent series of paintings, is now online. Nechavatal's paitings are acrylic on canvas, created with digital assisstance and, in this case, incorporate images from the Abu Graib photographs. Images of some of his other computer-robotic assisted paitings have been published in Drunken Boat. More can be seen on Nechvatal's site.

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Originally posted on Grand Text Auto by nick


lord of the flies

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Originally posted on John Michael Boling by Rhizome


New Media Poetics Meet New LEA Interface Design

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Great news digital poetry sports fans. LEA (Leonardo Electronic Almanac) has a new online look, complete with downloadable .pdf files, and the inaugural issue contained within the new interface is focused on "New Media Poetics and Poetry":

"In the new media environment, we deal with an expanded notion of "poem" as praxis of surface level and sub-textual computer code levels, and an expanded awareness of the digital poem as process. The reading and reception of this writing occurs in a networked context, in which the reader becomes an "ergodic" participant (to use Espen Aarseth's term) and helps shape the form of the new media poem," defines New Media Poetics and Poetry issue guest editor Tim Peterson.

Peterson has woven together a marvelous mix featuring Loss Pequeno Glazier, John Cayley with Dimitri Lemmerman, Lori Emerson, Phillippe Bootz, Manuel Portela, Stephanie Strickland, Mez, Maria Engberg and Matthias Hillner. Don't forget to scurry over to the equally exciting gallery, exhibiting works by Jason Nelson, Aya Karpinska, Daniel Canazon Howe, mIEKAL aND, CamillE BacoS, Nadine Hilbert and Gast Bouschet. For the first time also, be mesmerized by Mathias Hillner and Augusto de Campos' Shockwave creations.
Do these essays and artworks foretell a growth spurt in electronic literature within the academy? Like experimental creative writing and alternative '70s-styled art before it, will e-lit find refuge in the hallowed halls of the leaking institutions?

It's already happened big time with diigital / new media art. Where are all of the fully supported, internationally visible electronic writing / new media studies programs?



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Originally posted on Professor VJ by Rhizome