Posts for October 2006

submidialogy#2

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  <p><img alt="sub.jpg" src="http://www.turbulence.org/blog/archives/sub.jpg" width="150" height="50" border="0" style="float: left; margin: 0px 5px 5px 0px"; /><h4>4 days of studies and debates about theories and practices of brazilian digital media </h4></p><p></p>


"what we really want, actually, is that the ideas become dangerous again"


The first Submidialogy conference, that took place in Campinas, Sao Paulo, in October 2005, was derived of cooperation between India, Netherlands and diverse Brazilian groups. It was a joining of independent projects, the third sector, governmental, artistic and experimental to an international network of collaborators, searching above all to bring these different experiences to the acknowledgment. This year, it becomes an open festival, with lectures, production laboratories, fm radio broadcast, television, the Internet and the delicious chat with cacha among @ll submiditics.

Submidialogy will aggregate talks, production and collaborative learning, as well as music, free radio, vj and independent media. These are some of the typical 'tastes' that could be appreciated - without moderation - during the second edition of the conference.

Another characteristic of this festival is to investigate the social, cultural and political possibilities of the digital media, besides fomenting the dialogue (in)existent between theory - the scope of ideas, and the practices - the scope of actions.

As much subject as much format are still under construction, but are suspended in the convergence among culture, communication, resistance, re-signification, media, technology, art and tactics. In the construction page and by the dicussion list, you can take part of it. We invite you to help to organize this subversion and thus to share our ideas in different contexts and times, aiming future perspective, exchange of experiences, concepts, critical production and, mainly, fun.


  <p>If you wish to take part of this mess, sign ...

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Originally posted on artificialeyes.tv reblog by Rhizome


Scape 2006 Biennial of Art in Public Space

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scapepng.png

/don't misbehave!/

Scape 2006 Biennial of Art in Public Space /don't misbehave!/ in New Zealand presents 4 new media based artworks:

The group SIMPEL contributes Paper Cup Telephone Network (PCTN). Do you remember stringing two cups together and talking with your friend? Well, the PCTN is the same, but imagine people around the world whose cups are all tied together, so that everyone can speak to anyone, any time, for free. The PCTN uses a combination of string and internet technologies to create a free and open communication system similar to Antonio Meucci's (the inventor of the telephone) vision for the telephone, a social network where everyone speaks to everyone. This project is by the new media art group SIMPEL. SIMPEL is Matthew Biederman (CA), Aleksandar Erkalovic (HR), Lotte Meijer (NL), and Adam Hyde (NZ). Forecourt of Christchurch Art Gallery and south quad of Arts Centre.

Auckland based media artist Sean Kerr installs Neighbourhood Watch. Neighbourhood Watch consists of a number of peering eyes which create an inquisitive neighbourhood in the central urban area of Christchurch, unsettling and interrupting the locals in the surrounding environment. These animated eyes are goggling out of windows, observing the ever-changing scenery of Christchurch's streets, and participating in public commentary. Worcester Boulevard.

Swiss artist Johannes Gees will make you see The Christchurch Menetekel. The work is a collaborative, interactive laser text installation inspired by the story of King Belshazzar/s feast, from the biblical Book of Daniel. Taking its cue from the flaming Hand of God and its mysterious warning in the story, Menetekel writes messages on walls in laser light and invites the public to text their own contributions and responses back. The artwork addresses the public's relationship with religion and its meaning in contemporary art and society. 30 ...

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Exhibition: The Austrian Abstracts

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The Austrian Abstracts
22.09.-15.10.2006, Arti et Amicitiae, Amsterdam

The Austrian Abstracts is an exhibition of 27 Austrian-based artists, collected through their concerns with principles of abstraction while working in a wide range of media, from software to sculpture and painting. The show continues the investigation from the 2003 Abstraction Now at the Künstlerhaus in Vienna, with several of the artists appearing in both.

As the title implies, the Austrian art scene forms a nexus for the show. Even though the participating artists are from different countries, many of them are based in Vienna or have a special connection to Austria. However, the point of the exhibition is not to establish a patriotic position. Rather, it takes as its starting point a renewed interest in abstract art, which could be clearly observed in the Austrian scene of the last 10 years or more.

As the work in the exhibition demonstrates, the new interest in abstraction became evident in work with video and digital media. From the mid-1990’s artists like Dextro, Lia, Tina Frank etc. began experimenting with code, creating mostly web-based works that dealt with generative systems. These works became popular with net audiences at the time, and were loosely seen as related to net.art even though they essentially were formal investigations. Gradually these works became recognized as a coherent movement, and many of the artists involved have since expanded beyond the web to work with installations etc.

This movement has been given the de facto title “Austrian Abstracts”, deriving from a series of screening programs of digital experimental video that first gathered many of the artists in the current exhibition. Counting Abstraction Now, the show at Arti et Amicitiae is thus the third manifestation ...

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Global Criticism, Served Brazilian Style

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Given that the majority of exchanges among artists making media-based work now have a global scope, it may seem arbitrary to define aesthetics or sensibilities in geographical terms. But 'Interconnect @ Between Attention and Immersion: Media Art from Brazil,' a large survey of work by fifteen Brazilian artists on view through October 29 at ZKM in Karlsruhe, Germany, makes a strong case for important regional similarities persisting in Brazil's recent media art. The show features work by finalists for the prestigious Premio Sergio Motta de Arte e Tecnologia, including Raquel Kogan, Simone Michellin, and Andre Parente. While diverse in subject and execution, much of the work demonstrates a common interest in an increasingly hybrid media landscape visible on a global level--as in television overlaping with information networks and architecture bleeding into video. At the same time, most of the work also traces where that churning landscape intersects with everyday social and political life, offering criticisms of global media that consider its impact on the changing social milieu in both the local gallery and, in several cases, back in Brazil. In fact, that firmly-rooted criticality may be the strongest connection among the works on view, and it could also be the show's biggest contribution to global media debates. - Bill Hanley

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Global Criticism, Served Brazilian Style

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Given that the majority of exchanges among artists making media-based work now have a global scope, it may seem arbitrary to define aesthetics or sensibilities in geographical terms. But 'Interconnect @ Between Attention and Immersion: Media Art from Brazil,' a large survey of work by fifteen Brazilian artists on view through October 29 at ZKM in Karlsruhe, Germany, makes a strong case for important regional similarities persisting in Brazil's recent media art. The show features work by finalists for the prestigious Premio Sergio Motta de Arte e Tecnologia, including Raquel Kogan, Simone Michellin, and Andre Parente. While diverse in subject and execution, much of the work demonstrates a common interest in an increasingly hybrid media landscape visible on a global level--as in television overlaping with information networks and architecture bleeding into video. At the same time, most of the work also traces where that churning landscape intersects with everyday social and political life, offering criticisms of global media that consider its impact on the changing social milieu in both the local gallery and, in several cases, back in Brazil. In fact, that firmly-rooted criticality may be the strongest connection among the works on view, and it could also be the show's biggest contribution to global media debates. - Bill Hanley

http://on1.zkm.de/zkm/stories/storyReader$5236

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


Musical Nodes

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Turbulence has just launched a beautiful and resonant new piece by Jason Freeman, with Patricia Reed and Maja Cerar. “Graph Theory” allows the interactor to take an open walk on a connected graph of violin vertices, and to influence future live performances of this piece, as the description of this piece explains:

“Graph Theory” seeks to connect composition, listening, and concert performance by coupling an acoustic work for solo violin or solo cello to an interactive web site. On the web site, users navigate among sixty-one short, looping musical fragments to create their own unique path through the composition. The navigation choices which users make affect future concert performances of the work. Before each performance, the soloist prints out a new copy of the score from the web site. That score presents her with a fixed path through the piece; the order of the fragments is influenced by the decisions that recent web site visitors have made. · “Graph Theory” is a 2006 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc., (aka Ether-Ore) for its Turbulence web site. It was made possible with funding from The Greenwall Foundation.

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Originally posted on Grand Text Auto by nick


Turbulence Commission:

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Graph Theory

Turbulence Commission: Graph Theory by Jason Freeman, with Patricia Reed and Maja Cerar :: [needs Macromedia Flash Player plugin; Internet Explorer 5+, Mozilla Firefox 1.5.0+, or Safari 1.0+]

"Graph Theory" seeks to connect composition, listening, and concert performance by coupling an acoustic work for solo violin or solo cello to an interactive web site. On the web site, users navigate among sixty-one short, looping musical fragments to create their own unique path through the composition. The navigation choices which users make affect future concert performances of the work. Before each performance, the soloist prints out a new copy of the score from the web site. That score presents her with a fixed path through the piece; the order of the fragments is influenced by the decisions that recent web site visitors have made.

"Graph Theory" is a 2006 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. (aka Ether-Ore) for its Turbulence web site. It was made possible with funding from The Greenwall Foundation.

BIOGRAPHIES

JASON FREEMAN'S works break down conventional barriers between composers, performers, and listeners, using new technology and unconventional notation to turn audiences and musicians into compositional collaborators. His music has been performed by the American Composers Orchestra, Speculum Musicae, the So Percussion Group, the Nieuw Ensemble, Le Nouvel Ensemble Moderne, and Evan Ziporyn; and his interactive installations and software art have been exhibited at the Lincoln Center Festival, the Boston CyberArts Festival, and the Transmediale Festival and featured in the New York Times and on National Public Radio. N.A.G. (Network Auralization for Gnutella) (2003), a commission from Turbulence.org, was described by Billboard as "an example of the web's mind-expanding possibilities." Freeman received his B.A. in music from Yale University and his M.A. and D.M.A ...

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


the Upgrade! Johannesburg presents our first Panel Discussion: Collecting Digits

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nathaniel stern:

Friday October 6, 2006 @ 3pm: Panel Discussion: Collecting Digits WSOA Digital Arts. Map: http://digitalarts.wits.ac.za/artworks/ contact/map.htm

The Upgrade! Johannesburg presents our first Panel Discussion:
Collecting Digits

This panel and discussion on the possibilities and problems with
collecting new media art will include presentations by:

* Warren Siebrits - founder of one of Johannesburg's most
prestigious contemporary and modern commercial art galleries * Franci Cronje - curator of several collections & competitions,
including Sasol New Signatures * Nathaniel Stern - digital and interactive artist, in several
public & private collections * Clive Kellner - Director of the Johannesburg Art Museum

http://warrensiebrits.co.za/ http://nathanielstern.com/blog/franci-cronje/ http://nathanielstern.com/ http://www.joburg.org.za/2004/sep/sep10_jag.stm

About Upgrade! Johannesburg About once per month a group of new media students, artists and
curators gather in Johannesburg, South Africa. At each meeting one or
two artists present work - theirs, or a favorite's - in order to
foster critique, dialogue and collaboration in our growing digital
arts scene. The Upgrade! Joburg grew out of Professor Christo
Doherty's (WSOA Digital Arts; Map ) regular Friday 'Digital Soirees'
at Wits School of the Arts, and artist Nathaniel Stern's atjoburg
initiative, both founded between 2002/3 and still ongoing. They
wanted to invite a larger, participative audience into their space,
and be plugged into a more diverse and international network. Our
first official Upgrade! featured Daniel Hirschmann, a South African
Wits alumnus who alsostudied at NYU's Interactive Telecommunications
Program, and went on to help shape the Physical Computing studio at
Fabrica. At number two, Stern presented MTAA's brilliant work
remotely (with their permission), rather fitting given their initial
involvement in the first NYC Upgrades....

http://atjoburg.net/upgrade/index.html

nathaniel http://nathanielstern.com

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by nathaniel stern


JODI this Thursday @ Conversations At The Edge!

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// jonCates:

JODI: MAX PAYNE CHEATS ONLY! Joan Heemskerk and Dirk Paesmans in person! Max Payne Cheats Only (1996–2005, Netherlands, ca. 60 min) THURSDAY OCTOBER 5 @ 6:00 PM Gene Siskel Film Center 164 N. State CHI IL .US $ 9 USD $ 5 USD for Film Center members $ 7 USD for students

On Thursday, October 5 at 6pm at the Gene Siskel Film Center,
Conversations at the Edge will present digital art pioneers JODI
(Joan Heemskerk and Dirk Paesmans) in a rare public demonstration of
their latest video game modifications, including Max Payne Cheats
Only (2005)

http://maxpaynecheatsonly.jodi.org

along with their ground-breaking modifications of Quake 1, Untitled
Game (1996–2001)

http://www.untitled-game.org

id Software’s game Wolfenstein 3D, SOD (1999)

http://sod.jodi.org

and the early ’80s game Jet Set Willy, Jet Set Willy Variations ©
1984 (2002)

http://jetsetwilly.jodi.org

Digital provocateurs JODI pioneered Web art in the mid-1990s,
upending the conventions of the emerging medium to create anarchic
programs that simulated computer crashes, viruses, and error
messages. The duo has wrought similar havoc on computer programs and
video games, radically disrupting the language of these systems— including interfaces, commands, errors, and code—to subvert the
relationship between computer technology and its users. About JODI
cont. JODI's works are typically seen online. Their recent solo
exhibitions include INSTALL.EXE at Eyebeam, New York, which toured to
Basel and to BuroFriedrich, Berlin; and the Computing 101B exhibition
at FACT Centre, Liverpool, England. Their works have also been
exhibited at the Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow; Kunstverein
Bonn; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Zentrum fur Kunst und
Medientechnologie, Karlsruhe, Germany; and Documenta X, Kassel,
Germany, among others.

http://jodi.org

JODI: Max Payne Cheats Only is co-presented by Conversations at the
Edge (a program organized by the Department ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by // jonCates


Robot painters

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(Via Laurent): Leonel Moura is an artist interested in robot painters. For instance, there is this Robotic Action Painter:

RAP is a new generation of painting robots designed for Museum or long exhibition displays. It is completely autonomous and needs very little assistance and maintenance.
RAP creates it’s own paintings based on an artificial intelligence algorithm, it decides when the work is ready and signs in the right bottom corner with its distinctive signature.
The algorithm combines initial randomness, positive feedback and a positive/negative increment of ‘color as pheromone’ mechanism based on a grid of nine RGB sensors.
Also the ’sense of rightness’ - to determine when the painting is ready - is achieved not by any linear method, time or sum, but through a kind of pattern recognition system.

te is certainly the “The Iconoclast Robot” by Leonel Moura (presented at SHIFT 2006):

Why do I blog this? autonomous activity created by robots is interesting to observe, what happens when “machines that decide what to do for themselves”? This kind of principe is used in AI (problem-solving…) and now it’s more and more common to let robots draw. Besides, the look of the iconoclast robot is superb.

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Originally posted on pasta and vinegar by Nicolas