Posts for November 2006

:::::: new video-interviews in Artnodes ::::

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Artnodes publishes a new series of interviews with international experts in digital art and culture

Artnodes, the UOC'�s internet space on the interrelations between art, science and technology, is to publish six new interviews with international experts on digital art, which are to remain on the website permanently. This series of interviews reflects on some of the hottest issues in digital art and culture, including surveillance technology, the effects of software on our daily lives and virtual reality communities.

On this occasion, the experts interviewed are Erkki Huhtamo (Associate Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles), Andreas Broeckmann (artistic director of Transmediale), Alex Galloway (programmer and Professor of digital media at New York University), Jonah Brucker-Cohen (digital artist and researcher), David Rokeby (digital artist) and Marc Downie (artist and artificial intelligence researcher).

These experts discuss issues such as the effects of software on our daily lives, the development of media archaeology, surveillance technology in artistic projects, physical toy interfaces linked to surveillance software, connected virtual reality communities and the creation of sound by virtual reality creatures.

The interviews and videos, made by Pau Alsina (Professor at UOC), Alba Colombo (Berlinale) and Pau Waelder (Artactiva), will remain on Artnodes permanently. Artnodes usually publishes documents to inspire theoretical reflection on or historical study of this field of interdisciplinary creativity.

The Artnodes area
Artnodes is an area on the Open University of Catalonia�s network dedicated to the interrelations of art, science and technology. The Artnodes area includes an academic journal, a specialist information and documentation portal and projects such as LABS or YASMIN in collaboration. Since 2003, it has organised face-to-face and virtual events relating to digital art and other intersections between art, science and technology.

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Originally posted on Nettime-ann relay by nettime-ann


Collecting New Media Art

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neme.org:

"[New media art] questions everything, the most fundamental assumptions: What is a work? How do you collect? What is preservation? What is ownership? All of those things that museums are based upon and structured upon are pretty much thrown open to question."
Jeremy Strick, Director, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

In this comment, Jeremy Strick is both correct and being rhetorical. Lots of contemporary art raises these same questions. New media art, particularly in its network-based incarnations, does so perhaps more consistently, but none of the questions raised is radically new. In fact, one of the results of institutions' early investigations of collecting new media, the Variable Media Initiative, is significant precisely because of its cross-medium applicability. Nevertheless, there is a kind of crisis of collection - and hence cultural memory - because of the paucity of work in museum collections and the nature of new media art, which makes it difficult to recover adequately past a certain point.

It is fair to say that even among the few museums that have relatively active curatorial efforts in new media, none has a collection that even approaches the scope of its holdings in other media that its exhibits. At the same time, since at least 1997 when Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz first presented their Satellite Arts Project, and certainly since the invention of the World Wide Web in the early 90s, there has been an explosion of artistic new media activity, as is well documented on a website such as Rhizome or the archives of the Ars Electronica Festival, which presented for its 25th year in 2004.

Why? What accounts for this discrepancy between artistic activity and institutional collecting?


New article by Steve Dietz published in NeMe http://www.neme.org on http://neme.org/main/524/collecting-new-media-art

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by neme.org


Virtually Unheard Of Opportunity

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Artist residencies are hard to come by. This is especially true for those who work in new media, or who live in remote geographic regions. The offering of space to work, let alone funding or an exhibition, is a rare gem coveted by working artists. Add to this context a lack of restraint, with regard to the physical mass of the artist's work, gravity, or a materials budget, and one would guess that they were in dreamland. Close enough... Ars Virtua is a nonprofit art space inside of the online 'massively multiplayer' game world of Second Life. They've recently put out a call for artists to apply for 11-week residencies that offer cash funding (not just Second Life's Linden dollars), virtual work space, and an exhibition within their increasingly popular gallery. According to this call, 'residents will be encouraged to explore, experiment with, and challenge traditional conventions of art making and distribution, value and the art market, artist and audience, space and place.' This experimentation is supported by Ars Virtua's own efforts to blur the boundary between synthetic, digital 3D spaces and the curatorial context associated with working in 'real' physical space. Artists of all backgrounds are encouraged to create a Second Life avatar and apply for the residencies before November 21st. - Angela Moreno

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Virtually Unheard Of Opportunity

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Artist residencies are hard to come by. This is especially true for those who work in new media, or who live in remote geographic regions. The offering of space to work, let alone funding or an exhibition, is a rare gem coveted by working artists. Add to this context a lack of restraint, with regard to the physical mass of the artist's work, gravity, or a materials budget, and one would guess that they were in dreamland. Close enough... Ars Virtua is a nonprofit art space inside of the online 'massively multiplayer' game world of Second Life. They've recently put out a call for artists to apply for 11-week residencies that offer cash funding (not just Second Life's Linden dollars), virtual work space, and an exhibition within their increasingly popular gallery. According to this call, 'residents will be encouraged to explore, experiment with, and challenge traditional conventions of art making and distribution, value and the art market, artist and audience, space and place.' This experimentation is supported by Ars Virtua's own efforts to blur the boundary between synthetic, digital 3D spaces and the curatorial context associated with working in 'real' physical space. Artists of all backgrounds are encouraged to create a Second Life avatar and apply for the residencies before November 21st. - Angela Moreno

http://arsvirtua.com/residence.html

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org: Rhizome News by Rhizome


The GIF show

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gif show

I'm in my first real show! With a whole bunch of awesome awesome people! This is really exciting... Marisa Olson (who's curating the show) put up a post with all the info, but I'll summarize: It opens Wednesday, May 3rd at RX Gallery in San Francisco. The other artists in the show are Cory Arcangel, Peter Baldes, Michael Bell-Smith, Jimpunk, Olia Lialina, Abe Linkoln, Lovid, Tom Moody, Paper Rad, Paul Slocum, and Matt Smear (aka 893/umeancompetitor). And it's all about GIFs! And Marisa made a zany Myspace profile for the show, YES!

Marisa says:

Everyone's showing GIFs, and some are also showing videos, works on paper, sound, and other cool related stuff. Together, their work shows the diversity of forms to be found in GIFs, and many of them comment on the broader social life of these image files.

Hence the Myspace page... GIFs grow, breed, and comingle sparklingly on Myspace.
Whoa, well put. Also, Tom Moody explains (in reference to this show and his upcoming solo show of GIFs):
Why GIFs? They're a relatively "open source" way to get ideas, in the form of moving images, out to broad audience. They are low or no cost to make, consume very little bandwidth, no one has to buy or download a proprietary player to play them. They have their own special charm, minimal in the way garage rock is minimal.
My video is called "Marathon" and will look like the image up there at the top of this entry, except those little dudes will be animated and running a non-stop icon marathon (in a never-ending hypnotic seamless loop.) It involves icons made using this popular website. If you're not farmiliar with these little guys, the idea is that you pick out a ...

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Originally posted on Guthrie by Rhizome


Lonely Los Angeles

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I wanted post this old project before it gets too ancient. Pre-Google Maps, when online maps were small pixelly GIFs, I went exploring around on MapQuest collecting map shots here in Los Angeles that had very little info, very few street lines or words, etc., big open spaces. I like the way they look, and I like imagining what's inside these big empty fills... In a lot of cases there's semi-wilderness, I suppose (which is a strange to think of!)

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Originally posted on Guthrie by Rhizome


computerfinearts.com @ [DAM] Berlin

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This is a tad late, but the show runs through December 5th.

COMPUTER FINE ARTS COLLECTION OF DORON GOLAN

Internet Art / Software Art

www.computerfinearts.com

Exhibition 06:
10th November 2006 – 5th December 2006

Doron Golan collects artwork, which have been developed for the internet. He concentrated on an aspect of contemporary art, which was consindered as not marketable. The different pieces, which were developed specifically for the Web are free available for everybody. In many cases the internet, with its specific possibilities, is an integral part of the artwork. By aquiring these pieces he enables the persistence of these artworks online. The collection is internationally and you´ll find some important artists, which were already known for internet-art in the 1990s. We present his collection as a projection in the gallery.

[DAM] Berlin
Digital Art Museum
Tucholskystr. 37
D-10117 Berlin

Tue- Fri 12-6 pm | Sat 12-4 pm



There’s a lot of great stuff in Doron’s collection. It’s a very valuable resource, so check it out!

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Originally posted on MTAA Reference Resource by T.Whid


Discussing the Hymn of Insanity across the ocean with YouTube

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videoblog.png

Had a conversation with Marcus van Soest, a Dutch Artist, about how modern artists can collaborate, online and in real time to effect social change... [blogged by Marshall Sponder on Smart Mobs]

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Tuned Stairs

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Tuned Stairs

Tuned Stairs is an installation that turns stairs into a playful musical experience. As visitors walk down the stairs leading to the exhibition, their footfalls activate a musical sound. The intention is to remind visitors about the importance of the simplest actions and experiences we take for granted.

Half of each step is covered in a floor sensor matt (leaving the part of the stair for non-participants). Once stepped on, this switch is sent to an Arduino board, which in turn triggers a solenoid hammer, striking a metal resonating bar. Each bar is tuned to produce a different tone. This page shows early prototypes using a cowbell and wooden moving arm.

The project was created for Centre Pompidou in Paris, by the interactive department at Fabrica, project team members included Andy Cameron, Daniel Hirschmann, Hans Raber, Federico Urdaneta and Carlo Zoratti.

More information:
Daniel Hirschmann pages & photos
Fabrica pages
Exhibition information

Why do I blog this? I really like projects that turn everyday transient spaces into playgrounds. Rather than use floor sensors to trigger computer sound samples, they are using real physical objects to produce sound.

This project reminds me of Greyworlds work such as Klang Entree, Stairway and Railings.

Tuned Stairs

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Originally posted on Pixelsumo by Chris OShea


CALL: ARTIST in RESIDENCE [AiR] 2007

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ARTIST in RESIDENCE [AiR] 2007

OPEN CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

+ + DEADLINE: 2 JANUARY 2007 + +

in brief: residency period 3 months dates from March 2007 location Amsterdam, Netherlands

The Netherlands Media Art Institute is pleased to announce an open call for the Spring 2007 round of its Artist in Residence (AiR) program.

The AiR programme at the Netherlands Media Art Institute aims to support the exploration and development of new work in digital/interactive/network media and technology based arts practice. The residency provides time and resources to artists in a supportive environment to facilitate the creation of new work that is produced from an open source perspective. We encourage a cross disciplinary and experimental approach. This is a practice based residency designed to enable the development and completion of a new work.

Our focus for this open call is on open source interactive installation art, in which the following occurs: - interaction between tools and/or software - interaction between tools and artwork - interaction between audience and artwork

The Netherlands Media Art Institute offers an open environment with technical assistance and an active advisory board which will give feedback and support in technical, conceptual and presentation issues. There is access to studio and exhibition equipment, technical support from the Institute’s staff and production help from interns. The technical staff is specialized and has good contacts with programmers of the following software, a.o.: PD/PDP, Blender, Dynebolic, Linux. We expect the artist to have knowledge and insight in the technical realization of the concept.

It is integral to the mission of the AiR program that artists participate in presenting their work in a public form appropriate to their project. This can include gallery installations, demonstrations of research in progress, panel discussions, on-line projects, or multimedia performances, in addition to open studio events ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Marieke Istha