Posts for November 2006

Make Vol 8: the toys and games issue

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Mark Frauenfelder:

 Images Covers 08 The latest issue of MAKE is about to hit the stands, and this time the theme is toys and games. It includes a secret history of Myst, written by Myst co-creator Robyn Miller, a how-to on resurrecting a neglected pinball machine, making an asteroid mining colony on your kitchen table, creating robotic desk toys, building a rubber band ornithopter, making a toy gun controlled alarm clock, making a small batch coffee roaster, a special primer on mold making by Mythbuster's Adam Savage, and a great deal more.

Over on the Make blog, we have a podcast of a visit to the Lucky Ju Ju Pinball Arcadium in Alameda, California.

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Originally posted on Boing Boing by Rhizome


Technorati State of the Blogosphere, Q3 2006

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Cory Doctorow:
Technorati founder David Sifry continues his excellent quarterly reports on the "State of the Blogosphere" -- a statistical roundup of the blogs seen through the lens of Technorati's gigantic blog-scraper. Here's the big picture:

* Technorati is now tracking more than 57 Million blogs.
* Spam-, splog- and sping-fighting efforts at Technorati are paying dividends in terms of the reduction of garbage in our indexes, even if it does seem to impact overall growth rates.
* Today, the blogosphere is doubling in size approximately every 230 days.
* About 100,000 new weblogs were created each day, again down slightly quarter-over-quarter but probably due in part to spam fighting efforts.
* About 4% of new splogs get past Technorati's filters, even if it is only for a few hours or days.
* There is a strong correlation between the aging and post frequency of blogs and their authority and Technorati ranking.
* The globalization of the blogosphere continues. Our data appears to show both English and Spanish languages are a more universal blog language than the other two most dominant language, Japanese and Chinese, which seem to be more regionally localized.
* Coincident with a rise in blog posts about escalating Middle East tensions throughout the summer and fall, Farsi has moved into the top 10 languages of the blogosphere, indicating that blogging continues to play a critical role in debates about the important issues of our times.

Link

(Disclosure: I am a proud member of the Technorati advisory board)

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Originally posted on Boing Boing by Rhizome


presidential speech tagcloud

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presidenttagcloud.jpg

An interactive tagcloud of the words that US presidents used frequently in their speeches, showing which issues they deemed important over time. the dataset consists of over 360 documents, from speeches, official documents, declarations, & letters written by the Presidents of the US between 1776 - 2006 AD. a timeline slider allows users to animate the tagcloud over the years.

see also parsing the state of the union & power of words & state of the union visualization.

[links: chir.ag|via boingboing.net & datapacifica.blogspot.com|thnkx Mart!n]

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Originally posted on information aesthetics by Rhizome


Artists of the Future?

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Artificial life has long held our collective imagination captive, and the robot, one of its main emissaries, has been envisioned in a seemingly endless array of forms--from agent of evil to helpful hand around the house (of the future). Nonetheless, the robot's utility seems yet to be fully exercised, or even, approximated. ArtBots, a roving exhibition organized by Douglas Repetto and a changing group of co-curators, bridges art and robotic possibility. Gesturing to the breadth of robotic forms, Artbots casts a wide net, accepting 'robotic art or art made by robots,' and clarifying 'if you think it's a robot and you think it's art, we encourage you to submit.' Opening November 9th and running through the 12th at Location One, the NYC regional exhibition presents works by eight artists/ collectives. A visit to the gallery will provide you with the chance to commune with Jason Van Anden's tender, child-like Niel and Iona; to get rich fast with Jonah Brucker-Cohen's IPO Madness, a slot machine that generates catchy IPOS perfect for the emerging Internet entrepeneur; or to tune in to the groaning of Ranjit Bhatnagar's hovering, self-programmed accordion Misericordiam, amongst other kinds of engagements. See how work made by humans holds up against this wide range shapes, sounds, and algorithmic possibilities. - Lauren Cornell

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Artists of the Future?

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Artificial life has long held our collective imagination captive, and the robot, one of its main emissaries, has been envisioned in a seemingly endless array of forms--from agent of evil to helpful hand around the house (of the future). Nonetheless, the robot's utility seems yet to be fully exercised, or even, approximated. ArtBots, a roving exhibition organized by Douglas Repetto and a changing group of co-curators, bridges art and robotic possibility. Gesturing to the breadth of robotic forms, Artbots casts a wide net, accepting 'robotic art or art made by robots,' and clarifying 'if you think it's a robot and you think it's art, we encourage you to submit.' Opening November 9th and running through the 12th at Location One, the NYC regional exhibition presents works by eight artists/ collectives. A visit to the gallery will provide you with the chance to commune with Jason Van Anden's tender, child-like Niel and Iona; to get rich fast with Jonah Brucker-Cohen's IPO Madness, a slot machine that generates catchy IPOS perfect for the emerging Internet entrepeneur; or to tune in to the groaning of Ranjit Bhatnagar's hovering, self-programmed accordion Misericordiam, amongst other kinds of engagements. See how work made by humans holds up against this wide range shapes, sounds, and algorithmic possibilities. - Lauren Cornell

http://www.artbots.org/

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


1st Reno Interdisciplinary Festival of New Media

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Joseph DeLappe:

RIFNM 06 The 1st Reno Interdisciplinary Festival of New Media
http://www.unr.edu/art/RIFNM.html

The Department of Art at the University of Nevada, Reno, presents the 1st Reno Interdisciplinary Festival of New Media (RIFNM 06) RIFNM 06 highlights an international selection of work by graduate and Phd students working with new digital technologies for the creation of art. Artists working in and across disciplines were invited to submit works to be considered for five interrelated events/venues: exhibit, netart, perform, project(full-dome) and present. The resulting festival schedule of events presents a unique opportunity to directly experience innovative work being created by a diversity of emerging artists exploring digital systems for visual and experiential production.

Participating Artists/Affiliations:
-Arthur Elsenaar and Remko Scha, Sheffield Hallam University, United Kingdom
-Gudmundur S. Gunnarsson, Mills College
-Sabrina Berryman, University of Utah
-Margaret Noble and Edyta Stepien, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
-Jolanta A Lapiak, NSCAD, Nova Scotia, Canada
-Martin Machado, San Francisco Art Institute
-Suzanne Yo Martinsen, University of Central Florida
-Pete Froslie, Massachusetts College of Art
-Alejandro Duque, European Graduate School, Switzerland
-Jamie Timms, University of California, Santa Barbara
-Mike Godwin, University of California, Santa Barabara
-Conor McGarrigle, National College of Art & Design Dublin, Ireland
-Stephanie Jeanjean, Graduate Center of CUNY (City University of New York)
-Melissa Grey and Robert Kirkbride, The New School, New York City
-Pamela Kray, The New School, New York City
-So Jung Kwon, Otis School of Art and Design, Los Angeles
-Si Jae Byun, School of Visual Arts, New York City
-Walter Nelson, Griffith University, Australia
-Stephen Cady, University of Illinois, Chicago, School of Art and Design
-Jeanne Jo, Rhode Island School of Art and Design
-Jake Lee High, Massachusetts College of Art

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Joseph DeLappe


Bodydataspace - Ghislaine Boddington and Armand Terruli

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Building Design Magazine (BD) has published an article by Elaine Knutt discussing the potential for telematic experiences to be constructed in public spaces by the use of interactive architectural surfaces. Telematics (tele-communication and informatics) broadly explores how communication has transformed our experience of social connectivity and new emergining patterns of communication and power structures.


visualisation of how a waterfall image would look projected on to Canary Wharf.

Thanks to this article I was pleased to find out about a new group of artists and architects called bodydataspace ( b>d>s) created by Ghislaine Boddington and Armand Terruli who are exploring ‘the integration of interactive and body-intuitive interfaces into public sites. Bodydataspace have proposed that Canary Wharf,  London’s tallest building 235m, have a giant projected waterfall cascading down its facade. The waterfall would not be a computer generated animation but a real-time projection of Angel Falls in Venezuela. the world’s highest free-falling waterfall at 979m.


BDS’s entry to the Lift New Parliament competition was for an inexpensive demountable structure-cum-projection-screen. Audiences inside these mobile venues — in London and Namibia, for instance — could be digitally connected

Ghislaine Boddington is an artist, director, curator and presenter, a specialist in dance/performance and the evolution of body responsive technologies, virtual physical body networks and interactive interfaces. Previously Ghislaine was director and founding member of the London based sound/movement research unit shinkansen  (1989-2004). Armand Terruli is an architect of fifteen years who has diversified his design output through interactive exhibition design, audio/visual work and into responsive environments. Over the years Armand has notably designed and project managed galleries at the National Maritime Museum, the Saudi Arabian Pavilion at Lisbon Expo 1998 and the Faith Zone at the Millennium Dome.


Body Data Space’s 3m diameter balloon acts as a projection screen ...

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Originally posted on Interactive Architecture dot Org by Rhizome


Jane McGonigal

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This Might Be a Game

This Might Be a Game: Ubiquitous Play and Performance at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century by Jane Evelyn McGonigal :: Doctor of Philosophy in Performance Studies :: University of California, Berkeley.

This Might Be a Game examines the historical intersection of ubiquitous computing and experimental game design, circa 2001 AD. Ubiquitous computing, or ubicomp, is the emerging field of computer science that seeks to augment everyday objects and physical environments with invisible and networked computing functionality. Experimental game design is the field of interactive arts that seeks to discover new platforms and contexts for digital play. The convergence of these two fields has produced a significant body of games that challenge and expand our notions of where, when, and with whom we can play. This dissertation explores how and to what ends these playful projects reconfigure the technical, formal and social limits of games in relation to everyday life.

To mark the heterogeneity of this experimental design space at the turn of the twenty-first century, I propose three distinct categories of ubiquitous play and performance. They are: ubicomp games, research prototypes that advance the scientific agenda of ubiquitous computing through game design; pervasive games, performance-based interventions that use game imagery to disrupt the normative conventions of public spaces and private technologies; and ubiquitous games, commercial entertainment projects that replicate the interactive affordances of video and computer games in the real world.

I examine seminal games from each of these three categories, including Can You See Me Now? (Blast Theory/Mixed Reality Lab, 2001); the Big Urban Game (The Design Institute, 2003); and The Beast (Microsoft, 2001) respectively. My discussion draws on original gameplay media, design statements, and first-person player accounts. My critical framework is based on close readings of the play and performance values expressed in ...

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Kinetic Sculptures by Conrad Shawcross

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Conrad Shawcross

London based artist Conrad Shawcross creates these fantastic kinetic sculptures that draw inspiration from philosophy and scientific theories.

Shown above is ‘Loop System Quintet‘ (2005):
“Each of the five oak machines in Loop System Quintet â�� connected by a single drive-shaft - draws a different â��knotâ�� of light in space, predetermined by the ratio of the cogs that drive it. These ratios are directly related to formal theories of musical harmony (Harmonics). The resulting light patterns, perceived by the viewer only as the machines rotate, can therefore be regarded as visual transcriptions of musical chords….The circles of energy produced by the lights also relate to string theory, a complex scientific theory stating that matter is comprised of vibrating â��stringsâ�� of energy rather than single, isolated particles”

Watch video

Conrad Shawcross

Created in 2004, ‘Light Perpeptual I‘ (2004) must have been a precursor to the work above.

“Displayed in a darkened gallery, the device works as a giant drawing machine, blasting itâ��s luminous patterns through the wire grid onto the walls, leaving the viewer seeing spots, like from staring into the sun. Conrad Shawcross isnâ��t making paintings on canvas, but rather through mechanical invention, heâ��s imprinting his image directly into the eye”

Further reading & sources above:
In the studio: Conrad Shawcross (Telegraph, 2005)
Conrad Shawcross, sculptor (Guardian, 2006)
Portrait of the artist as a young boffin (Observer, 2005)
BBC Feature

The exhibition ‘No Such Thing As One‘ brings together a body of work that explores ideas concerning time and the essence of matter. On display at the Victoria Miro gallery, east London, until 18th November.

You may also want to visit the Kinetica Museum in Spitalfields to see more moving sculpture artworks.

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Originally posted on Pixelsumo by Chris OShea


More branches, objects, sounds and empty rooms.

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Chelpa ferro is a brazillian collective of visual, video and audio artists.

branches, sound objects and an otherwise empty room

As with Jessica Rylan, I don’t really know how their installations sound like, but I love them.

more branches, sound objects and an otherwise empty room

More chelpa ferro

via

tags:

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Originally posted on Processing Blogs by Rhizome