Posts for June 2006

Disrupting the broadcast

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Fabian Winkler's PI (personal interpreters) is a set of small robotic devices, which deconstruct TV broadcasts' audio signals. The robots interpret the regular audio signal as control code and translate it into abstract rhythmic sounds.

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PIs can be plugged into the sound output of a TV set (via RCA cables). Using suction cups, individual modules can be attached anywhere to the surface of the TV. These modules translate the sound output from TV broadcasts into movements of mechanized parts that scratch, hit and thump on the surface of the TV set using it as a resonant body. The audience still sees the images but hears only the deconstructed sounds created by the robotic modules - vaguely reminding them of the original soundtrack but challenging them to interpret it in new ways.

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Check the project at ZeroOne San Jose, this summer.

For an intervention on images, and in a sousveillance/surveillance context this time, Austrian activists Quintessenz created an anonymous surveillance system that uses a face-recognition software to place a black stripe over the eyes of people whose images are recorded (via Wired).

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New Scientist reported today on a video surveillance system that scrambles people's faces to protect them from unwarranted monitoring. Developed by Swiss company EMITALL Surveillance, the algorithm of the technology singles out any people in a video feed, on the basis of their movement, and disguises them digitally while leaving the rest of the scene intact (Videos 1, 2 and 3). Only those in possession of the encryption key can unlock the scrambled regions and identify the people shown on-screen.

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The system can even use different encryption keys to scramble the identity of particular people under surveillance, says Touradj Ebrahimi, founder of EMITALL Surveillance (thanks Emily!)


More broadcast disruption
: SVEN - Surveillance Video Entertainment Network, a real-time video ...

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Bird's Eye View of London

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The common phrase 'bird's eye view' generally assumes that the power of birds to surveil a wide plane endows winged creatures with a greater, more perfect picture of a place, and perhaps even its people. More recently, birds have participated in surveillance infrastructures through their hosting of RFID chips. Artists Marcus Kirsch and Jussi Ängeslevä argue that pigeons have 'become maverick messengers in the information super-highway, fusing feral and digital networks,' and they take advantage of this scenario in their project, Urban Eyes. This multimedia work 'uses wireless technology, birdseeds, and city pigeons to reconnect urban dwellers with their surroundings.' When tagged birds, in London, land on feeding platforms, aerial images of their location are sent to nearby bluetooth devices. By tracing the travels of pigeons, which are quite complexly patterned despite being confined to within one mile of their nests, the artists remind Londoners of the significance of their underappreciated neighbors and suggest that their social lives can tell us something about our own models of interaction and mobility. Through July 9th, the House of Technologically Termed Practice (HTTP Gallery) will exhibit live and archived documentation of the project. - Marisa Olson

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Studio IMC @ The Museum of TV & Radio

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The Museum of Television & Radio Presents Beyond TV: New Media Art from Studio IMC An Interactive Gallery Exhibit in the Spielberg Gallery, 6/2 - 8/31, 2006

Offers visitors the opportunity to experience technologies used in video games, the Internet, social software, and cell phones.

Comprised of five separate pieces, this exhibit of interactive art offers visitors the opportunity to experience technologies used in video games, the Internet, social software, and cell phones—all of which will ultimately have an impact on television as we know it today.

Individual Piece Descriptions

•CINE 2.0

(Collaborative Immersive Networked Environment, pronounced "sign")

Artists: James Tunick, Miro Kirov, and Houston Riley with Tony Rizzaro and Braden Weeks Earp

CINE 2.0 is a mixed-media environment inspired by Star Trek: The Next Generation’s Holodeck. Multiple users fly through an urban datascape in an immersive environment by using body gestures. Participants in the environment can also collaborate to compose music and, in addition, people out in the city itself can send photographs from their cell phones to be incorporated into the datascape environment.

CINE takes the computer screen out of the box and reconfigures it as a life-size environment. Control of visuals and sound takes place through full-body gestures rather than just mouse-clicks. As the traditional computer screen and mouse-keyboard interface transforms to fill the room, future entertainment platforms like CINE will enhance collaboration among multiple users, opening up whole new worlds of learning, art, creativity, and play. CINE is powered by a network of servers and computers that includes Studio IMC's BlackBox and IMCvote mobile technology.

•Swarm

Artist: Daniel Shiffman

Swarm paints a digital portrait of the viewer. Stationary viewers will see their portrait, while moving ones will produce an image more like an abstract painting.

Swarm is an interactive video installation ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by James Tunick


Judi Harvest

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Lunapienna01 Judiharvestsatellite-2

New York-based artist Judi Harvest's work constantly looks to the illuminated cosmos for inspiration. Her upcoming September installation at Venice's famed Caffé Florian, Venetian Satellite, will be similar in form and aesthetic functionality to her Venice installation Luna Piena, a sped-up lunar calendar of 2,070 blown glass spheres that's on view at the Valaresso vaporetto stop through November 2006. (Pictured left.) Like Luna Piena, Venetian Satellite is crafted from stainless steel and Murano glass, but here the high-tech chandelier refers to one of humankind’s great additions to the solar system, the world’s first communications satellite, Telstar. These pieces seem to marry the structural spirits of Nam June Paik, the Arts and Crafts movement, and the architecture IM Pei. Part of Caffé Florian's bi-annual exhibition that coincides with Venice's Architecture Biennale, ‘Venetian Satellite’ will be in orbit from 6 September-31 December 2006.

by Kristopher Irizarry

TAGS: Art, Exhibits, Installations, Sculpture, Venice,

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Originally posted on Cool Hunting by Rhizome


casa de citas/house of words

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exhibition:::::::::::::::::::house of words

a work of::::::::::::::::::::artefactes (rubén tortosa and paco berenguer)
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::www.artefactes.net

curator::::::::::::::::::::::nilo casares
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::www.comisario.net


room:::::::::::::::::::::::::gran canaria espacio digital
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::www.grancanariadigital.com


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::in order to activate the exhibition, we would appreciate a brief email to <casadecitas@artefactes.net>, on the current situation of interpersonal relationships.

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::introduction of the exhibition::::::::::::::::::::

house of words: a place in hyperspace where a piece of writing may experience an abduction.

one of the main features of contemporary art is its processing or even progressive nature. the beginning of an idea is led towards several possible directions. this same thing has just happened to i sent you a red cadmium. from the start, the project was an incentive to experience in a vivid way, the alterations that a piece of writing will suffer through its interchange online.

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by nilo casares


Interface and Society

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Accessing the "Technosphere"

Interface and Society: Deadline call for works: July 1 - see call; Public Private Interface workshop: June 10-13; Mobile troops workshop: September 13-16; Conference: November 10-11 2006; Exhibition opening and performance: November 10, 2006.

In our everyday life we constantly have to cope more or less successfully with interfaces. We use the mobile phone, the mp3 player, and our laptop, in order to gain access to the digital part of our life. In recent years this situation has lead to the creation of new interdisciplinary subjects like �Interaction Design� or �Physical Computing�.

We live between two worlds, our physical environment and the digital space. Technology and its digital space are our second nature and the interfaces are our points of access to this technosphere.

Since artists started working with technology they have been developing interfaces and modes of interaction. The interface itself became an artistic thematic.

The project INTERFACE and SOCIETY investigates how artists deal with the transformation of our everyday life through technical interfaces. With the rapid technological development a thoroughly critique of the interface towards society is necessary.

The role of the artist is thereby crucial. S/he has the freedom to deal with technologies and interfaces beyond functionality and usability. The project INTERFACE and SOCIETY is looking at this development with a special focus on the artistic contribution.

INTERFACE and SOCIETY is an umbrella for a range of activities throughout 2006 at Ateleir Nord in Oslo.

Originally from unmediated, ReBlogged by eteam on Jun 4, 2006 at 08:36 PM

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Originally posted on Eyebeam reBlog by Rhizome


Implanting a magnet in your fingertip adds a sixth sense

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Cory Doctorow: This morning's Wired News has a fascinating article on the practice of implanting small, strong rare-earth magnets in one's ring-finger. The result is a kind of "magnet sense" -- people who've had the implant report that they can tell when a wire is live and when they're going through a magnet security-scanner at a store, even when their laptops' hard drives are spinning up.

Quinn Norton of Wired News has had the operation and writes in detail about how it felt, what the problems were, and what she was able to do once it was in place. The most amazing part is that months after the magnet implant fragmented and Quinn lost her "sixth sense," it reassembled itself (magnets tend to draw towards one another) and the sense returned.

What if, seconds before your laptop began stalling, you could feel the hard drive spin up under the load? Or you could tell if an electrical cord was live before you touched it? For the few people who have rare earth magnets implanted in their fingers, these are among the reported effects -- a finger that feels electromagnetic fields along with the normal sense of touch...

According to Huffman, the magnet works by moving very slightly, or with a noticeable oscillation, in response to EM fields. This stimulates the somatosensory receptors in the fingertip, the same nerves that are responsible for perceiving pressure, temperature and pain. Huffman and other recipients found they could locate electric stovetops and motors, and pick out live electrical cables. Appliance cords in the United States give off a 60-Hz field, a sensation with which Huffman has become intimately familiar. "It is a light, rapid buzz," he says.

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Originally posted on Boing Boing by Rhizome


Changing interiors

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Alexander Wiethoff's Colour Vision, installed at the Museum of Perception, in Rohrbach (Austria), allows the visitor to change the room colour with the position of his body. Each posture symbolizes a different status like activity, calmness, reflectiveness and is visualized by different colours.

The installation made me think of Will Pappenheimer's Public Mood: Light Temperature. When installed at ZeroOne San Jose, the system will allow Internet users to change the light temperature of the cafe space. The artwork is inspired by the mood ring, which displays the emotional condition of its wearer as color hue. In this case it is a public issue which must be chosen by the Internet participant and then translated into color temperature for the cafe space. The accompanying website will present a simple question about a current public issue. Once web users have submitted their answer to the question, a search engine will retrieve key words from a Google NEWS search associated with the public issue "mood." The user then chooses a cultural color model, which aligns the chosen color with the public issue "mood." This color is then translated to a server in the cafen space, which translates the designated color to a DMX controlled system of LED lights projected on the ceiling. When online users are not engaged in mood selections, the system will automatically search the web for public issue "moods" to change the colorcast.

The installations transform the directives of surveillance, home automation and open-sourced Internet applications into possibilities for network participation in architectural mood.

But let's get back to Colour Vision, the installation raised my curiosity and as i couldn't find much information about it on the website, i asked Alexander Wiethoff, a German interaction designer currently based in Italy to give me more details about ...

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Bird's Eye View of London

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The common phrase 'bird's eye view' generally assumes that the power of birds to surveil a wide plane endows winged creatures with a greater, more perfect picture of a place, and perhaps even its people. More recently, birds have participated in surveillance infrastructures through their hosting of RFID chips. Artists Marcus Kirsch and Jussi Ängeslevä argue that pigeons have 'become maverick messengers in the information super-highway, fusing feral and digital networks,' and they take advantage of this scenario in their project, Urban Eyes. This multimedia work 'uses wireless technology, birdseeds, and city pigeons to reconnect urban dwellers with their surroundings.' When tagged birds, in London, land on feeding platforms, aerial images of their location are sent to nearby bluetooth devices. By tracing the travels of pigeons, which are quite complexly patterned despite being confined to within one mile of their nests, the artists remind Londoners of the significance of their underappreciated neighbors and suggest that their social lives can tell us something about our own models of interaction and mobility. Through July 9th, the House of Technologically Termed Practice (HTTP Gallery) will exhibit live and archived documentation of the project. - Marisa Olson

http://www.http.uk.net/docs/exhib10/exhibitions10.htm

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


Paul Chan, Embedded (ArtForum)

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1149175855artforum 
cover : Paul Chan

via e-flux:
    This summer in Artforum:

Embedded in the Culture. Artforum senior editor Scott Rothkopf looks at the multifarious endeavors of artist Paul Chan, discussing work ranging from the artist's large-scale, Godot-like digital projections (sampling Goya, Pasolini, and Biggie Smalls) to his recent video of convicted civil rights lawyer Lynne Stewart -- a portrait in which legal discourse is interlaced with the ethics and emotional impact of poetry.

In Chan's practice, a pop aesthetic at once winsome and brutal is brought to bear on the peculiar urgencies of our time. The point, then, is not to delimit the aesthetic and the political but rather to relish the productive possibilities of their mutual contamination.
-- Scott Rothkopf on Paul Chan

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Via Newsgrist, via e-flux, via Artforum... Go look at Paul Chan's work!

Originally posted on NEWSgrist by joy garnett