Posts for January 2006

Solo exhibit of Christophe Bruno in Toulouse

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French net artist Christophe Bruno is to have a solo exhibition in Toulouse next week.

Gallery goers will be invited to test the famous WiFi-SM patch, a P2P (Pain-to-Pain) and Internet connected wireless device that you can fix on your body. It detects the information from some 4,500 news sources and analyses them looking for specific keywords such as death, kill, murder, torture, rape, war, virus etc.. Each time the text of the news contains one of these keywords, your WiFi-SM device is activated and provides you with an electric impulse. This impulse is calibrated so that you can feel a certain amount of pain, but is completely safe.

teach09.jpg

Live performance of the Human Browser, with Jérôme Piques. This piece is a wireless Google hack : as the artist enters keywords on a Wi-Fi PDA, to briefly describe the actor’s context, a program on a laptop uses these keywords as search on google. Then the laptop sends a text-to-speech audio of the search to an actor who repeats what he’s getting via the headphones (video.)

Also on show: Dreamlogs, non-weddings, épiphanies.

From January 10 to February 11, 2006, at the Sollertis gallery, Toulouse, France.

Via Wifi-art.

Work by Christophe Bruno previously blogged: Some time of available human brain. See also How to lose money with net art.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Microtel 2005

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Paul and Emma are doing a teletext TV station!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.......they are asking for submissions! so dont sleep on it!...above is one of the submissions....

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This is Paul B. Davis from Lektrolab and Emma Davidson aka Lektrogirl. Microtel teletext programs will be broadcast by NOS, Netherlands public television. Click thru to read more about the project!

Originally posted on Cory's Web LOG by Rhizome


Hayles Talk

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N. Katherine HaylesN. Katherine Hayles recently gave a talk about her new book, My Mother Was a Computer: Digital Subjects and Literary Texts, at HUMLab.

Mathematician Stephan Wolfram has recently proposed that many different kinds of complex systems, including human thought and action, can be modeled using cellular automata. These very simple computational systems have demonstrated that they are capable of generating complex patterns using simple rules. According to physicist Ed Fredkin, cellular automata underlie physical reality on a subatomic level; in his view, nature itself is software running on a Universal Computer. This presentation will look critically at these claims, asking whether we should consider them as physical models or as over-determined metaphors that would inevitably emerge in a historical period when computation is pervasive. This issue, and its proliferating implications, will be explored through Greg Egan’s print novel Permutation City, which imagines a world in which it is possible to simulate a person’s consciousness inside a computer, creating a Copy that has all the personality and memories of the original.

Here is a video stream & podcast of the event.

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Originally posted on WRT: Writer Response Theory by Christy Dena


Run Online

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Blast Theory: Can You See Me Now?Locative Arts (where a game is played with people running through the streets, rigged with PDAs, GPS and phones, usually with online players as well) have been big for a few years now. I missed the last Blast Theory event that happened in Oz last year and so am keen not to miss another one. Luckily, the game has online players as well and so I can join in on the fun. Blast Theory and the Mixed Reality Lab are running Can You See Me Now in Cardiff at the end of Oct. Here is what happens:

Online players log onto the website to be dropped into a virtual Cardiff. Blast Theory runners will search for you on the real streets using GPS, tracking your avatar down as you run away from them online. Use your arrow keys to flee down the virtual streets, send messages and exchange tactics with other online players. An audio stream from Blast Theory’s walkie talkies lets you eavesdrop on your pursuers, getting lost and out of breath.

Game times (GMT):
Friday 28: 10.00 - 12.00 and 14.00 - 16.00
Saturday 29: 11.00 - 13.00 and 17.00 - 19.00
Sunday 30: 11.00 - 13.00 and 14.00 - 16.00

There is a video of a previous running of this game on the web too.

The game is being presented as part of May You Live in Interesting Times, Cardiff’s inaugural Festival of Creative Technology. On Saturday 29th, a talk by Ju Row Farr from Blast Theory will be streamed live.

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Originally posted on WRT: Writer Response Theory by Christy Dena


The puppetpresident

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The puppetpresident

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Originally posted on WRT: Writer Response Theory by Jeremy Douglass


Submit to ISEA 2006 Symposium

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Dear Rhizomers,

As a member of the planning committee for the 2006 ISEA Symposium, in San Jose, CA, I would like to encourage you to submit proposals in one of two forms...

The Symposium Call for Participation for Papers and Presentations can be found here:
http://isea2006.sjsu.edu/symposiumcall/ The deadline for submission is January 15.

The Call for Participation for Workshops can be found here:
http://isea2006.sjsu.edu/workshopscall/
This call is open until January 31st.

As you may know, ISEA is one of the most important symposia and new media festivals. In particular, symposium chair Joel Slayton has been working to make the 2006 symposium a new kind of conference that excitingly transcends the model of traditional academic conferences.

On top of this, the festival itself promises to be a ton of fun (in the California sun), so you don't want to miss an opportunity to participate.

Thanks,
Marisa


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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Marisa Olson


artport gatepage Jan 06: Abe Linkoln & Marisa Olson - Abe & MO Sing the Blogs

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Christiane Paul:

January 06 gatepage=20
for artport, the Whitney Museum's portal to Internet art:
Abe & MO Sing the Blogs
by Abe Linkoln & Marisa Olson
http://artport.whitney.org

Blogs, like the Blues, have been credited with channeling "the voice of the people," but do blogs adhere to any one set of characteristics that defines them as a genre? And how might blogs be understood as public spaces, in light of the time-based performances that take place there?

Selecting the postings that comprise the greatest "hits" of some of their favorite blogs, Abe Linkoln & Marisa Olson "sing the blogs" in order to address these questions. While Linkoln's posts speak to musical genres at large, Olson's posts seek to find harmony with specific models. Both question the status of the author's voice...

The whole "album" is presented as a form of reblog, in an effort to self-reflexively dive into the meme culture that is its subject. The artists' blog gets situated as the site of a happening, and their intention is to come back and continue depositing performative ephemera.

Linkoln & Olson frequently work in the blog format. Previous examples of their collaborative work include Universal Acid and Blog Art, and separate projects My Boyfriend Came Back from the War (Abe Linkoln's 2004 Blog Mix), Screenfull.net (Linkoln & Jimpunk), and Marisa's American Idol Audition Training Blog.

http://www.universalacid.net/
http://blog-art.blogspot.com/
http://myboyfriendcamebackfromthewar.blogspot.com/
http://screenfull.net/
http://americanidolauditiontraining.blogs.com/marisa

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Christiane Paul


Call for workshop participation: Tangible code

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Arduino i/o board

Tangible code

Wednesday 15th of February - Saturday 18th of February at Atelier Nord Oslo/Norway by Marius Watz & Erich Berger

Free participation
Application deadline friday 27th of January
Send applications with CV to sense@anart.no

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Recently, code evidently became artistic material and programming artistic practice. The coding artist literally hacks his/her artwork, forms it with skilled hands, touching and communicating with and through it. Physical electronic interfaces enable the artist to tighten the relation between the artwork and the audience.

Tangible code is a workshop for artists and practitioners who are interested in the concepts of programming and physical computing.

The employed tools are the multiplatform and open source programming and hardware environments Processing and Arduino.

http://www.processing.org
http:/www.arduino.cc

During the workshop participants will be introduced into the basics of programming and the building of sensor controlled physical interfaces. It will be a hands on workshop and lab situation as Atelier Nord has a well equipped physical computing workplace.

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WORKSHOP PARTICIPATION

Participation is free of charge.
Artists and practitioners interested in participating are asked to apply with a CV to sense@anart.no
Application deadline January 27th.

Workshop directors and producer:

Marius Watz (NO/DE) http://unlekker.net/
Erich Berger(AT/NO) http://randomseed.org/

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Tangible code is part of the Interface and Society project at Atelier Nord.

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Read through for upcoming events at Atelier Nord and address!

Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Marius Watz


Urgent Analog Bulletin

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The Britain-based media arts collective, Lektrolab, is best known for teaching how-to workshops on hacking Nintendo cartridges and manipulating outmoded home electronics. So it's no surprise that their new project, Microtel, also involves breathing life into dying living room technology--in this case, the neglected aesthetic of teletext. The system was invented in England, in the 1970s, to stream text and graphics to analog television sets. Its vivid cathode colors and signature clunky graphics became the visual language of up-to-the-minute news bulletins and awkward advertisements before being replaced by newer text displays. Coming to the medium's rescue, Lektrolab recently posted an open call for teletext art on their website. They are compiling the submissions and, beginning January 26th, broadcasting them on Netherlands public television in conjunction with Rotterdam's 35th International Film Festival. The Microtel website has images of the submissions that have come in, thus far, and everything one needs to participate, including the software to make a teletext masterpiece. - Bill Hanley

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Urgent Analog Bulletin

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The Britain-based media arts collective, Lektrolab, is best known for teaching how-to workshops on hacking Nintendo cartridges and manipulating outmoded home electronics. So it's no surprise that their new project, Microtel, also involves breathing life into dying living room technology--in this case, the neglected aesthetic of teletext. The system was invented in England, in the 1970s, to stream text and graphics to analog television sets. Its vivid cathode colors and signature clunky graphics became the visual language of up-to-the-minute news bulletins and awkward advertisements before being replaced by newer text displays. Coming to the medium's rescue, Lektrolab recently posted an open call for teletext art on their website. They are compiling the submissions and, beginning January 26th, broadcasting them on Netherlands public television in conjunction with Rotterdam's 35th International Film Festival. The Microtel website has images of the submissions that have come in, thus far, and everything one needs to participate, including the software to make a teletext masterpiece. - Bill Hanley

http://projects.lektrolab.com/microtel

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Net Art News by Rhizome