Posts for February 2006

Who says math isn't pretty?

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A Professor of Interactive Media at UC Santa Barbara, George Legrady blurs the boundary between academic and studio practice by fusing technology with visual art. His Algorithmic Visualizations exhibit, at LA's Telic Arts Exchange through February 16, is a selection of three recent works that involve digital images generated using mathematical formulae. Legrady's virtuosity shines strongest in his site-specific activity. 'Making Visible the Invisible' was commissioned for the Rem Koolhaas-designed Seattle Central Library. The work translates Dewey decimal-based circulation stats on the non-fiction book collection into plasma screen displays of patterned color. That impulse to reflect the architecture's modular characteristics (the entire collection forms a continuous spiral) also emerges in 'Kinetic Flow,' a work designed 'to engage the kinetic experience of the downward movement on both escalator and staircase, one smooth, the other sequential,' in the Vermont/Santa Monica MetroRail Station. Smart, engaging and visually compelling, this one's not to be missed. - Peggy MacKinnon

http://www.telic.info

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Net Art News by Rhizome


NMF INTERVIEW: Jose Luis Brea

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INTERVIEW: Jose Luis Brea. The Critic Operator of the Web 2.0? by Ignacio Nieto

http://newmediafix.net/daily/?p=405
http://newmediafix.net/
February 12, 2006


NMF's contributor, Ignacio Nieto interviews José Luis Brea who was formerly Dean of the Fine Arts Academy of Cuenca and Director of Exhibitions for the Ministry of Culture between 1985 ­ 1988. As a free lance art critic, he is a regular contributor to Spanish and international art magazines including Frieze, Flash Art and Parkett. He is Spanish correspondent for Artforum and regional editor for Rhizome. He has organized multiples exhibitions as independent curator and has published several books including Auras Frias and El Tercer Umbral. Currently, he is prefessor of Esthetics and Theory of Contemporany Art at Carlos III University in Madrid, editor of the magazine Estudios Visuales and he is director of two new online projects: salonKritik and ::agencia crítica::
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-Read thru for full interview..

Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Eduardo Navas


Maeda: "What if Adobe said, 'New Photoshop CS3 with 80% less features?!'"

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Design by Politics is an interview with John Maeda where he discusses why many software business models are built to support fat.

I think it's because more is measurable, as a valuable outcome. Less is not measurable. What if Adobe said: New Photoshop CS3 with 80% less features?!...In Photoshop I use 10% of the features, easily, maybe less.

Maeda also brings up what he sees as an interesting paradox about creative thinking: The USA's need for creative thinking is increasing yet many of the classes that emphasize it are being eliminated from our schools.

I believe that creative thinking is rapidly disappearing, because business is so focused on measurable outcomes and the economy is known to improve if reading and mathematics are strong in society...In the US there's an emphasis on test-taking to determine the school budgets. What do the tests test? They test reading and math, so the schools are smart - if they want a good budget, they teach the right things so they remove music and art and gym. So the bigger problem is: how to we change the value of creativity? How do we get politicians to believe that greater creativity is good for the economy? Because if you look at all the literature on outsourcing, everyone says: "all the jobs are going to India, Romania, whatever, Pakistan, but don't worry, we people in the first world have this thing called creativity!", but the schools are removing creativity.

On the labels designer/artist:

It's just about being human. People always ask me "Are you a designer, are you an artist?". I'm just a person, there's no categorization necessary.

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Originally posted on Signal vs. Noise by Matt


Multi-Touch

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Pretty cool video avail here: Bi-manual, multi-point, and multi-user interactions on a graphical interaction surface. "While touch sensing is commonplace for single points of contact, multi-touch sensing enables a user to interact with a system with more than one finger at a time, as in chording and bi-manual operations." [via Jakob]

multi-touch sample

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Originally posted on Signal vs. Noise by Matt


ECHOES FROM THE MOUNTAINS

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1139721349adfarm.jpg

Sounds of XX Winter Games

Sound surrounds us all the time. John Cage pointed out that there is no such thing as silence; from practically the time we are conceived until the time we die, we live bathed in non-stop sound. Echoes From the Mountains

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo


Metal Gear creator Hideo Kojima: 'Games Are Not Art'

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<i>"I don't think they're art either, videogames," he said, referring to Roger Ebert's recent commentary on the same subject. "The thing is, art is something that radiates the artist, the person who creates that piece of art. If 100 people walk by and a single person is captivated by whatever that piece radiates, it's art. But videogames aren't trying to capture one person. A videogame should make sure that all 100 people that play that game should enjoy the service provided by that videogame. It's something of a service. It's not art. But I guess the way of providing service with that videogame is an artistic style, a form of art."</i>

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Hmmm.... I used to edit a paper zine called SMAC, for which I once commissioned an essay from Atari-founder Nolan Bushnell on whether video games were art. His answer: no. The issue coincided with SMAC's panel on the same subject, written up here in Wired (where Bushnell explains his position), in 2001--the olden days! ~marisa

Originally posted on unmediated by del.icio.us/regine::regine


Rhizome Promotion: Hosting With Heart

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What's sweeter than a dozen truffles, on Valentine's Day? The sweet deals Broadspire's offering on hosting! For a low $65 annual payment, Rhizome's beloved host will give you 350MB disk storage, 1GB data transfer a month, POP email, free setup, and daily content back-ups. Broadspire also offers more robust plans for those with higher bandwidth needs. So whether you're looking to splurge on yourself or that someone special in your life, Broadspire will fulfill all your digital desires. Signing up is as easy as saying 'Be Mine' and each mention of Rhizome will drop a dime in our heart-shaped donation box. We'll also share the love by listing your name and URL on our front page. It's a match made in heaven! - Rhizome.org

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Online visualization of teens breakups

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The Whitney Museum's Artport and the Tate Online have teamed up to commission three web projects. Launching today, Valentine's Day, The Dumpster by Golan Levin with Kamal Nigam and Jonathan Feinberg is an online visualization that depicts a slice through the romantic lives of American teenagers. Using postings extracted from millions of blogs, visitors can surf through tens of thousands of romantic relationships in which one person has "dumped" another.

dumpster.jpg

The Battle of Algiers (launches Wed 3.1), by Marc Lafia and Fang-Yu Lin, is a continual re-composition of scenes from the seminal 1965 film re-enactment of Gillo Pontecorvo's movie.

aaadumpst.jpg

By entering Screening Circle (launches Wed 3.22), by Andy Deck, visitors can compose loops of graphics and affect and edit each other's screens. The pieces, or segments, can be made by one person or by several people and the arrangement of the segments can be haphazard or precise.

Via Flavorpill.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Public Email Portraits

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Maybe they're a sign of an increasingly homogenous global culture, or maybe they reveal universal responses to contemporary life. Either way, the similarities between the snapshots in Finnish artist Kristofer Paetau's monthly email project, Picturepeople, are nothing short of uncanny. Posting each new message online, Paetau groups together found images from diverse sources that have remarkably similar subjects, from proud fishermen posing with their catches or smoking teenagers smiling for the camera, to kids throwing rocks at tanks and really elaborate fake fingernails. Why do people from different eras, locations, and cultures think such similar moments are worth capturing? The photos give each action a sense of sweeping social, political, or even ritual gravity, but beyond suggesting that an ultimate significance might be there, Paetau is playfully ambiguous about the implications of each set. His investigations are definitely timely though. Just browse a few snapshots on Flickr, and not only do the actions people document start to look similar, but the images also catalog contemporary values, desires, and fears--even if they are a little vague and sometimes ridiculous. - Bill Hanley

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Mixed-Reality Party In DC and Second Life

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Jerry23 writes "This Saturday The Happening will bring Second Life to first life. The Electric Sheep Company, a new metaverse developer, has virtually recreated R&B Coffee in Washington DC for use in a mixed-reality party and benefit for the DC art scene and several local nonprofits. Real people will mingle with avatars via realtime video projections in the real and virtual R&B spaces, and MAKE Magazine's Phillip Torrone will be on-hand showing off his homemade Virtual Reality headsets and gloves. The whole world is invited to attend in DC or Second Life, whichever's closer for you." This is just conceptually a weird idea to me.

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Originally posted on Slashdot by CmdrTaco