Posts for August 2006

Mission Eternity

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Mike Kuniavski, the curator of ISEA's interactive C4f3, picked up his five favourite projects of the festival. One of them is Mission Eternity by etoy, a white 20 foot sarcophagus that hosts a screen made of 17'000 LED lights and the ashes of the first Mission Eternity Pilots (who contribute their personal data and mortal remains). The sarcophagus was created from a shipping container and is used to archive and transport the "massive body of information" left behind after our death.

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In Mike's words: The basic notion is to use the power of networked digital technology and inexpensive storage to keep aspects of us alive after we're dead. On one conceptual level, it externalizes the network of memories and documents we leave behind, and places them into a digital world, which is projected into the physical one as a shipping container sarcophagus filled. The sarcophagus is simultaneously a display, an environment and metaphor, and as it ages, etoy will replace the LEDs with the ashes of the people whose digital selves they manage.

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Under the protection of thousands of Mission Eternity Angels (the living who provide a few mega bytes of their digital storage capacity) the Mission Eternity Pilots travel space and time forever. The Angels should be willing to share at least 50MB of disk space to host Arcanum capsules - the data of ME Pilots. A social back up solution establishes a p2p network that guarantees transparent long-term storage of data. The system and therefore the pilots only survives if Angels donate space.

The short-term plan (2006-2016) is to install an interactive city of the living and the dead that reconfigures the way information society deals with the conservation and loss of memory, time and death.

Sources for the images: digital brainstorming, etoy blog.

More ...

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


[Mateusz Herczka]

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Life Support Systems - Vanda is an attempt to analyze electrical signals from the vanda hybrida orchid, and apply language modeling techniques to these signals in a computer. The result is a virtual model, which continues to generate similar signals long after the original orchids are gone - a kind of computerized longevity. Mateusz Herczka

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


Writing About Virtual Words

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I have to confess I’m moonlighting in another world. I’ve started working in the virtual world Second Life as an “embedded journalist”. SLATE Magazine (Second Life Arts & Total Entertainment Magazine) is a new Second Life magazine that covers the arts in SL. There are 14 authors in the collective so far and we’re a mixed bunch of artists, academics, writers, business people and designers. At present there isn’t much analysis of SL out there as most blogs provide essential but simple reportage on events with little reflection. We’re taking a different tack and hoping to provide not only interesting information about things to do for SL residents, but analysis on what we think is going on. And, in true SL style we have a virtual office building with desks (I don’t get that, but it is funny). Here is a pic of our boardroom created by the talented Dell and Anya:

SLATE Boardroom

We are also paid in Linden dollars (the inworld currency), we’ll be having frequent events and there was a big launch. I unfortunately was unable to attend the launch because my interstate flight was delayed. But here is a pic taken by the wonderful editor of SLATE Anya Ixchel:

SLATE Launch Party

There are more details and pics at Anya’s page and at her flickr. Anya/Angela Thomas is a respected academic who has been looking at literacy in SL, even running postgraduate classes in it. The event had live streaming music and was attended by the 40 who could get in. Many couldn’t get in and this will be changed for future events when the SIM allowance will be tweaked accordingly.

The Magazine is now online at http://www.slatenight.com/. It will be available inworld and in pdf format very soon ...

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Originally posted on WRT: Writer Response Theory by wrt@writerresponsetheory.org (Writer Response Theory)


From the Western Edge

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Edge Conditions, at the San Jose Museum of Modern Art, is a two-part exhibition surveying some of the most active and challenging digital art made in recent years. Part-one opened in June and consisted of two major installations: 'Listening Post' by Mark Hansen and Ben Rubin and Ingo Gunther's 'WordProcessor.' Both approach the cartography of language in significant ways, including a conceptual referencing of the social and technological spaces in which various forms of mediated communication occur. Part-two of the show features over a dozen artists and opened in conjunction with ISEA2006. While a number of international artists, such as Thomson & Craighead, Young-hae Chang, and Tamiko Thiel are included, the show also makes a concerted effort to underscore the wealth and diversity of new media artists practicing in Northern California. The presence of luminaries like C5, Jim Campbell, Ken Goldberg, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Alan Rath, and Gail Wight reinforce the ongoing significance of the Bay Area as a new media cultural center. The show's title refers to the conditions that develop in boundary-like spaces

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From The Western Edge

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Edge Conditions, at the San Jose Museum of Modern Art, is a two-part exhibition surveying some of the most active and challenging digital art made in recent years. Part-one opened in June and consisted of two major installations: 'Listening Post' by Mark Hansen and Ben Rubin and Ingo Gunther's 'WordProcessor.' Both approach the cartography of language in significant ways, including a conceptual referencing of the social and technological spaces in which various forms of mediated communication occur. Part-two of the show features over a dozen artists and opened in conjunction with ISEA2006. While a number of international artists, such as Thomson & Craighead, Young-hae Chang, and Tamiko Thiel are included, the show also makes a concerted effort to underscore the wealth and diversity of new media artists practicing in Northern California. The presence of luminaries like C5, Jim Campbell, Ken Goldberg, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Alan Rath, and Gail Wight reinforce the ongoing significance of the Bay Area as a new media cultural center. The show's title refers to the conditions that develop in boundary-like spaces—whether they are between regions, fields, or more philosophical planes. If you have a chance to visit the museum between now and November 26, you'll see for yourself that these artists are certainly operating at the forefront of these already 'edgy' spaces. – Marisa Olson

http://www.sjmusart.org/content/exhibitions/current/exhibition_info.phtml?itemID=292

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


Street Use

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Kevin Kelly the founding executive editor of Wired magazine and author, considered an expert in digital culture, has opened a new blog called Street Use. Fabulous. [via Smart Mobs]

This site features the ways in which people modify and re-create technology. Herein a collection of personal modifications, folk innovations, street customization, ad hoc alterations, wear-patterns, home-made versions and indigenous ingenuity. In short -- stuff as it is actually used, and not how its creators planned on it being used. As William Gibson said, "The street finds its own uses for technology." I welcome suggestions of links, and contributions from others to include in this compendium. -- KK

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Originally posted on textually.org by emily


[Untitled]

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phone.over.jpg

Instrument consisting of 126, 1950's bakelite telephones, on 11 channels of various alternating current, controlled by midi, approx. 11 minute composition, by James Beckett.

  <p class="rb_attribution">
<span class="rb_source">
    <a href="http://www.vvork.com/?p=1565">Originally</a>
                from <a class="rb_source_link" href="http://artificialeyes.tv/refeed/out/?user=1">artificialeyes.tv reblog</a></span>

                by <span class="rb_author">mail</span>

<span class="rb_reblogged">

reBlogged

                on <span class="rb_modified">Aug 16, 2006,  3:31PM</span>
    </span>
</p>

Originally posted by mail from artificialeyes.tv reblog, ReBlogged by admeyers on Aug 16, 2006 at 11:54 AM

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Originally posted on Eyebeam reBlog by mail


[no title]

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phone.over.jpg

Instrument consisting of 126, 1950's bakelite telephones, on 11 channels of various alternating current, controlled by midi, approx. 11 minute composition, by James Beckett.

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


antiterror line

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Uphone In

Bureau of Inverse Technology's antiterror line is a service that enables every phone [home/cell/booth] to act as a networked microphone. For collecting live audio data on civil liberty infringements and other anti-terror events.

You call in and leave a message. Message may be spoken report or in-progress recording of an anti-terror attack. UPHONE uplinks your audio recording direct to the BIT online terror database. An audio accumulation of micro- incidents which individually may be inactionable but en masse could provide evidence for a definitive response.

The bit UPHONE is a distributed, publicly readwriteable newsnetwork designed to withstand the militarisation of your government/the martial takeover of your regular broadcast networks. System facilitates information collection under conditions that cannot be accurately predicted / for which you may be unprepared, for example when an antiterror event occurs you may be away from your Desk. The resultant audio files are held in an open database and can be monitored, syndicated or remixed for your purposes. Bureau will provide a full report and system maintenance.

BIT advises members of the public to report individuals or activity that may be directly or indirectly associated with anti-terrorist or antiterroristic activity. Public telephone booths provide the most effective anonymizing device for those who would prefer to remain unidentified. Individuals uploading information will not be re-contacted but authorship can be credited.

Uphone audio collection is designed to provide higher standards for evidence than other forms of documenting the erosion of civil liberties, such as questionaires, opinion polls and other statistics. Voice and sound data will be uploaded through this system. Inarticulate and non-vocal artefacts such as live civ-lib infringement actuality, will be fully credited, however recordings will need to be 2 seconds or more in length to appear in the database. Unclear recordings should ...

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Originally posted on networked_performance by michelle


[Not a Time Machine]

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Not a Time Machine is an interdisciplinary project that uses dance, music and video as forms of expression. The two central elements (water and electricity) constitute the fundaments of a gestural interface. By Miha Ciglar, Mojca Kasjak and son:DA.

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome