Posts for July 2006

Call: Article biennial of electronic art, Stavanger

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This call for works is very exciting, as there are very few bigger exhibitions of electronic art in the Nordic region. Electrohype in Malmö did an excellent biennial for many years, but had to close down due to short-sightedness of the local funding bodies.

i/o/lab in Stavanger has long been aiming to become a full-fledged node in the Norwegian electronic art network. With the Article project they will contribute significantly to the scene.

Call for work: Article biennial of electronic art, Stavanger.
Article is one of the main projects for Stavanger 2008 - European Capital of Culture. Article 2006 will be a pilot project for the 2008 installment, but also to underline that Article is intended as a biannual event BEYOND the scope of the European Capital year.

Article will be comprised of: a main exhibition; a conference related to the themes of the biannual; in-depth practical and theoretical workshops and seminars; and contributions from local resources and other collaborative partners.

The goal of Article is to promote artforms which don’t merely employ electronic techniques in its production and display, but also actively comment on technology, the ethics and politics of technology and the evolution and dissemination of technology. Article wishes to establish an open arena for artforms which critique and engage social processes and present reflected positions on the expressive qualities and contexts of the media.

By «Unstable artforms» we intend to encompass art which is not institutionalised and stabilised by traditional frameworks of production and distribution, art which crosses disciplinary boundaries, which engages unusual contexts and references, or art which is not anchored by permanent, static objects. […]

Deadline: 15 June 2006
URL: iolab.no/article/
URL:PDF with call details

e i/o/lab initiative was set up by Kevin Foust, Jens Laland and Hege Tapio ...

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WC Retro: Handbook for Bloggers and Cyber Dissidents

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By Jon Lebkowsky; September 21, 2005

Reporters Without Borders has produced an excellent Handbook for Bloggers and Cyber Dissidents (pdf), reviewed at Global Voices Online by Rebecca MacKinnon, who says it "is the first truly useful book I've seen aimed at the kinds of bloggers featured here at Global Voices every day: People who have views and information that they want to share with the world beyond their own national borders." Rebecca and her Global Voices colleague Ethan Zuckerman, who is also - full disclosure - President of Worldchanging's Board of Directors, are aggregating content from the growing numbers of bloggers worldwide who will welcome this book as a helpful guide and a support for bringing others into the "second superpower."

The handbook includes a piece by Ethan on anonymous blogging, which he discusses on his blog today. He explores whether concern that terrorists will benefit from the guide to anonymity and, if so, is there an argument for suppressing the information? Ethan says

...obscuring these techniques in the hopes that the dumber terrorists don't find them means that they're difficult to find for the people who need them: independent journalists, human rights activists and dissidents in nations that restrict speech....predict that more than a few readers of RSF's guide will disagree and I'm preparing for articles and blogposts that question whether RSF made the right move in publishing this guide. They did, and I'm proud to be a part of it.

We're proud you're a part of it, too.

(Posted by WorldChanging Team in WorldChanging Retro at 12:43 PM)

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Originally posted on WorldChanging: Another World Is Here by WorldChanging Team


Troika Ranch -16 [R]EVOLUTIONS

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16 [R]EVOLUTIONS
16 [R]EVOLUTIONS (2006, 3MB, 1:50 min)

I saw this piece from NY based group Troika Ranch a couple
of weeks back in deepest Essex, UK & it was utterly great - took me about ten minutes to put my jaw back in postion after. Certainly by far the most convincing & mature use of digital technology/projection in a dance context I have yet seen. Much of the visual flavor comes from the Isadora real time video manipulation software created by co-artistic director Mark Coniglio & used together with motion sensing software. It's not just the tech stuff though - it's great choreography & dance somehow informed by the particular rhythms, logic, that the tech feedback loop sets up, implies. It's the fact, too, that a company deploying cutting edge tech can still use simple shadow & stillness to devastating effect. I felt I was in at the birth of something quite new, quite different... Definitely worth catching.

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Originally posted on DVblog by michael szpakowski


2006-2007 Rhizome Commissions

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Lauren Cornell:

Hello,

On behalf of Rhizome, I'm pleased to announce that eleven international artists/groups have been awarded commissions to assist them in creating original works of Internet-based art. Each commission will range from $1000 -- $2500.

The selected artists are Annie Abrahams and Igor Stromajer, Nadia Anderson and Fritz Donnelly, Adam Brown and Andrew Fagg, Corey Jackson and Aaron Meyers, Zach Lieberman, Michael Mandiberg, the Institute for Applied Autonomy and Trevor Paglen, Evan Roth and Ben Engebre, SLOWLab (Carolyn Strauss and Julian Bleecker), Marek Walczak and Martin Wattenberg and YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES.

Rhizome Commissions are jury awarded, and one is determined by Rhizome Members through an open community vote. This year, Michael Mandiberg's project Real Costs was selected by the Member vote.

Project descriptions and artists' biographies are available at:

http://rhizome.org/commissions/2006.rhiz

Rhizome would like to thank our Members and the jury for lending their time, opinions and insight to the selection process.

[....]

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Lauren Cornell


[Ben Fry]

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screen-0000.jpg

Ben Fry’s Valence is a set of software sketches about building representations that explore the structures and relationships inside very large sets of information.

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Originally posted on VVORK by Rhizome


The Computer Hood into context

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Ten days ago, the Design for technology addicts post generated a lot of attention. The project was sometimes taken out of context and therefore misunderstood. As i felt guilty to have contributed to the "computer hood hysteria" i asked Joe Malia if he could send me a statement to clear this up. I'll just quote Joe:

"The computer hood is one object in a series that plays a small role in the 'Design for the Computer Obsessive' project but has really dominated the whole thing.

I wanted to characterise the behaviour of people engrossed in computer bound activities by illustrating it through the functionality of an object. The computer hood facilitates an amplified engagement between user and the computer, secluding them in a digital enclosure where the outside world is a memory and attention undivided. Those enjoying this hooded sanctity can relegate communicative interactions with the outside world to nothing more than an 'on demand' service. People outside are encouraged to 'SPEAK' towards a marked area on the back of the hood. Anything they say will be recorded and saved as an mp3 audio file on the computer desktop for perusal at the computer users leisure.

The project stemmed from an interest in the often turbulent relationship between people and technology. I began considering a series of questions. Can these relationships sometimes become dysfunctional and get out of hand? Can people become obsessed with, or even addicted to a technology?

Particularly now with the Internet and online social software, people can exist in a virtual world where they have complete control over the way they live and present themselves - would this ever appear more appealing than the responsibilities faced in modern life and would people ever neglect real world relationships in favour of virtual ones.

I felt it was ...

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Yoon Lee, Headlands Center for the Arts Tournesol Awardee presents at the luggage store

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Solo Exhibition, Yoon Lee, at the luggage store, sf, ca

Headlands Center for the Arts Tournesol Awardee
YOON LEE, large scale computer generated paintings

Dates of Exhibition:
July 7 - August 5, 2006

Opening Reception:
Friday, July 7, 2006 6-8pm

Venue:
The luggage store
1007 Market Street (nr 6th)
San Francisco, CA 94103

Telephone:
415. 255 5971

Website:
www.luggagestoregallery.org

Gallery Hours
Wed-Sat. 12-5pm and by appt.


At first glance, Yoon Lee's paintings appear
exuberant, as if her gestures capture the moment when
chaotic forces transform into ordered systems. She
squirts vividly colored acrylic paint out of plastic
bottles to create slick, tactile surfaces filled with
dynamic swarms of abstract shapes. Her bold yet
graceful forms seem swept up in their own fast-paced
trajectories, often set against traces of industrial
architecture. When viewed more closely, however, it
becomes evident that Lee's seemingly spontaneous marks
are actually computer generated and painstakingly
executed. She predetermines her formal vocabulary by
scanning and "mixing" popular media images, drawings,
and photographs of freeways, railroads, and
engineering structures taken along the Port of
Oakland - visual sites and by-products of global
capitalism that the artist experiences on a daily
basis. Her monumental paintings mesmerize with their
synthetic materiality, ultimately evoking the
ambivalent desire we feel when confronted by colorful
plastic consumer goods, beautifully crafted
confections, or successful advertising campaigns. We
are seduced into believing that these glossy,
overdetermined objects possess the power to comfort
us. As the artist explains, "his connection between
the work and consumer goods reflects my interest in
consumption as a strategy to assuage urban anxiety. My
work addresses the relationship between this anxiety
and the speed in which information and signals travel
through space."

Born in 1975 in Pusan, Korea and raised in San Diego,
California, Yoon Lee attended the University ...

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Rhizome


Feeling the Influence?

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Within contemporary media culture, there is a breed of 'stars' that either acquire or fabricate their celebrity through an exploration of the conventions of fame, public relations, and discourse networks. Italian artists Eva and Franco Mattes (a.k.a. 0100101110101101.ORG) have given these people a name: The Influencers. From July 6-8, Barcelona's Center of Contemporary Culture will play host to a 'festival of media action and radical entertainment' by this title. In a sense, the moniker is perfect. The seven presenters they've selected for this third 'episode' of the program (Vuk Cosic, Paul D. Miller/ DJ Spooky, Molleindustria, Irwin/ Neue Slovenische Kunst, Vencenzo Sparanga, Oscar Brahim, and Chicks on Speed) have been highly influential in both their investigations into the influence of pop media on peoples and cultures and in influencing that media--in intervening in it. Appropriately, the festival will be organized in the format of a talk show: ' The live talk show you won't see on TV!' The event's press release promises that these icons will 'take us into stories of collective hallucinations that turn into reality and vice versa.' If you can't be present in Spain, visit the festival's website for a video highlight reel from previous 'episodes.' - Marisa Olson

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Feeling the Influence?

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Within contemporary media culture, there is a breed of 'stars' that either acquire or fabricate their celebrity through an exploration of the conventions of fame, public relations, and discourse networks. Italian artists Eva and Franco Mattes (a.k.a. 0100101110101101.ORG) have given these people a name: The Influencers. From July 6-8, Barcelona's Center of Contemporary Culture will play host to a 'festival of media action and radical entertainment' by this title. In a sense, the moniker is perfect. The seven presenters they've selected for this third 'episode' of the program (Vuk Cosic, Paul D. Miller/ DJ Spooky, Molleindustria, Irwin/ Neue Slovenische Kunst, Vencenzo Sparanga, Oscar Brahim, and Chicks on Speed) have been highly influential in both their investigations into the influence of pop media on peoples and cultures and in influencing that media--in intervening in it. Appropriately, the festival will be organized in the format of a talk show: ' The live talk show you won't see on TV!' The event's press release promises that these icons will 'take us into stories of collective hallucinations that turn into reality and vice versa.' If you can't be present in Spain, visit the festival's website for a video highlight reel from previous 'episodes.' - Marisa Olson

http://d-i-n-a.net/influencers

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Originally posted on Rhizome News by Rhizome


Landscape music

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LocoSound is a work in progress that aims to synchronize an FM audio experience with the landscape viewed from a train window.

Through a system of GPS tracking, the audience can tune into a radio frequency when boarding a train wagon and become part of an audio visual experience that is based on a sound experience created for a specific train visual (the landscape between Zurich and Basel for example.) The system that is to be developed will be sensitive and responsive to any delays, unexpected stops or other real-time changes in the train ride.

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The experience is therefore not linear but interactive and responsive, taking into account the singular experience of a particular train ride.

A more sophisticated version of the project might include sound variations that depend on the external light or the train speed. The GPS system and any additional sensor would be linked to a central computer via a midi interface. The data and the sound will be managed through Max/MSP (or Pure Data)

LocoSound will be available in only one carriage. Travelers will tune in via an FM stereo receiver or via the tunner FM available on many mobile phones.

A project by Alain Bellet.

Related: Sonic City, a jacket which enables people to compose music in real time by walking through the city.

Via netzwissenschaft.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome