Posts for October 2005

Anne Pasternak, Executive Director, Creative Time

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2005_10_APasternak.jpgAnne Pasternak has been the Executive Director of Creative Time since 1994. During her tenure, she has shepherded projects like Tribute in Light, Art in the Anchorage, 59th Minute, Vik Muniz’s Clouds and Jenny Holzer’s current program being projected tonight at NYU’s Bobst Library, For the City.*

spoke with Anne about past, present and future Creative Time projects as well as her feelings on the Freedom Center and the privatization of arts funding.

What is Creative Time?
Creative Time has been around for over 30 years. We commission and present adventurous art in the public realm, which could range from the Tribute in Light, the two beacons of light in lower Manhattan after September 11th, to a skywriting project over Manhattan to laying artist carpeting down in Grand Central for four months. It takes many forms, in many places.

What’s the difference between Creative Time and Public Art Fund?
We are sister organizations and our missions and interests are very compatible. Recently, I think it’s become less clear the distinction. In the past, Creative Time was more multidisciplinary and tended to work on emerging artistic practices. Public Art Fund has started to get into some of the same territory. They are best known for presenting large scale celebrated sculptures in landmark destinations, but they have been doing that and other things too. But in general, they tend to be more sculpture-based and we tend to be more multimedia. And some would say, and I would agree, that Creative Time is more innovative.

Click thru for the entire interview. Anne and Creative Time have been tireless promoters and funders of public art in NYC. Creative Time gave a small grant to MTAA to do our first ever web art project way back in 1997 :-)

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Originally posted on Gothamist by Mindy


Support Rhizome

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Rhizome has launched their membership drive (as of September 19th — would have posted about it sooner but I was busy marrying my love and kicking back in Europe with her).



They’ve got some great Thank You gifts, one of which is being donated by MTAA. For just 500 bucks (Rhizome calls it the Root level) you get to support this great new media org and you also get a copy of 1 Year Performance Video Art Data (read more about what 1YPV Art Data is). The only other way to get the 1YPV Art Data is to watch 1YPV for one year (or buy one of the gallery versions).

So, let’s do the math. For 500 USD, you get 1YPV Art Data OR you can watch it for a year and get it for “free.

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Originally posted on MTAA Reference Resource by T.Whid


META[CC] Receives Franklin Furnace Funding

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image from television news overlayed with normal closed captionsand meta[cc] generated captions in news ticker format
conglomco media network:
META[CC] Receives Franklin Furnace Funding
META-CC.net, featuring an online real-time video captioning engine that
provides multiple perspectives and resources to the mainstream news
media, received Franklin Furnace's Future of the Present 2006 Grant,
supported by Jerome Foundation.
The website seeks to become an open forum for real time discussion and
commentary of televised media by combining strategies employed in
web-based discussion forums, blogs , tele-text subtitling, on-demand
video streaming, and search engines.
As the project develops, additional features such as web-based remote
channel switching, video archiving, further data-mining capabilities,
and on-demand streaming of archived content will be implemented.
Meta[CC]is a project of the Conglomco Media Network.
Utilizing the expanding potentials for copying, appropriating,
sampling, and synthesizing provided by the internet, Conglomco seeks to
create projects that explore the possibilities of social commentary and
creative activism in a networked and techno-savvy environment.
META[CC] ( http://meta-cc.net )
Conglomco Media Net ( http://conglomco.org )
Promo Video ( http://www.meta-cc.net/meta2.mov )

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by conglomco media network


A few words concerning open-source and art

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Pall Thayer:
http://pallit.lhi.is/palli/ArtOpS.pdf

[From the first paragraph: "Code-based art (or “software art

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Pall Thayer


Eatable Codes

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Rachel Beth Egenhoefer considers her Commodore 64 computer and Fischer Price Loom to be defining objects of her childhood.

achocolt.jpg CHOCO4.jpg

Revealed Messages invites visitors to take a chocolate but leave the wrapper, thus revealing a code in the form of chocolate / no chocolate, or 0/1. The installation is monitored by a webcam outputting the punchcard-esque image of the chocolate code. The act of taking or leaving chocolate reveals a code in binary digits and changes the message constantly. The 127 chocolates correspond to the 127 characters of the ASCII keyboard.

"Binary numbers are the language of computers," Egenhoefer explains. "These numbers ideally achieve my goal as an artist constantly: to make the intangible tangible while translating that into the visual image. I have used binary codes both physically and conceptually. Some of my work directly stems from the actual zeros and ones, other works relate more abstractly through the ideas of order, structure, memory, and communication".

sweater1.jpg cake4.jpg

She also knitted and baked some pretty surprising works such as Ergonomic Cakes to help you maintain good posture while using your computer and Knit Negotiation, a sweater for the space between you and your machine.

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I saw this project in Tallinn, during ISEA04 (I believe it was a wearables show), and everyone was raving about it.

Originally posted on we make money not art by Regine


Yoshi Sodeoka ASCII Movies

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Yoshi Sodeoka
The Who: My Generation (2004, 19.1MB)

Rendered entirely in ASCII characters of numbers and letters, Yoshi Sodeoka makes art from the debris of our culture by recycling popular video footage into a twisted alphanumerics imagery. Yoshi Sodeoka is  C505,  a New York based artist, designer and musician who has been producing both art and commercial projects since the early 1990’s.

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Click-through for Motley Crue, George Bush, and other ASCII treasures...

Originally posted on DVblog by admin


Misdemeanours

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Craig Fisher’s Misdemeanours. Huge, glittering knife handles jut from the walls. TNT detornator stands dangerously close to baby’s crib. A full-scale car crash made entirely out of vehicle upholstery spills satiny pools of blood and delicately stitched vomit across the gallery floor.

In juxtaposing fabric and craft with images of violence Fisher subverts the significance of masculinity and contemporary technology.

Wed 5 Oct - Tue 8 Nov.
Rokeby gallery, London.

Via flavourpill.

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Dang if Flavo(u)rpill doesn't have some of the smartest hipsters writing for them. PS Love this new blog...

Originally posted on No Garlic Please by Regine


datacloud

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datacloud.jpg

a simple but intriguing dynamic data visualization that displays the weather conditions of major cities across the globe simultaneously & in real time. the climate information is gathered from airports all over the world & updated several times a day. a textual map shows the weather conditions onto each city's name: font size relates to visibility, color to temperature, & transparency to humidity. in addition, the city names move with the speed & direction of their wind readings while their atmospheric pressure is applied as friction to the movement. [artificialtourism.com]

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Originally posted on information aesthetics by infosthetics


pop music sketches

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popsketchseries.jpg

a series of doodly visualizations generated from pop songs. the songs are analyzed note-by-note & at each note a specific line is drawn. the angle at which the line is drawn is determined by the pitch of the note, & the length of the line is determined by the volume of the note. the result is a series of playful, doodle-like, linear drawings. the authors consider these image series as a 'reinterpretation of the pop music media' that addresses the pre-adolescence (or childhood) aspect of pop music content. [structuredsound.net|thnkx Jake]

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Originally posted on information aesthetics by infosthetics


The [New] Power Generation

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A tube of paint was once new media. And remember the shock of those newfangled Daguerreotypes? Theorists have speculated wildly about what drives humans to crave newness, but the truth is that all media age. And while some are still prompted to use the phrase 'new media,' art has been made under this moniker since long before Madonna was a Material Girl. 'The Art Formerly Known as New Media,' at the Banff Centre's Walter Philips Gallery, was curated by fellows Sarah Cook & Steve Dietz to commemorate the tenth anniversary of the Banff New Media Institute. On view through October 23rd, the show features 14 BNMI alums whose once-novel work now verges on being canonical. Ranging from html and 3D experiments to more ironic or tactical pieces, the show is less bogged-down by the premise of displaying important early works than it is concerned with getting us over the hump of considering a medium's virginity, and onto considering art's persistent themes. Dietz said the curators hope that, like the artist formerly known as Prince, the work formerly known as New Media Art can simply come to be known as 'Prince' --I mean 'Art.' - Marisa Olson

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