Posts for November 2005

Artifact - a new journal from Routledge

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Routledge
Charlie Breindahl:

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

Artifact - a new journal from Routledge

Artifact is a new international, peer-reviewed academic journal treating the impact of computerization on design. [More....]

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Charlie Breindahl


New monochrom content // Fieldrecording in Sankt Wechselberg

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New monochrom content // Fieldrecording in Sankt Wechselberg: Our short film about art, talk and discourse.
"Around one and a half years ago, the American experimental musician Jerry Zachary Adamski conceived one of the most unusual and exciting projects in recent music history."



Link

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Originally posted on monochrom by Rhizome


The Newspaper for World Information City (14th-19th November, Bangalore) is now available online.

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The publication presents a collection of articles, interviews and essays relating to questions of Intellectual Property and urban transformations. The 30.000 copies of the World-Information City publication will also be distributed in Europe and Asia as well as at events related to the World Summit of Information Society (WSIS) in Tunis November 2005. http://static.world-information.org/infopaper/wi_ipcityedition.pdf The Paper has contributions from Peter Drahos, [...]

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Originally posted on newmediafix.net by Rhizome


Heard of any good arty RFID project?

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I'm off to Amsterdam for the Triggered by RFID workshop at Mediamatic. Yesterday i was preparing my talk about RFID as used by artists and designers. I hunted for ideas on the excellent networked_performance, RFID in Japan, textually and Pasta & Vinegar but i have to admit that, although i found one or two great projects, there's a lot of "let's do old stuff with this hype and controversial technology."

So dear dear readers, if any of you is working on or has heard of some exciting RFID-based design or art project, give me a shout at the address above.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Phone-less phone calls

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Digitall, by Ana Camilla Amorin and Tristam Sparks, is a kind of "always on" home telephone repurposed as a set of individual transmitters, each of them connected to a house or a person, which can be plugged and unplugged to the system along time. Each of these panels is customizable and can be shared as a gift/visiting card between friends.

11orbeu.jpg

The system consists of panels on the wall and an orb controlled by hand pressure.

Each panel has a speaker, a light source and a touch sensor coupled. There's three intensities of colour according to the availability of the person you could call: available, not available and on the phone.

Digitall can be used as an open broadcast channel: the sound from the others houses can be heard at less than 10 cm from the panel. This creates an ambient soundscape that offers an impression of what is happening in the distant space.

To start a conversation, the user touches the panel(s) corresponding to the person(s) s/he wants to talk with. The panel starts blinking and the volume of that channel is amplified. To talk in private mode, the user picks the orb. This simple hand gesture mutes all the speakers and the public microphone. To switch the connection off, the user drops the ball and the system returns to the initial state.

Don't miss the video of the prototype on the designer's website.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


The Shining trailer remix

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shining
The Shining trailer (direct quicktime link ~9MB) brilliantly re-edited to give Shining a feelgood romance.

Via the tattered coat who also have interesting background

Posted to

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Originally posted on Stunned by Rhizome


Funeral in World of Warcraft

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20051102 03
photo from The Mirror
[004] Snowly of The World of Warcraft (Xinhua) A young girl nicknamed "Snowly" died last month after playing the online game "World of Warcraft" for several continuous days during the national day holiday. Several days before Snowly's death, the girl was said to be preparing for a relatively difficult part of the game (namely, to kill the Black Dragon Prince) and had very little rest. She told her friends that she felt very tired. A big online funeral was held for Snowly one week after her death (see photo from The Mirror).

With 4.5M users there are bound to be deaths in the World of Warcraft and gauging by the relationships I'm building with fellow gamers I can definitely see how an online funeral would be a very big deal. I often see players playing until they pass out, especially when they are questing in a group where their participation is required for the group to hold together as a team. (I've passed out a few times as well.) There is also a lot of pressure to catch up if you drop behind a group of friends in order to play your role in the quests.

However, I don't see this as a reason to bash these games. Clearly the addictive nature of these games are a risk from a productivity and health perspective, but I think that the sense of responsibility and teamwork that is built by the games exceeds this cost. I've seen a lot of coaching of young players by older players about behavior, responsibility, sharing and kindness that is crisp and makes a lot of sense in the game context, but might be lost in a conversation in the real world. Players typically stay up all ...

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Originally posted on Joi Ito's Web by Rhizome


Doeringer swept off street: gallerist has police remove artist

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doeringerbootlegs.gif
dangerous art


I still can't quite get my mind around this story, although I first heard the particulars much earlier today: It's essentially the tale of an owner of an art gallery asking the police to get rid of an artist who was selling his work on the sidewalk a few doors down from his business.

[....] For four years the young New York artist Eric Doeringer has been producing work he calls "bootlegs." He sells the pieces outside [and sometimes inside] galleries, museums and art fairs in a conceptual project which has enjoyed some real critical and commercial success. The individual works take the form of scaled-down, very-affordable, crafted versions of the most recognizable products of the contemporary art market's biggest and priciest stars. His gallery is normally a sidewalk and a folding table, his public is a wonderful melange which can include the casual passer-by, the sophiticated patron or even some of the artists referenced in the work (some of whom have become his collectors). Doeringer has a show in Los Angeles opening next weekend, he will be in an art fair in Zurich the week after that, and we can expect to see him at Miami Basel later in the month.

Apparently Mike Weiss, who runs his eponymic gallery on 24th Street, where our young artist has usually set up his shop, had complained about [what I would describe as the performance element of] Doeringer's art the weekend before this and had threatened to call the police if he returned the following Saturday.

[....] At some point in the afternoon on Saturday he was approached by the police, who told him they were responding to a 311 complaint. They informed him he would have to leave [....] He packed up his work and confronted Mr. Weiss ...

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Interesting. I remember when this guy sold bootleg dvd's of Cory Arcangel's Mario Clouds outside of the Whitney Biennial in which they were exhibited... Robbin Murphy posted a link to this jameswagner.com post, on Thingist, this evening.

Originally posted on jameswagner.com by james


Beat Unravelling

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Low-fi art, or dirt style, distills the old from new media, casting a nostalgic and sometimes skeptical glance on the rapid obsolescence of new technologies. Take Paul Slocum's dot matrix printer turned synthesizer, or Cory Arcangel's hacked Nintendo cartridges: both pay homage to somewhat outdated technologies while, at the same time, breaking them down and de-mystifying them technically. The next step forward in new media regression is 'Transparent Processes,' an evening of live visual music curated by New York musician Nick Hallett that presents four acts: multi-media artists LoVid, musician Ray Sweeten, filmmakers Sandra Gibson and Luis Recoder, and the band I Love You--all of whom create original light and sound environments while laying their production bare. LoVid, for example, will perform on their 'Kiss Blink Sync Vessel'(2005) a homemade audiovisual synthesizer that interrupts video signals and channels them into abstract, pulsating video collages. I Love You will orchestrate 'color music' instruments, like the optical theremin, to produce a stage full of sonic light. 'Transparent Processes' is set to take place at the Kitchen on November 9th, and promises to lead its audiences into a bright, if overexposed, future. - Lauren Cornell

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DiY SURVIVAL HANDBOOK

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diysurvival.jpg

Do It Yourself Survival

Do it yourself survival is a collection of essays, tips and case studies collated from an online call for participation by C6. The eclectic mix presented within these pages shows the breadth and current diversity of art/activism practice today from around the world. Whether that is creating wireless networks, pissing on national monuments or building cardboard friends, it is certain that these submissions show that practitioners are taking their work to new spaces and audiences, redefining, through the engagement with the community, what we have considered to be ‘art’.[Mpre....]

Printed on Demand by www.lightningsource.com in the Uk and USA. [via netbehaviour]

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo