Posts for May 2005

Google's Last Bite

(0)

Will Google morph into the next Yahoo?! With the advent of Gmail, Google Groups, Google Maps, My Google and talks of Finance, Weather, Personals and Classifieds, the once bare-bones search engine is setting its sights on information hegemony. Noticing and countering this monopolistic eventuality is an artist group in Italy with their web-based project, GWEI (Google Will Eat Itself). The project exists as a typical E-commerce website that hosts Google Ad-Sense advertisements. With every page visit the site receives, it generates revenues from Google through the ads. Since Google is a publicly traded company, the money generated from the ads on the site are then used to buy Google shares. The end goal of the project? To turn enough profit from the ads to buy shares and eventually own the web's most popular search engine. So start clicking and we'll see if the plan will work! - Jonah Brucker-Cohen

MORE »


Rhizome is Open

(0)

Rhizome is pleased to announce the launch of our new membership policy. As of May 23rd, anyone can view content on Rhizome.org regardless of whether they contribute towards a membership or not. Anyone can subscribe to Rhizome email lists or add content to the site simply by signing up. All you have to do to sign up is register an email address and password--it's completely free. Utilizing Rhizome's core programs and services no longer requires an annual contribution. You can browse new media art in the ArtBase, take part in discussions on our lists "RAW" and "RARE" and receive Rhizome Digest, our weekly summary of relevant events, announcements and opportunities alongside an original piece of commissioned writing. If you become a Rhizome Member by making a contribution at an annual level of $25, you'll have access to the Rhizome Archives--all ten years of our art and text--as well as special Member features. We believe these changes will make Rhizome more open, dynamic and inclusive, and that our expanded availability will benefit our current community and newcomers alike. Please spread the word! - Rhizome.org

MORE »


Sound "Wurld"

(0)

An online quarterly published by New York's PS122 Gallery, Artwurl strives to create dialogues that enable its contributors to blur their roles as artists, curators and critics. Each issue contains a series of artists' projects, interviews between artists and a list of recommended upcoming exhibitions compiled by a guest artist or curator. The Spring ‘05 issue highlights sound work, including MP3s of an underwater installation by Abinadi Meza (USA) and a sonic deconstruction of mainstream radio programming by Kabir Carter (USA). Meza’s piece, entitled “Soft Jaws,” is culled from samples of the few "light-hearted" moments of Jaws, which are played through underwater speakers, such that listeners must be submerged in order to hear the work. In his project, "Decontrolled," Kabir Carter doctors mainstream radio broadcasts through analog and digital methods, and subsequently disseminates the recordings via the CD bootleggers that overrun the Manhattan thoroughfare of Canal Street. - Matt Boch

MORE »


Fermenting Openness

(0)

Lampooning the Free Software doxa, "Free as in speech, not as in beer," the Danish inteventionists Superflex have tested the distinction, and the refreshing aftertaste is that the two terms are far from mutually exclusive. Their Superbeer is produced and distributed in line with the Open Source principles of making the recipe available and realizable by all, like some works of Conceptual Art. But as we know, a commodity being free doesn't mean it can't be sold. What it does mean is that it cannot be enclosed in the thicket of proprietary regulations that ruin it for everybody else. Superflex are known for superimposing the methods and cultures of other disciplines (engineering, urbanism, development) onto an art/activist context. The symbolic provocation of Superbeer is welcome, and we look forward to seeing it on the Supermarket shelves. - Marina Vishmidt

MORE »


Oscars on the Net

(0)

For a second year, the Prix Ars Electronica has included a Digital Communities category. The winner, Akshaya (India), is an initiative that has helped to bridge the digital divide in Kerala by establishing 6000 Internet centres, and will continue their work with the prize money. Following 20 years in "business," the Free Software Foundation and GNU(USA) recieved a Distinction. So did Italian media hackers NGV/Telestreet for creating alternative TV channels to the Berlusconi empire, as did BitTorrent, for it's free p2p file sharing software. Honorary Mentions went to localised services (upmystreet and e-democracy); to worldwide accommodation finders (couchsurfers) and to the up-to-date tsunami blog (tsunamihelp). A trend was in the inclusion of developing communities using the Internet for information exchange--the Borneo Project (Malaysia), Catcomm (USA/Brazil), huaral.org (Peru) and Kubatana (Zimbabwe). The uber-cute microRevolt (USA), which can transform any corporate logo into a knitting pattern, and TXTmob (USA), the mass sms programme developed by IAA and used as a protester tool, were both chosen for their specialized executions of chaos. Free media-bank Wikimedia Commons (USA)--offspring of 2004 winners Wikipedia--rounded off the mentions. - Joni Taylor

MORE »