Posts for 2005

A Few Good Posters

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From Warhol to Adbusters, culture jamming demands attention like nothing else. It’s a simple strategy--artmakers inject unorthodox content into readymade media formats to critique the status quo. And in this Bush/ Schwarzenegger era of good-versus-evil, what better format to appropriate than the Hollywood blockbuster? 'United We Stand,' a new project by 0100101110101101.ORG (Italians Eva and Franco Mattes) does just that. A self-proclaimed 'brilliant mix of espionage and sci-fi political stereotypes in which Europe, not the US, saves the world from impending doom,' this non-existent movie is the subject of a world-wide faux media campaign accurately modeled after motion picture industry iconography and rhetoric. With the public ad campaign established, the duo's current exhibition at New York's Postmasters Gallery displays the exterior accoutrements of their pretend product--photographs of billboard installations, a promotional website, framed magazines containing movie ads, and a site-specific installation featuring live images from a hidden webcam that captures public reactions to the poster. Running through January 21, the show promises to appall right-wingers everywhere. - Peggy MacKinnon

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Art Dirt Redux: Interview with Luka Frelih

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Luka Frelih Frida V.
GH talks with THING.residency artist Luka Frelih about his Frida V. project  using a computer-enabled bicycle to map open WIFI nodes in New York City.

Art Dirt Redux site with mp3 file

ode/652" target="_blank">Interview Transcript
Frida V. project

If you're in New York through January 9th and would like to test out the project send Luka a message:

udmila.org
 
THING.residency is made possible with a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Swing Space program of the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. 

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Originally posted on Stunned by stunned


VisualComplexity.com: Brilliant stuff!Quote: "Visu...

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VisualComplexity.com: Brilliant stuff!



Quote: "VisualComplexity.com intends to be a unified resource space for anyone interested in the visualization of complex networks. The project's main goal is to leverage a critical understanding of different visualization methods, across a series of disciplines, as diverse as Biology, Social Networks or the World Wide Web. I truly hope this space can inspire, motivate and enlighten any person doing research on this field. Not all projects shown here are genuine complex networks, in the sense that they aren’t necessarily at the edge of chaos, or show an irregular and systematic degree of connectivity. However, the projects that apparently skip this class were chosen for two important reasons. They either provide advancement in terms of visual depiction techniques/methods or show conceptual uniqueness and originality in the choice of a subject. Nevertheless, all projects have one trait in common: the whole is always more than the sum of its parts." (via Matthias Truxa)
Link

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Originally posted on monochrom by Rhizome


A Critical History of Computer Graphics and Animation

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<img src="http://accad.osu.edu/~waynec/history/images/small/hmd.jpg"><br><br>Wayne Carlson, professor of design, art and more at OSU, has put together an exhuastive (and exhuasting), 20-part critical history of computer graphics, complete with images and movies of rare early works.

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Originally posted on unmediated by Ryan Shaw::ryan


OPEN CALL: LA Freewaves

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Too Much Freedom? LA Freewaves 10th Celebration of Experimental Media Arts

Postmark Deadline: February 15, 2006.

The showcase will present experimental media art from around the world at art venues in Los Angeles in November 2006 and through the Freewaves web site. Media art works include experimental video and film (narrative, documentary, art, animation, etc.), DVDs, websites, simple installations, and video billboards. Works from the festival will also appear on public television, cable stations and video-streamed on the Internet.
Competitive selection process will be conducted by a group of international and local curators with diverse specialties and backgrounds. Notification of acceptance is in July 2006. Artist payments will be $200 for selected works.

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For more information and submission form, go to: http://www.freewaves.org/

Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Marisa Olson


Dentists on the border Mexico / U.S.A.

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Dentimundo offers citizens of the U.S., a wealthy country where 42 million people do not have health benefits, help in finding affordable dental care just across the Mexican border. El Progresso, Ojinaga, Juarez, Nogales, Mexicali, Tijuana sit on the edge of the United States. Dentist clinics in these border towns are as prominent as three for a dollar tacos, margarita specials and Mexican panchos.

aaadent.jpg

Dentimundo.com documents this micro-economy, investigates border dentistry and offers a directory of dentist clinics along the border.

A work by Ricardo Miranda Zuñiga (see also Public Broadcast Cart and Vagamundo).
Part of the Tijuana Calling project.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Regine


Hypertemporality Animations

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http://hypertemps.procurate.com/

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This one must be seen to be believed. Visit Peter Baldes's blog to see Joan Jonas's Vertical Roll beautifully dissected into 226 giffords.

Originally posted on blog art by Rhizome


TransPose

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TransPose, by Feedtank, is a computer vision based instrument that addresses the absence of physical human expression found in most electronic music performances, as well as helps define a new movement based language for creating sound.

transpose.jpg

Computer vision technology captures the performer's physical actions captured and translates them to audio in real time. The performer sits in front of a camera, and his or her silhouette is projected in front of them in relation to a number of predefined trigger areas called "noteboxes." Using his/her silhouette to overlap the noteboxes, the performer triggers various tones.

In rhythm mode, six different drum sounds are mapped to noteboxes which the performer can strike to play a beat. In the melody mode, two instruments are mapped to two elongated noteboxes on either side of the performer. The hand's vertical positioning inside these noteboxes determines the tone's pitch. Its horizontal positioning determines the tone's volume. The performer can change between instruments and record loops that can be turned on or off to create layered compositions.

Window Media Player + Quicktime videos.
See also Feedtank's Dance floor moves and Full body games.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Regine


A Hilarious Animation of Me meeting Jason Alexander in the Bagel Shop!

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It takes a special low-tech, diy, failure-embracing aesthetic to love this video, and I confess to having it... In any case, I've been waiting for the right moment to reblog something from Marc Horowitz, my former bandmate, frequent collaborator, and one of the funniest people I know. If you're in the mood to see some art which also happens to be very funny, I highly recommend perusing his blog. ~mo

Originally posted on qotile/slocum by Pual


The Eyeborg

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eyeborg.jpg

Hearing a Colour Wheel

Neil Harbisson is, quite literally, a man who has always viewed life in black and white. The 22-year-old Spaniard, who moved to Totnes in south Devon in 2003, was born with achromatopsia, a rare condition that affects only one person in 33,000 and causes monochromatism, or complete colour blindness.

But last year, he was able to see - or, more accurately, hear - colours for the first time. Neil has been fitted with a machine that turns colours into soundwaves, with a different sound representing each hue. The Eye-Borg, as it is known, features a head-mounted digital camera that reads the colours in front of Neil and converts them into sound. A scale of musical tones represents the spectrum of colours - light hues are high-pitched, while darker colours sound bolder. It is, in a way, forced synaesthesia; its creator, 24-year-old digital multimedia expert Adam Montandon, describes the invention as "like hearing a colour wheel".

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Originally posted on networked_performance by jo